2

Uganda’s Anti-Homosexuality Act: ‘Null and Void’

In a victory activists were unsure they’d get, Uganda’s Constitutional Court overturned the country’s draconian Anti-Homosexuality Act today, declaring the anti-LGBT law “null and void” because of a parliamentary technicality in how it was passed.  

The court determined that when members of Parliament passed the law in December 2013, Speaker Rebecca Kadaga had not established quorum — a required minimum number of members present to vote — effectively invalidating the law. 

5

Deadly Mali hotel attack: ‘They were shooting at anything that moved’

(CNN)Gunmen who raided a Malian hotel shouted “Allahu akbar” as they sprayed bullets on tables of people who were gathered for breakfast, a witness said.

The attackers did not say a word to anyone as they opened fire Friday morning, employee Tamba Couye said.

They shot at “anything that moved” as terrified patrons dashed for cover all over the hotel, he said.

By the time Malian and U.N. security forces rushed in and ended the siege hours later, bodies were scattered across the floors of the Radisson Blu Hotel in Bamako.

At least 19 people were killed in the attack, said Olivier Salgado, a spokesman for the U.N. mission in the nation.


Interesting to see how the media seemed to pay a little more attention than usual on this attack, but not because some Malians were either killed or injured. It was because one of the first Mali attack victim was an American and also some foreigners were either killed or held hostage.

#ThemediadidagoodjobaboutjustfocusingontheAmericanlifelost

#Thereisabiggerpicturethatthemediaispretendingnottosee

#Onlycertainlivesmattertothem

#blacklivesmatter

#wehavetodobetter

Please pray for Mali and and not just for one life that was lost, but for all the lives that were lost in such a horrendous attack! This is our Africa. Please repost, reblog, post,  and let your voices be heard. 

2

Dozens of brave Ugandans gathered this weekend to celebrate Pride, even in the face of rampant homophobia and the risk of violence from the community or even the government. 

At a secluded beach in Entebbe, on Lake Victoria just outside the capital Kampala, a group of about 70 people holding banners including “I have a relationship with Jesus and I’m gay”, marched a short distance as music blared out. […]

“We are here to send a message to the wider population that we do exist and we want rights like any other Ugandan,” said Moses Kimbugwe, one of the marchers. “We think this is a step moving forward.”

Every time someone in Uganda celebrates their LGBT identity in public, it’s an act of resilience, of defiance, of revolution. I am forever impressed and humbled by these individuals. (via the Huffington Post)

vine

Let the Beat Go by Mr. Baby Oil

Queen of Katwe - Official Trailer (2016)

“Queen of Katwe is the colorful true story of a young girl selling corn on the streets of rural Uganda whose world rapidly changes when she is introduced to the game of chess, and, as a result of the support she receives from her family and community, is instilled with the confidence and determination she needs to pursue her dream of becoming an international chess champion.“

Get the book here


[ Follow SuperheroesInColor on facebook / instagram / twitter / tumblr ]

3

Charges dropped against driver in crash that killed 20-year-old:

According to police, the driver of the Cadillac, which was traveling southbound on MD 202, lost control and crossed the center line directly into the path of the oncoming Nissan.The driver of the Nissan, identified as 20-year-old Adedire Olanrewaju Ososanya of Upper Marlboro, was pronounced dead at the scene.

Calero, the driver, also the son of a state senate, was initially charged with DUI and reckless driving, but prosecutors dropped the charges, pending a complete investigation.

Please sign the petition in order to get justice for Adedire here:

https://www.change.org/p/maryland-state-senate-justice-for-adedire-ososanya-killed-by-a-hardened-and-repeated-drunk-driver-in-upper?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=promoted&grid_position=2

“Adedire Olarewaju Ososanya a rising star of his generation and a 3rd year student of Morgan State University was killed in a cold blood car crash on Thursday December 17, 2015 by a hardened and a repeated drunk driver in Largo Maryland. The offender has multiple traffic and criminal records. The alleged drunk driver is James Scott Calero, son of a state senate. James Calero is from  Bowie Maryland. WE WANT JUSTICE FOR ADEDIRE PERIOD.”


Nobody is above the law. Ososanya was just 20-years-old. He was a promising young business student at Morgan State University. No mother should have to bury her child! Please sign the petition, it only takes a few seconds. This is our African brother. 

https://www.change.org/p/maryland-state-senate-justice-for-adedire-ososanya-killed-by-a-hardened-and-repeated-drunk-driver-in-upper?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=promoted&grid_position=2

Reblog, repost,with the petition link, we cannot stay quiet as a community or things will never change,

#Nigeria

#protectourgeneration

#pleasesignthepetition

#ThisisourAfrica


https://www.change.org/p/maryland-state-senate-justice-for-adedire-ososanya-killed-by-a-hardened-and-repeated-drunk-driver-in-upper?source_location=petition_footer&algorithm=promoted&grid_position=2


article: http://www.wusa9.com/story/news/local/maryland/2015/12/18/20-year-old-man-killed-in-violent-head-on-crash-in-largo/77542836/

youtube

Queen of Katwe: Story of a Real-Life Female Ugandan Chess Prodigy

Here’s a trailer for Disney’s Queen of Katwe, starring Lupita Nyong’o. It follows the real-life story of  14-year-old Phiona Mutesi, an illiterate Ugandan chess prodigy, and her journey from the slums of Katwe to the international world of chess competition.

This is the real-life Phiona (learn more about her here):

And the movie’s got a great poster:

4

The graying of AIDS – Stories from an aging pandemic

Wherever people have access to lifesaving treatment, what was once thought impossible has become increasingly common: people with HIV/AIDS are living into their 50s, 60s, and beyond. As of 2015, half of all people living with HIV in the United States are age 50 or older, and by 2020 that percentage is expected to rise to 70%. More than 3 million people age 50+ are thought to be living positive in Sub-Saharan Africa alone, a number that could triple by 2040.

Ageist beliefs about who is at risk for HIV regularly get in the way of potentially life-saving information being shared with so-called “older adults.” (When tracking HIV/AIDS statistics, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines people over age 50 as “older adults.”) Here in the U.S., people age 50 and older are more likely to be diagnosed with HIV later in their disease progression towards AIDS than their younger counterparts; as a result, older adults often start treatment late and regularly suffer from more HIV-related health problems. Again, ageism plays a role: whether because of lack of training or cultural taboos and social discomfort, health care providers are less likely to ask their older patients about their sex lives or substance use, and are less likely to test those patients for HIV.

Around the world, HIV/AIDS data collection often stops at age 49, so the numbers we have are often estimates based on projections grounded in data gathered on younger positive adults. What we know with certainty is that the need for aging-related HIV/AIDS services will continue to grow as future generations have the opportunity to age with the virus. But there are a lot of questions that need answers: What new medical challenges will arise from decades of living with HIV/AIDS, prolonged use of antiviral medications, and aging itself? What kind of support will HIV-positive older adults need in the long-term? What are we doing to prevent new HIV transmissions among adults later in life? And how can we best take advantage of the wealth of experience, passion, and insights this pioneering generation has to share?

______________________

The Graying of AIDS is a collaborative documentary project created by visual journalist Katja Heinemann and health educator Naomi Schegloff. For five years the team has worked to create media stories, multimedia art installations, innovative public health awareness campaigns with NGO partners, and educational materials that engage diverse audiences. The on-going “Stories from an Aging Pandemic” project is a participatory documentary installation and online archive. The Graying of AIDS team works with HIV-positive adults aged 50+ in a pop-up photo studio and interview station, creating a collective portrait of the first generation of adults able to grow “old” with HIV/AIDS. Thus far, more than 100 people representing 17 countries and 4 indigenous nations have participated in the project at the last two biennial International AIDS Conferences in the U.S. and Australia; the team hopes to travel to the next conference in South Africa in 2016 to complete the series for the 20th anniversary of HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy), the multi-drug antiretroviral therapy that made aging with HIV a possibility for so many.

Photography by Katja Heinemann/Interviews by Naomi Schegloff

See more images from The graying of AIDS and our other slideshows on Yahoo News!