Unconsecrated

youtube

In the war, of the Gods we’re so greatly burdened
Confined to chains of our sins, as our lives are bartered
We must stand in the end, we must face our demons
Turn our backs to the sky, as we bleed for freedom
Bleed for freedom

"Huh....?"

is all I can say…

I just found out that Seven Star Pictures had picked up movie right to….

THE FOREST OF HANDS AND TEETH!?!?!

WHAAAAT?!

Now. I am offically confused… I do not know how I feel about this one at all… All I can hope is that it doesn’t turn into “just another zombie movie,” because the book is so much more then that. It taught me how precious life and love are and how easily they can be ripped away from you.

I will be watching this one verrry closely…..

And really?! Who is Seven Star Pictures anyways?! I have NEVER heard of that one before… I have a baaaad feeling about this… I think I just died a little inside. Hey, then maybe I will be the Unconsecrated to start the Return. Oh gosh. 

6

The Forest of Hands and Teeth | Carrie Ryan

**May Contain Mild Spoilers

I’ve been on a re-reading kick this summer.  I’ve been pulling books off my shelf that I read when they just came out, and that means that I haven’t read some of them in years.  It’s interesting to read something that I remember loving completely, and not feeling quite the same way.  Maybe it’s because I’m older and I have matured in the whopping three years since this book came out.  Maybe it’s because I’ve noticed different things that I didn’t when I read it the first time, because now I can pay attention to her writing now that I’m not wrapped up in a fascinating story.

The first book was never my favorite in the trilogy because Mary bugs the hell out of me.  Not so much the first time I read it, but she really does now.  She is really whiny.  She’s written as being headstrong, but I only see her making stupid decisions.  She tends to just accept what is given to her, whines about it, and runs off and does something stupid.

I can understand her obsession with the ocean.  Hell, I was obsessed with it until I could finally see it in person.  But to base all her decisions after the break on getting there?  Nobody has to come with her, she’s not making anyone go with her, yet everyone is acting like she is.  I was screaming in my mind to get her to say that to them.  And if she would have, I probably would have reacted better to her Ocean obsession.  In a world like the one she lives in, you have to become focused on something other than death.  It would have just been nice if Mary didn’t focus on the ocean so completely that she lost everyone else just to get there.

The sisterhood is one major thing that was done right, I just feel the book ended before we got a major question answered: Just what the hell were they doing?  For the life of me I can’t remember if we find out the answer so I’ll just trudge ahead through the series as a new reader, ha-ha.  They were a fascinating group of people who kept God in a Godless world, a world where there is absolutely no reason to believe in a god.  Sometimes abrasively so, threatening Mary when she wouldn’t “behave.”

To me, this book is on the short side.  It only took me a couple of hours to read it.  I would have liked to see it expanded, some parts added to, and other parts taken out.  We don’t need a handful of pages of her walking down a hallway in the dark.  But maybe more about life in their village, or maybe a little more about life before her mother died.  Those kinds of things would have made Mary a more understandable character, instead of throwing us into the plot right when things start to go wrong.

I love Zombie novels, and this one is one of my favorites.  I especially love how she doesn’t call them Zombies, but Unconsecrated.  That leaves room for mystery in trying to figure out exactly what they are.  We’re not told explicitly what they are, and I think that was a really, really, really good idea.  We don’t know how they got that way.  We don’t know how long this has been happening, how long the people have been fighting to live.  They think they’re the only living humans left and their task is to breed and survive.

I’m excited to see what life is like outside the fence. 

Rating | 4/5

PS.  Why does this book have so many freaking different covers?  We have two different hardback covers in the US alone.  I didn’t even post pictures for all the different covers I uncovered.

Book Review: The Forest of Hands and Teeth by Carrie Ryan

The Forest of Hands and Teeth (The Forest of Hands and Teeth #1) by Carrie Ryan
Genre: Young Adult (Dystopian/Post Apocalyptic)Date Published: March 10th 2009
Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers

The Blurb:In Mary’s world there are simple truths. The Sisterhood always knows best. The Guardians will protect and serve. The Unconsecrated will never relent. And you must always mind the fence that surrounds the village; the fence that protects the village from the Forest of Hands and Teeth. But, slowly, Mary’s truths are failing her. She’s learning things she never wanted to know about the Sisterhood and its secrets, and the Guardians and their power, and about the Unconsecrated and their relentlessness. When the fence is breached and her world is thrown into chaos, she must choose between her village and her future—between the one she loves and the one who loves her. And she must face the truth about the Forest of Hands and Teeth. Could there be life outside a world surrounded in so much death?

My Review:The Forest of Hands and Teeth is the first book in The Forest of Hands and Teeth Series by Carrie Ryan.I read this several years ago, before I was writing reviews. I remembered liking this book. I really wanted to review it on the blog. So, I checked out the audio book version from the library and listened to it again to refresh my memory. I liked Harry and Travis the most. I was on the fence about Mary. There were times when she really stepped up as the heroine, and other times where she let me down. She was following her dreams of finding the ocean at ALL costs, and this made her seem quite selfish at times. Harry and Travis had their priorities in order from the beginning. Cass, Mary’s best friend, grew and matured throughout the story.

The world was horrific and very well built by the author. It kept my interest. I do have a few gripes though. There were some parts that didn’t feel realistic. Such as, a place that seems abandoned one minute is being over run with unconsecrated the next minute. They don’t hide that well. They don’t know how to hide. Also, this same place had a very well thought out survival system in place, and no one survived? It just didn’t make sense. Yet, I couldn’t stop reading. The author really knows how to reel you in with her words. I really felt for these characters. In the end, I liked this book in more ways than I didn’t. This would actually make a great movie.

The Excerpt:

My mother used to tell me about the ocean. She said there was a place where there was nothing but water as far as you could see and that it was always moving, rushing toward you and then away. She once showed me a picture that she said was my great-great-great-grandmother standing in the ocean as a child. It has been years since, and the picture was lost to fire long ago, but I remember it, faded and worn. A little girl surrounded by nothingness. 
In my mother’s stories, passed down from her many-greats-grandmother, the ocean sounded like the wind through the trees and men used to ride the water. Once, when I was older and our village was suffering through a drought, I asked my mother why, if so much water existed, were there years when our own streams ran almost dry? She told me that the ocean was not for drinking—that the water was filled with salt. 
That is when I stopped believing her about the ocean. How could there be so much salt in the universe and how could God allow so much water to become useless? 
But there are times when I stand at the edge of the Forest of Hands and Teeth and look out at the wilderness that stretches on forever and wonder what it would be like if it were all water. I close my eyes and listen to the wind in the trees and imagine a world of nothing but water closing over my head. 
It would be a world without the Unconsecrated, a world without the Forest of Hands and Teeth. 
Often, my mother stands next to me holding her hand up over her eyes to block the sun and looking out past the fences and into the trees and brush, waiting to see if her husband will come home to her. 
She is the only one who believes that he has not turned—that he might come home the same man he was when he left. I gave up on my father months ago and buried the pain of losing him as deeply as possible so that I could continue with my daily life. Now I sometimes fear coming to the edge of the Forest and looking past the fence. I am afraid I will see him there with the others: tattered clothes, sagging skin, the horrible pleading moan and the fingers scraped raw from pulling at the metal fences. 
That no one has seen him gives my mother hope. At night she prays to God that he has found some sort of enclave similar to our village. That somewhere in the dense Forest he has found safety. But no one else has any hope. The Sisters tell us that ours is the only village left in the world. 
My brother Jed has taken to volunteering extra shifts for the Guardian patrols that monitor the fence line. I know that, like me, he thinks our father is lost to the Unconsecrated and that he hopes to find him during the patrol of the perimeter and kill him before our mother sees what her husband has become. 
People in our village have gone mad from seeing their loved ones as Unconsecrated. It was a woman—a mother—horrified at the sight of her son infected during a patrol, who set herself on fire and burned half of our town. That was the fire that destroyed my family’s heirlooms when I was a child, that obliterated our only ties to who we were as a people before the Return, though most were so corroded by then that they left only wisps of memories. 
Jed and I watch our mother closely now and we never allow her to approach the fence line unaccompanied. At times Jed’s wife Beth used to join us on these vigils until she was sent to bed rest with her first child. Now it is just us. 
And then one day Beth’s brother catches up with me while I am dunking our laundry in the stream that branches off the big river. For as long as I can remember Harold has been a friend of mine, one of the few in the village my age. He trades me a handful of wildflowers for my sopping sheets and we sit and watch the water flow over the rocks as he twists the sheets in complicated patterns to dry them out. 
"How is your mother?" he asks me, because he is nothing if not polite. 
I duck my head and wash my hands in the water. I know I should be getting back to her, that I have already taken too much time for myself today and that she is probably pacing, waiting for me. Jed is off on a long-term patrol of the perimeter, checking the strength of the fences, and my mother likes to spend her afternoons near the Forest looking for my father. I need to be there to comfort her just in case. To hold her back from the fences if she finds him. “She’s still holding out hope,” I say. 
Harry clucks his tongue in sympathy. We both know there is little hope. 
His hands seek out and cover mine under the water. I have known this was coming for months. I have seen the way he looks at me now, how his eyes have changed. How tension has crept into our friendship. We are no longer children and haven’t been for years. 
"Mary, I…" He pauses for a second. "I was hoping that you would go with me to the Harvest Celebration next weekend." 
I look down at our hands in the water. I can feel my fingertips wrinkling in the cold and his skin feels soft and fleshy. I consider his offer. The Harvest Celebration is the time in the fall when those of marrying age declare themselves to one another. It is the beginning of the courtship, the time during the short winter days when the couple determines whether they will make a suitable match. Almost always the courtship will end in spring with Brethlaw—the weeklong celebration of wedding vows and christenings. It’s very rare that a courtship fails. Marriage in our village is not about love—it is about commitment. 
Every year I wonder at the couples pairing up around me. At how my former childhood friends suddenly find partners, bond, prepare for the next step. Pledge themselves to one another and begin their courtships. I always assumed the same would happen to me when my time approached. That because of the sickness that wiped out so many of my peers when I was a child, it would be even more important that those of us of marrying age find a mate. So important that there wouldn’t be enough girls to spare for a life with the Sisterhood. 
I even hoped that perhaps I would be lucky enough to find more than just a mate, to eventually find love like my mother and father. 
And yet, even though I have been one of the few eligible during the past two years, I’ve been left aside. 
I have spent the last weeks dealing with my father’s absence beyond the fences. Dealing with my mother’s despair and desolation. With my own grief and mourning. Until this moment it hasn’t occurred to me that I might be the last one asked to the Harvest Celebration. Or that I might be left unclaimed. 

The Book Trailer:



Check out my reviews of The Dead-Tossed Waves and The Dark and Hollow Places

 



About the Author:
Carrie Ryan is the New York Times bestselling author of The Forest of Hands and Teeth, The Dead-Tossed Waves, The Dark and Hollow Places, and the original ebook Hare Moon. She is also the editor of Foretold: 14 Tales of Prophecy and Prediction and the author of Divide and Conquer, the second book in Scholastic’s multi-author/multi-platform Infinity Ring series.

She has contributed to multiple story collectons, including, most recently, Zombies vs. Unicorns, Kiss Me Deadly, and Enthralled. Her work has been translated into over eighteen languages and her first novel is in production as a major motion picture. Born and raised in Greenville, South Carolina, Carrie is a graduate of Williams College and Duke University School of Law. A former litigator, she now writes full time and lives in Charlotte, NC.

To learn more about Carrie Ryan and her books, visit her website.You can also find her on Goodreads, Facebook, and Twitter.

 

Chaos Records / Dark Blasphemies to Release UNCONSECRATED's Awakening in the Cemetery Grave in June

Chaos Records and Dark Blasphemies will co-release UNCONSECRATED’s Awakening in the Cemetery Grave in June with a vinyl LP version to follow later in the year. Featuring all the material the Spanish old school death metallers have recorded to date, the compilation includes the Unconsecrated Cemetery (2006) and Dark Awakening (2007) demos, as well as 2010’s Slave to the Grave EP, which was previously released as a 7” on Dark Descent Records. The material has been remastered by Skaldir at the Kalthallen Studios in Germany (2011) and cover art comes courtesy of Daniel Devilish (ENTRAILS, MALFEITOR, BLOOD MORTIZED). Be on the lookout!

Awakening in the Cemetery Grave Cover Art & Tracklisting:



SLAVE TO THE GRAVE EP (2010)
1. Intro
2. Buried in the Crypt
3. Exhumating Profaned Flesh
4. Slave to the Grave
5. Breath of Desolation (instrumental)

DARK AWAKENING (DEMO 2007)
6. Path of the Ancient Gods
7. Dark Awakening
8. Over the Throne
9. Temple of Darkness
10. Descending Into the Abyss
11. Tombs of Fallen Angels

UNCONSECRATED CEMETERY (DEMO 2006)
12. Recremated by the Sunlight
13. Journey Into the Crypts of the Dead
14. Morbid Dawn of the Deceased
15. Unconsecrated Cemetery
16. Recently Deceased
17. The Curse of Evocation
18. Dead Forever (Unleashed Cover)

UNCONSECRATED's Awakening in the Cemetery Grave Arrives July 9th on Chaos Records/Dark Blasphemies

Chaos Records and Dark Blasphemies will co-release UNCONSECRATED’s Awakening in the Cemetery Grave on July 9 with a vinyl LP version to follow later in the year. The CD can be pre-ordered at this location. Featuring all the material the Spanish old school death metallers have recorded to date, the compilation includes the Unconsecrated Cemetery (2006) and Dark Awakening (2007) demos, as well as 2010’s Slave to the Grave EP, which was previously released as a 7” on Dark Descent Records. The material has been remastered by Skaldir at the Kalthallen Studios in Germany (2011) and cover art comes courtesy of Daniel Devilish (ENTRAILS, MALFEITOR, BLOOD MORTIZED).

Select tracks from the album are now streaming at Chaos Records’ Bandcamp page.

Awakening in the Cemetery Grave Cover Art & Tracklisting:



SLAVE TO THE GRAVE EP (2010)
1. Intro
2. Buried in the Crypt
3. Exhumating Profaned Flesh
4. Slave to the Grave
5. Breath of Desolation (instrumental)

DARK AWAKENING (DEMO 2007)
6. Path of the Ancient Gods
7. Dark Awakening
8. Over the Throne
9. Temple of Darkness
10. Descending Into the Abyss
11. Tombs of Fallen Angels

UNCONSECRATED CEMETERY (DEMO 2006)
12. Recremated by the Sunlight
13. Journey Into the Crypts of the Dead
14. Morbid Dawn of the Deceased
15. Unconsecrated Cemetery
16. Recently Deceased
17. The Curse of Evocation
18. Dead Forever (Unleashed Cover)

The Sacred

SACRED SPACE: “This is as much as to say that religious man can live only in a sacred world, because it is only in such a world that he participates in being, that he has a real existence. This religious need expresses an unquenchable ontological thirst. Religious man thirsts for being. His terror of the chaos that surrounds his inhabited wold corresponds to his terror of nothingness. The unknown space that extends beyond his world—an uncosmicized because unconsecrated space, a mere amorphous extent into which no orientation has yet been projected, and hence in which no structure has yet arisen—for religious man, this profane space represents absolute nonbeing. If, by some evil chance, he strays into it, he feels emptied of his ontic substance, as if he were dissolving in Chaos, and he finally dies.”

SACRED TIME: “The participants in the festival become contemporaries of the mythical event. In other words, they emerge from their historical time—that is, from the time constituted by the sum total of profane personal and intrapersonal events—and recover primordial time, which is always the same, which belongs to eternity. Religious man periodically finds his way into mythical and sacred time, re-enters the time of origin the time that “floweth not” because it does not participate in profane temporal duration, because it is composed of an eternal present, which is indefinitely recoverable.”

COSMIC CONTEXT: “…[Religious man] assumes immense responsibilities—for example, that of collaborating in the creation of the cosmos, or of creating his own world, or of ensuring the life of plants and animals, and so on. But it is a different kind of responsibility from those that, to us moderns, appear to be the only genuine and valid responsibilities. It is a responsibility on the cosmic plane, in contradistinction to the moral, social, or historical responsibilities that are alone regarded as valid in modern civilizations. From the point of view of profane existence, man feels no responsibility except to himself and to society. For him, the universe does not properly constitute a cosmos—that is, a living and articulated unity; it is simply the sum of the material reserves and physical energies of the planet… But, existentially, the primitive always puts himself in a cosmic context.”

all from The Sacred and the Profane by Mircea Eliade