VAW

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VAW! VOL. 7 December Actor 2014: Kakihara Tetsuya [PART 1]

Joint translation by tsukikocchi, lost-in-hibernation and fugacissomnii in celebration of Kakki’s 32nd birthday today! Please excuse any errors and feel free to let us know. Enjoy!
PART 1PART 2PART 3

ー VAW: Please tell us how you found anime despite growing up in Germany.

Kakihara: I’m not sure about now, but as a child, German dubbed anime was broadcasted every weekday from the afternoon till evening. I used to watch that a lot, so anime was close to me since I was young. Like my parents, I took pride in that subculture they grew up with.

ー VAW: Did you like Japanese anime?

Kakihara: Yes. However the anime shown in Germany weren’t the ones broadcasted real time in Japan - they were from my parent’s generation, so there was a 10 year time lag. But I didn’t worry about the generation and just enjoyed it. I thought it was interesting to bring back that past era.

ー VAW: In your opinion, did German’s view anime as a familiar and profound thing?

Kakihara: That’s what I think. It was broadcasted every weekday, and lots of children would watch it every day. They talked about it at school too.

ー VAW: At the time, were you aware of the voice acting career?

Kakihara: I understood that voices could be used, but never thought it was as part of a job, or that people even did it.

ー VAW: So when did you first realise it?

Kakihara: It was one time when I was playing a certain love simulation game and the characters had voices. All the games I had played up until then didn’t have voices, so I was really shocked! “Whoaaa!!” I’d say (laughs). After that, I noticed that the people who voiced in games also appeared in anime, which is when I became fully aware.

ー VAW: Please tell us your reason for becoming a voice actor.

Kakihara: I originally wanted to become a kindergarten teacher during high school, so I worked there for one year as training. During training the children would fight, cry and get in trouble, but if you said character’s lines from anime, they would listen immediately. It had a huge influence on them, and anime became a great “textbook”. Important messages were being conveyed to children though anime, and since then, I wanted to voice for their sake. That’s when I aimed to become a voice actor. But at the time, voice acting wasn’t a career choice in Germany and stage actors were used for voice work, so if I wanted to do it, it had to be in Japan. So I withdrew from school, bought a plane ticket and ran off for Japan.

ー VAW: Did your parents strongly oppose running away?

Kakihara: They disagreed saying it was too reckless, and if I were a parent I’d stop my child too (laughs). But I thought that this was the only path to follow. I originally planned on going back to Japan for college, but then it turned into becoming a voice actor.

ー VAW: Were you the type to charge ahead with any decision as a child?

Kakihara: That’s right. Although I was never selfish in wanting material goods, like toys, I was the type to do what I wanted. So I didn’t give up if I decided on something. I grew up being taught by my parents that it was useless to cry and scream over not buying something, and that if you want something you should learn to get it by yourself.

ー VAW: Did you enter a vocational school once in Japan?

Kakihara: Yes. For one year, I’d go to vocational school during the day, part time job after, study Japanese at night school from the evening, then work part time again. Thats the life style I repeated daily.

ー VAW: That sounds very hard.

Kakihara: It was good enough if I got two or three hours of sleep a day, but I never thought of it as hard. Feelings of frustration were stronger.

ー VAW: What was it that made you frustrated?

Kakihara: I planned on being able to speak Japanese properly, but when you look at people born and raised in Japan, you notice your own speaking habits, and I was made fun of for that at night school.That’s what was frustrating. I thought that in one year I’ll just look back on the people that made fun of me. Plus I didn’t earn enough to go towards my second year of studies, along with the normal cost of living. I wonder if thats what became my driving force. But if I got told to do that all again, no way (laughs).

ー VAW: Those strong feelings to become a voice actor were with you everyday then.

Kakihara: If I look back on it now, I always thought that “I have to become a voice actor”. “There’s no other option”. After leaving home I had no place to return to, so I had to face forward and move on.

French Questions Masterpost

Hi guys. I finally got to posting the French master post I told you guys about. Hopefully it’s helpful. Btw I’m thinking about posting another mp on how to use passe comopose for French (Maybe Next Week). Anyways please message me if you have questions or just want to be friends :) Bye!

New Speakers

  • Oui/Non (whee/no) - yes/no
  • S'il vous plaît (see voo play) - Please
  • Parlez-vous anglais? (parlay vooz ong-glay) - Do you speak English?
  • Merci (mair-see) - Thank you
  • Voici (vwah-see) - Here is
  • Voilà (vwah-la)- There is
  • De rien (du-rhee-en) - You’re welcome
  • Je ne comprends pas (zhe nhe comp-rehn pah) - I don’t understand
  • J'ai besoin d'aide (zhay buh-swahn ded) - I need help
  • Excusez-moi (escoosay mwah) - Excuse me
  • Je ne sais pas (zhe-nhe say paw) - I don’t know
  • Il y a (eel ee aw) - There is

Greetings

  • Bonjour (bon zhoor) - Good morning
  • Bonsoir ( bon swar) - Good night/evening
  • Bon après-midi (bon ah-pray mee-dee) - Good afternoon
  • Madame (mah-dahm) - Miss (or Mrs. preceeded by a last name)
  • Monsieur (mihn-see-yuh) - Sir
  • Comment allez-vous?(co-mo-tah-lay-voo) - How are you?
  • Au revoir (o-rhe-vwa) - Goodbye

Informal Greetings  

  • Salut (saw-loo) - Hi
  • Ça va? (saw-vaw) - How’s it going?
  • Ça va bien (saw-vaw-bee-en) - I’m fine

Question Words

  • Combien? (comb-bee-en) - How much?
  • Où? (oo) - Where?
  • Quand? (kond) - When?
  • Quelle/Quel/Quelles/Quels? (kell) - What?
  • Pourquoi? (por-kwah) - Why?
  • Comment? (co mo) - How?

On the Go

  • à droite (ah la dwaht) - to the right or on the right
  • à gauche (ah go-sh) - to the left or on the left
  • au marché (oh mar-shay) - the market
  • au restaurant (oh rest-o-rahn) - to the restaurant
  • à la plage (ah lah plaj) - to the beach
  • à l'hôtel (ah low-tell) - to the hotel
  • l'aéroport (l'air-o-por) - airport
  • par avion (pahr ah-vee-ohn) - by plane
  • aux toilettes (oh twa-lett) - bathroom

Other Questions 

  • Do you speak English?

Est-ce que vous parlez anglais?

ehs-kuhvoohpahr-leyahN-gleh?

  • How are you?

Comment allez-vous?

koh-mahN-tah-ley-vooh?

  • Would you help me please?

Pourriez-vous m’aider?

poh-ree-eyvoohmey-dey ?

  • What’s your name?

Comment vous appelez-vous?

koh-mahNvooh-zah-pley-vooh?

  • What time is it?

Quelle heure est-il ?

kehluhreh-teel?

  • What’s the weather like?

Quel temps fait-il?

kehltahNfeh-teel?

  • How much does … cost?

Combien coûte…?

kohN-byaNkooht… ?

  • Where can I find …?

Où est-ce que je peux trouver…?

oohehs-kuhzhuhpuhtrooh-vey….?

  • Where are the bathrooms?

Où sont les toilettes?

oohsohNleytwah-leht?

  • Do you have… ?

Avez-vous…?

ah-veyvooh… ?

  • Where is… ?

Où est…?

ooh eh…?

  • Could you please speak more slowly?

Pourriez-vous parler plus lentement,s’ilvous 

plaît?

pooh-ree-ey-voohpahr-leyplewlahNt-mahN,seelvoohpleh?

  • Could you repeat that, please?

Pourriez-vous répéter,s’ilvous 

plaît?

pooh-ree-ey-voohrey-pey-tey,seelvoohpleh?


Resources: French for Dummies and Lovetoknow

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VAW! VOL. 7 December Actor 2014: Kakihara Tetsuya [PART 2]

Joint translation by tsukikocchi, lost-in-hibernation and fugacissomnii in celebration of Kakki’s 32nd birthday today! Please excuse any errors and feel free to let us know. Enjoy!
PART 1PART 2PART 3

ー VAW: Do you remember your first on-site performance as a voice actor?

Kakihara: I was 19 years old at the time doing a drama CD. Since I didn’t know much about which voice actors were doing well or such things, I merely heard from the people around me whoever was popular amongst everyone, and just thought, “Ahh, I see.” (laughs). At that time, I was given the name of my third role, which was a main role, and I had lots of lines so it seemed like something to be intimidated by but frankly, I yelled “Yes—!” with delight. Of course, I couldn’t perform as well as my seniors, but I remember I performed with almost defiant feelings that ‘it can’t be helped since it’s my first time’. On the way home, I heard that I was called out to by my seniors. I don’t remember this and even now they still make fun of me. It seems I had turned down their invitation to go eat out with them and in the end said “I think we’ll see each other again soon”. In spite of that, I wasn’t able to meet them again until 3 years later though (laughs).

ー VAW: Did you feel nervous or anything during your first time voice acting?

Kakihara: I wasn’t nervous, you know? I didn’t think of trying to be pretentious and show off by doing things I couldn’t do. I thought of just making the most of what I could do at the time, so I guess there wasn’t any point in feeling nervous. When more work is being demanded from my acting, on that occasion I can only make sure I get as close to my limit in order to achieve what is being asked of me. Even then, there is no room for nervousness. I just think I’m more sensitive to the feeling of tension around the place. If for various reasons I feel the tension is crackling in the air, I would keep in mind not to say anything unnecessary and go about things quietly. However, whenever I do that, I’m asked things like “What’s with you today?” and people even think I’m joking around, so I return to my usual self (laughs).

ー VAW: Over 10 years have passed since your debut but are there any sort of changes in your attitude and mental state when you deal with your performances?

Kakihara: None (laughs). Even the people around me often tell me that “there is no-one who has changed as little as you have.” I’ve been like this since I was new in the industry so I do get criticised by others, but that doesn’t affect me at all. My attitude won’t waver because I’m not pretending to be what I am, and it’s not like I’m saying or doing things that are wrong, right? Those who understand me understand me, and even if there are people who don’t understand me now, there will be those who will over time. I just think that if my acting is good, it will be easier to get others to recognise me, so I feel I had acted recklessly when I started out.

ー VAW: If you had to tell us about a part of you that has changed, what would it be?

Kakihara: I wonder… perhaps I have become a little more calm? (laughs). In the past, I would make it incredibly clear what I liked or disliked and I would only go “I love this” or “I hate this”. There were a lot more things that I “loved” just so you know. Now I am able to make a range from “Love / Like / Dislike / Hate”. There is no “ordinary”. I don’t think there is anything that is considered “normal”. There isn’t anyone who is “normal” either. Everyone has some sort of characteristic, a personality, so you can’t conclude things with words like “normal”. And in relation to that, I think I’ve already made myself clear, but also, a part of me has come to be a little more absentminded. In the past, I feel I was recklessly brandishing a bare sword and inflicting various injuries on myself, but I’ve more or less gotten better at handling the sword. Haven’t I gotten fewer cuts and scratches? But even now, I occasionally get a serious injury (laughs).


Beverly Gooden is a writer who started the hashtag #WhyIStayed in response to the media’s tendency to blame survivors when prominent stories on violence against women emerge, such as the video of Ray Rice violently attacking his then-fiancee Janay Palmer in an elevator. 

#WhyIStayed has drawn attention to the complexities of the domestic violence cycle that is so difficult for many women to escape. Gooden’s campaign allowed her to share her own story of the abuse she survived. She states, “I tried to leave the house once after an abusive epiosde, and he blocked me. He slept in front of the door that entire night. I had to plan my escape for months before I even had a place to go and money for the bus to get there.” 

Gooden’s message has resonated with thousands of other Twitter users who have used the hashtag themselves to share their own stories.

Read examples of their tweets and learn more about violence against women via Mic.

Contrary to what I think is popular opinion, men currently have and have for many years had available to them the option to feel anything they want, and in fact their feelings are often regarded as reason itself. If a man wants to say he is sad, he can not only say this but he can turn it into a selling point against which to buy social capital, as we know from the Sad Boy phenomenon of men like Drake. If men want to express anger, if they want to express even violent urges to commit violence against women, they are free to do so, as we know from the popularity of VAW-implicating lyrics in genres from pop punk (all of Fall Out Boy’s early work is about wishing women would die or drown or burn) to rap (Eminem has a very famous song about murdering the mother of his child and burying her body). If men are emotionally troubled, no matter what inexcusable methods they may use to work through this, they are allowed to portray this however they like, and often not only use this as proof of their goodness and softness as human beings but use it as a reason they should have access to women anytime they like (see friendzone nonsense). A man with feelings is a tortured genius, no matter how many people he abuses, no matter how cruel he is at his core. A woman with feelings is hysterical, a bitch, mean, a cunt, monstrous in essence. That’s important.

Four million women and girls in Iraq are at risk of undergoing female genital mutilation (FGM). According to the UN, the Sunni Islamist group Isis, which currently controls the city of Mosul, has issued an edict ordering all women aged 11 through 46 to undergo FGM.

Although FGM is a cultural practice in several African, Middle Eastern, and Asian countries, it is not commonly practiced in Iraq – another reason why this development is so disturbing. The practice “is something very new for Iraq… and does need to be addressed,” said Jacqueline Badcock, the UN correspondent in Iraq. “This is not the will of Iraqi people, or the women of Iraq in these vulnerable areas covered by the terrorists,” she added.

Learn more via BBC News.