Unmanned

As the sun rises, our Global Hawk is prepped for flight at Armstrong Flight Research Center on Edwards Air Force Base in California. Pre-dawn flights of our Global Hawk help beat hot summer days in Southern California. Electronic components, which are cooled by fuel onboard, only function within temperature limitations, so testing usually ceases by midday, as fuel and onboard computers become too hot to operate.

The Global Hawk unmanned aircraft is used for high-altitude, long-duration Earth science missions. The ability of the Global Hawk to autonomously fly long distances, remain aloft for extended periods of time and carry large payloads brings a new capability to the science community for measuring, monitoring and observing remote locations of Earth not feasible or practical with piloted aircraft, most other robotic or remotely operated aircraft, or space satellites. 

For more information, visit HERE

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

2

Victuuri Week Day 3: Goblin AU

in which Viktor is this 937-year-old goblin who’s looking for his bride and Yuuri is fated to his bride and can see ghosts:


It was the strangest kind of attraction.

Even Yuuri, with his rather dull intuitive perception, had been very much cognizant – at that precise moment of meeting the stranger’s gaze – of the sudden electrifying chemistry between them, transpiring ever so briefly yet imparting a long-lasting effect on his consciousness.

It felt to him as though the world around him was so abruptly thrust into an eternity of quietude, blurred by the hollowness of nonexistence, except for the figure of the man who captivated his undiluted attention, a defined entity against the illegible backdrop, like a distinctive gleam of light in a vacuum of disorienting darkness.

Keep reading

“voltron takes place in the near future”

Bitch where??????? Near future is probably like. 2020-2050 imo. We haven’t even gotten to fucking MARS yet and in Voltron canon they were able to get to Kerberos in TWO FUCKING MONTHS.

In retrospect: It took New Horizons TEN FUCKING YEARS to get to Pluto. NH’s speed varied across the journey obviously but averaging the Earth —> Jupiter speed (43,000 mph) with the Jupiter gravity boost (52,000 mph) we’ll say NH’s average speed was 47,500 mph (although this is probably really skewed cause by the time it reached Pluto it slowed to about 30,800 mph). Pluto is on average (not using Aphelion or Perihelion) 40 AU from earth. (abt 3,717,123,597 miles) 

This means that, factoring in the distance from Pluto to Kerberos (abt 36,000 miles) it’s 3,717,159,597 miles from Earth to Kerberos. It took a tiny, unmanned probe TEN YEARS to travel that distance. This means that, in Voltron canon, ships are able to travel 61,952,660 miles per DAY (given each month has 30 days, 30*2). In contrast, NH could travel about 1,140,000 mpd. Now from earth to mars let’s say it takes about six months with the current technology and the stuff NASA has planned. Mars is abt 140 million miles from earth. Divide that by 182.5 days (in 6 months) and that’s 127,853.88 miles per day. That’s with a ship with PEOPLE (and supplies, and everything else needed for the journey) on it with MODERN/POSSIBLY FUTURE SHIPS. IN 2016. So….yeah. I crunched some more numbers out of curiosity and it would take the voltron crew about 2 days to get to fucking MARS. MARS THAT TAKES US (give or take a month or two) 6 FUCKING MONTHS TO GET TO. They could get there in 2(.25) days. For us, going 127,853.88 miles per day it would take us SEVENTY NINE YEARS to get to Kerberos. I laughed really fucking hard abt this but GOD. Voltron is DEFINITELY not set in the near future. Because as things are now it would take us 79 fucking years to get to kerberos when it took Shiro and the Holts 2 months. So MY assumption is Voltron takes place probably 80-150 years in the future just because of how fucking SHITTY our space exploration technology is. I know I read WAY to much into this and did way too much fuckin math but I just thought this was interesting.

Studying Storms from Air and Space

Technology we’ve developed is helping study the movement of storms.  

From satellites that can slice through a hurricane with 3-D vision to computer models of gale force winds, scientists now have unprecedented ways of viewing extreme weather.

This August, we’re sending an unmanned aircraft called a Global Hawk to study hurricanes. This mission is called the “East Pacific Origins and Characteristics of Hurricanes,” or EPOCH. It will fly over developing tropical storms to investigate how they progress and intensify. 

The three instruments aboard this Global Hawk aircraft will map out 3-D patterns of temperature, pressure, humidity, precipitation and wind speed as well as the role of the East Pacific Ocean in global cyclone formation. These measurements will help scientists better understand the processes that control storm intensity and the role of the East Pacific Ocean in global cyclone formation.

To better understand hurricane formation and intensity, scientists also utilize models and other observations.

Satellites such as our Global Precipitation Measurement Mission, or GPM, and computer models can analyze key stages of storm intensification.  

In September 2016, GPM captured Hurricane Matthew’s development from a Category 1 to Category 5 hurricane in less than 24 hours.  

Extreme rainfall was seen in several stages of the storm, causing significant flooding and landslides when it passed by Cuba, Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

By combining model and observed data, scientists can analyze storms like never before. They can also better understand how hurricanes and other powerful storms can potentially impact society.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

Working through college had never been Bitty’s ideal situation, but it was the price he had to pay for choosing an out-of-state school, he supposed. Thankfully, between Samwell’s generous grants and his work-study allowance, he could scrape by at the pricey university without too much help from his parents. Even more thankfully, he’d managed to score a great job in a campus cafe in his freshman year. Sadly, his sophomore year didn’t work out quite so nicely. The cafe couldn’t manage to work around his schedule as well as it had the previous year, so Bitty was stuck scrambling desperately for a job at the start of the semester. He couldn’t be too upset about ending up working in the library’s main computer lab.

Overall, he didn’t mind it too much. The bulk of his job was just to remind people not to eat or drink too close to the computers and to occasionally go around and log out of any idling, unmanned computers. Otherwise, he was left to do homework (read: scroll through Twitter) at the front desk. He was doing just that, French textbook open in front of him and phone resting on top so he could use it one-handed, when someone cleared their throat above him. His startled jerk was enough to knock his phone into the floor, and he was thoroughly embarrassed by the time he grabbed it up and gave his attention to the man at the desk.

The guy looked familiar in the same way that most students around the small campus looked familiar and so obviously unknown to him. He was tall, with dark hair flopping over his forehead and a surly enough look on his face to drain the blush right out of Bitty’s cheeks. Still, Bitty managed to offer him an only slightly shaky smile. “Hi, sorry about that! I promise I’m not usually so jumpy, Lord. God knows what’s gotten into me. What can I do for you?”

“I, euh…” Maybe Bitty was imagining it, but he could have sworn the guy’s cheeks turned a little rosy. “I was wondering which printer to use?”

Keep reading

What Science is Launching to Space?

The tenth SpaceX cargo resupply mission launched to the International Space Station on Feb. 18, and is carrying science ranging from protein crystal growth studies to Earth science payloads. Here’s a rundown of some of the highlights heading to the orbiting laboratory.

The CASIS PCG 5 investigation will crystallize a human monoclonal antibody, developed by Merck Research Labs, that is currently undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of immunological disease. Results from this investigation have the potential to improve the way monoclonal antibody treatments are administered on Earth.

Without proteins, the human body would be unable to repair, regulate or protect itself. Crystallizing proteins provides better views of their structure, which helps scientists to better understand how they function. Often times, proteins crystallized in microgravity are of higher quality than those crystallized on Earth. LMM Biophysics 1 explores that phenomena by examining the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity. Once scientists understand how these proteins function, they can be used to design new drugs that interact with the protein in specific ways and fight disease.

Much like LMM Biophysics 1, LMM Biophysics 3 aims to use crystallography to examine molecules that are too small to be seen under a microscope, in order to best predict what types of drugs will interact best with certain kinds of proteins. LMM Biophysics 3 will look specifically into which types of crystals thrive and benefit from growth in microgravity, where Earth’s gravity won’t interfere with their formation. Currently, the success rate is poor for crystals grown even in the best of laboratories. High quality, space-grown crystals could improve research for a wide range of diseases, as well as microgravity-related problems such as radiation damage, bone loss and muscle atrophy.

Nanobiosym Predictive Pathogen Mutation Study (Nanobiosym Genes) will analyze two strains of bacterial mutations aboard the station, providing data that may be helpful in refining models of drug resistance and support the development of better medicines to counteract the resistant strains.

During the Microgravity Expanded Stem Cells investigation, crew members will observe cell growth and morphological characteristics in microgravity and analyze gene expression profiles of cells grown on the station. This information will provide insight into how human cancers start and spread, which aids in the development of prevention and treatment plans. Results from this investigation could lead to the treatment of disease and injury in space, as well as provide a way to improve stem cell production for human therapy on Earth.

The Lightning Imaging Sensor will measure the amount, rate and energy of lightning as it strikes around the world. Understanding the processes that cause lightning and the connections between lightning and subsequent severe weather events is a key to improving weather predictions and saving life and property. 

From the vantage of the station, the LIS instrument will sample lightning over a wider geographical area than any previous sensor.

Future robotic spacecraft will need advanced autopilot systems to help them safely navigate and rendezvous with other objects, as they will be operating thousands of miles from Earth. 

The Raven (STP-H5 Raven) studies a real-time spacecraft navigation system that provides the eyes and intelligence to see a target and steer toward it safely. Research from Raven can be applied toward unmanned vehicles both on Earth and in space, including potential use for systems in NASA’s future human deep space exploration.

SAGE III will measure stratospheric ozone, aerosols, and other trace gases by locking onto the sun or moon and scanning a thin profile of Earth’s atmosphere.

These measurements will allow national and international leaders to make informed policy decisions regarding the protection and preservation of Earth’s ozone layer. Ozone in the atmosphere protects Earth’s inhabitants, including humans, plants and animals, from harmful radiation from the sun, which can cause long-term problems such as cataracts, cancer and reduced crop yield.

Tissue Regeneration-Bone Defect (Rodent Research-4) a U.S. National Laboratory investigation sponsored by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, studies what prevents other vertebrates such as rodents and humans from re-growing lost bone and tissue, and how microgravity conditions impact the process. 

Results will provide a new understanding of the biological reasons behind a human’s inability to grow a lost limb at the wound site, and could lead to new treatment options for the more than 30% of the patient.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

It was obvious even back then, to anyone who made the faintest effort to look at the situation honestly, that the invasion was doomed, wrong, and a joke.

Do people not remember this stuff? George Bush got on television on October 7th, 2002 and told the entire country that Saddam Hussein was thinking of using “unmanned aerial vehicles” for “missions targeting the United States.”

Only a handful of news outlets at the time, most of them tiny Internet sites, bothered to point out that such “UAVs” had a range of about 300 miles, while Iraq was 6,000 miles from New York.

What was the plan – Iraqi frogmen swimming poison-filled drones onto Block Island?

This fantasy was silly when the scare story was Red Dawn and our enemy was the technologically advanced Soviet Union. But to have the president of the United States trot that one out about busted-down Iraq in a national address, and not have him immediately pilloried by the entire national press corps, was incredible.

The Iraq invasion was always an insane exercise in brainless jingoism that could only be intellectually justified after accepting a series of ludicrous suppositions.

First you had to accept a fictional implied connection between Saddam Hussein and 9/11. Then you had to buy that this heavily-sanctioned secular dictator (and confirmed enemy of Islamic radicals) would be a likely sponsor of radical Islamic terror. Then after that you had to accept that Saddam even had the capability of supplying terrorists with weapons that could hurt us (the Bush administration’s analysts famously squinted so hard their faces turned inside out trying to see that one).

And then, after all that, you still had to buy that all of these factors together added up to a threat so imminent that it justified the immediate mass sacrifice of American and Iraqi lives.

It was absurd, a whole bunch of maybes piled on top of a perhaps and a theoretically possible or two.

The bulk of them hid behind the morons in our business, people like Tom Friedman and David Brooks and Jeffrey “I trusted the Germans” Goldberg, frontline pundits who were pushed forward to do the dirty work, the hardcore pom-pom stuff.

Many others, particularly the editors, quietly sat by and let lie after lie spill onto their papers’ pages, telling themselves that this wasn’t wrong or a mistake until years later, when we found out for sure the WMD thing was a canard.

2

Goodbye Cassini

These unprocessed images of the Saturn system were taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft on Sept. 13, 2017. They are among the last images Cassini will send back.

Cassini–Huygens, or more commonly, Cassini, was a Flagship-class unmanned robotic spacecraft which was planned, built, launched, and operated in collaboration between NASA, the European Space Agency, and the Italian Space Agency, and was sent to the planet Saturn.

Cassini was the fourth space probe to visit Saturn and the first to enter its orbit. It studied the planet and its many natural satellites from when it entered orbit in 2004 to when it began its final suicide descent in September 2017.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Photos from Operation Haudegen

Being able to make accurate weather predictions is important for modern warfare. During World War II, Germany set up a number of weather stations throughout the arctic, even clandestinely setting up an unmanned station as far as the Canadian Arctic. On the 9th of September of 1944 eleven German soldiers arrived by submarine at Svalbard, a remote chain of islands a short distance from the North Pole.

Called Operation Haudegen, the men set up a weather station and sent daily weather reports to Germany. For a year the man of Operation Haudegen were forced to bear loneliness, harsh arctic weather, 23 hours a day of daylight or 23 hours a day of night depending on the season, and boredom. As the war raged in Europe and the Third Reich collapsed, they became more isolated as they were forgotten by the German government. Finally on September 4th, 1945, they were rescued by a crew of Norwegian fishermen, four months after the German surrender. They became known as they last German soldiers to surrender after World War II.

The following photos are from the archives of Lt. Dr. William Dege, commander of the Haudegen expedition. He is the man with the beard and glasses.

London tower block fire: Flames engulf Grenfell Tower

14 June 2017 London

A huge fire has raged through the night at a tower block in Latimer Road, west London, with eyewitnesses claiming people are trapped in their homes.

The fire at Grenfell Tower on the Lancaster West Estate was reported at 00:54 BST and about 200 firefighters are still tackling the blaze.

The Met Police said people were being treated for “a range of injuries”.

The BBC’s Andy Moore said the whole tower block had been alight and there were fears the building might collapse.

BBC correspondent Simon Lederman said he understood “a significant number of people” were unaccounted for.

The tower block contains 120 flats and is 24 storeys high.

Forty fire engines have been sent to the tower, and Mayor of London Sadiq Khan said a “major incident” had been declared.

At about 04:00 BST police said: “Residents continue to be evacuated from the tower block.

"Eyewitnesses said they have seen lights - thought to be mobile phones or torches - flashing at the top of the block of flats.

Others says residents - thought to be trapped inside - have been seen coming to their windows.

David Benjamin says he was woken by a neighbour banging on the door.

An unmanned hydraulic platform has been shooting water at the side of the building at about the 10th floor.

Simon Lederman said firefighters had not been able to tackle the flames on higher storeys.

He said the tower could be seen burning "from miles away”, adding that the building had been “burning out of control”, from the tenth floor onwards.

Andy Moore added: “We’ve seen debris falling from the building, we’ve heard explosions, we’ve heard the sound of glass breaking.

"The police keep pushing back their cordons, pushing back members of the public for fear the building might collapse.”

London Fire Brigade assistant commissioner Dan Daly said firefighters were “working extremely hard in very difficult conditions to tackle this fire”.

“This is a large and very serious incident and we have deployed numerous resources and specialist appliances.”

London Ambulance Service medics specially trained in life-saving medical care in hazardous environments have also been sent to the fire.

London Underground said the Hammersmith and City and Circle lines have been closed between Edgware Road and Hammersmith because of the fire.

Image captionSmoke could be seen from miles away.

Police said the A40 Westway was closed in both directions.

One eyewitness, George Clarke, the presenter of Channel 4 TV programme Amazing Spaces, told Radio 5 Live: “I’m getting covered in ash, that’s how bad it is.”

Safety concerns
According to Kensington and Chelsea Council, the tower block contains 120 flats and is 24 storeys high.

It is managed by the Kensington and Chelsea Tenant Management Organisation (KCTMO) on behalf of the council and had undergone a two-year, £10m refurbishment that was completed last year.

The work included new exterior cladding and a communal heating system.

The local Grenfell Action Group had claimed, while the refurbishment was ongoing, the block constituted a fire risk and residents had warned that access to the site for emergency vehicles was “severely restricted”.

The BBC has been unable to contact the property’s management company in the hours since the fire.

He added: “It’s so heartbreaking, I’ve seen someone flashing their torches at the top level and they obviously can’t get out.”

Jody Martin said he ran towards the building to try and help when he saw the fire.

He said he was shouting at people to “get out, get out” but that residents were shouting back that they were stuck as corridors inside the building were filled with smoke.

‘Building crumbling’
Tim Downie, another eyewitness, told the BBC part of the building was “completely burned away”.

“It has burned through to its very core,” he said.

“It looks very bad, very very bad. I’ve never seen anything like this. It’s just such a big fire.

"The whole building is just crumbling. It’s just billowing black smoke.”

Safiyah, who is about 500m away from the building, said: “There are lots of people gathered in the street. I just see more and more flames burning and tragically I hear people crying for help.

Super Puppy Love: A Super Sons fic

Synopsis: Damian and Jon had gotten the hang of working together as the Super Sons. Just as Damian thought that he could make this team-up work, he runs into an unexpected snag: Jon has a crush on him.

Update: I made a sort of epilogue/continuation of this as a response to a story prompt. Check it out here!  Super Puppy Love: Jon actually explains why there’s a naked Damian in his bed.



Keep reading

anonymous asked:

prompts: andreil with hurt or sick neil

Sorry for how long this took, hope it’s ok!

Andrew had been sitting at the terminal waiting for his twice delayed flight for the past five hours. To say he was irritated would be putting it mildly. 

Five hours of constant, simmering anxiety was pushing the bounds of what Andrew was going to allow. If the plane didn’t leave in the next half hour, the Florida captain and his offer could go fuck themselves. It wasn’t worth this.

The idiotic part of his brain was wishing Neil was here. 

Neil had a way of grounding Andrew when they had to fly, giving him something to hold on to, to distract from the animal part of his brain that dissolved into panic and fear. 

Bee would tell him it was good to form small dependencies, to live in a reciprocal relationship of trust and care, to allow another person to be a source of comfort. She would say that Andrew had given Neil protection against those who sought to do them harm, that he gave Neil the comfort and security of their house in Colombia. She would say that he should let Neil give him comfort and security when they had to catch a stupid plane.

The part of Andrew that had offered Neil those keys all those years ago, who’d made him promises he would die keeping, wanted to believe that he deserved to allow someone to give him that security and comfort. That it was ok to want that from Neil.

He thought he almost believed it.

Regardless, Neil wasn’t here.

Neil was still in his last year at Palmetto, and they were two weeks out of the start of the season. He couldn’t afford to come with Andrew to Florida for the weekend while he heard their team’s offer. 

Andrew had wanted to stay closer to Palmetto. The teams there wouldn’t offer nearly as much as the Florida team had, and they certainly weren’t of the same professional calibre, but Andrew didn’t give a fuck about any of that. He wanted to stay close to Palmetto because Neil had a tendency to find trouble, and someone had to watch his dumb ass. That person was supposed to be Andrew.

“You have to go, Andrew. Florida is one of the best teams in the league,” Neil had said to him, when he’d first received the letter.

“I pity you if you think I give a single shit about that.”

Neil looked like he wanted to roll his eyes, but wisely didn’t. “I’ll be fine,” he said instead.

Andrew narrowly avoided scowling. “One day I’m going to tattoo that onto your face so I don’t have to hear those words come out of your stupid mouth again.”

Neil had smirked. “Go to Florida, Andrew. This is the best chance we’ve got.”

He didn’t say it was the best chance for them to be in the same team next year. Florida was one of the top teams in the league, and the salaries they offered reflected that. They would be good enough for Ichirou, and though Neil was avoiding thinking about that at all costs, that was something he was going to have to consider when the pro offers came rolling in. 

Florida was close that Andrew could visit occasionally, and good enough that Neil could follow him there. Those were the important things.

So, the airport was where Andrew now found himself.

When the boarding call for his flight finally came over the speakers, Andrew buried the instinctual urge to run deep down. 

He was spending far too much time with Neil.

He joined the end of the queue of passengers waiting for the air hostess to scan their tickets. It wasn’t a busy flight, for which Andrew was quietly relieved. He scanned the faces of the people in the crowd, but saw no threat among them. Just a sea of boring no-bodies as irritated with the delay as he was.

He was nearly at the front of the queue when his phone starting ringing in his pocket. He was tempted to ignore it, but he recognised Neil’s ringtone. He stepped out of the line, ignoring the frown of the air hostess who clearly had no intention of waiting for him, and answered it.

“What?”

“Andrew?”

Andrew froze. That wasn’t Neil’s voice.

“What the fuck is wrong, Kevin?”

“It’s Neil,” Kevin said. “Andrew, he’s in the hospital.”

Keep reading