UCSB

Books that Elliot Rodger read

Elliot Rodger was very well-read. He talked about reading a lot in his manifesto: “I began a daily routine of walking to Barnes & Noble in Calabasas every day, where I would spend hours reading books that ranged from biographies of powerful leaders, histories of significant periods, self-help books, philosophy and psychology texts, and historical fiction novels. I sometimes even spent entire days there, from the time it opened to the time it closed.”

tips for choosing a college

This is a really exciting time for high school seniors/transfer students who are getting accepted to universities! But now it’s time for the most stressful part: deciding which school to go to. I was in the exact same place last year that you are in right now and I thought I would share some tips for making this difficult (but exciting!) decision.

Research, research, research. Online resources are the best. On the school’s official website, look at their course catalogs and major requirement sheets. If you’re coming in undeclared, look at their list of majors and see if you think they have enough options you’re interested in exploring. 

Also think about what it will be like to be a student at that school. Don’t only focus on the practical stuff like rankings and academics.  Look at the student orgs, events, and student resources. Follow their social media accounts (especially Instagram and Snapchat) to get a sense of the school’s vibe. You can even creep a lil and look at current students’ posts to see the campus through their eyes. Search for YouTube videos as well. There might be some vloggers who go to the school you’re interested in and you can see the day in the life of a student.

Take tours! Attend any admitted student days or come to campus for a regular tour. This is soooo important. You will get to learn about the school from an actual student and they will tell you more than you could ever find online. At the very least, walk around the campus yourself a little bit to get a feel for it. If for whatever reason you can’t go to campus before you have to choose, contact the admissions office and ask for some extra info. They might even put you in contact with a student who is in your major who you can talk to.  

Once you have narrowed it down to a couple schools, ask people which one they think you should go to. I did this and realized that whenever they told me a different school than UCSB (which I ended up going to) I would feel disappointed. I would always be like, “But why not UCSB?” You could also do the same thing by pulling names out of a hat. Think that whichever one you pick out, you will go to and see how you feel about it. While choosing a school should definitely be about academic opportunities and other practical factors such as financial aid, I think your gut feeling should play a role as well.

Do not worry about what other people will think. Everyone has an idea of what certain schools are like. It might have to do with rankings or other reputations that the school might have, but try to disregard that as much as possible and form your own opinions. Don’t worry if people don’t think the school is good enough or anything like that. After all, you are the one who will be going there for years, not them. 

Think about distance! I definitely underestimated how important this was for me. Consider how often you plan on going home. If you’re going to go home every weekend, a local school will probably work best in the long run. If you’re the total opposite and plan on rarely going home, a school much farther away will probably work out well for you. 

Talk to current students if you can. Reach out to alumni from your high school or community college who currently go there. If you do stop at the school for a visit, feel free to stop some students for directions then ask how they like going to school there. Check if there are any studyblrs who go to the schools you were admitted to (me if you were admitted to UCSB) and ask them any questions you have. 

So those are all the tips I can think of right now. Enjoy this time in your life because it is so exciting and you have so many options. If you have any questions about college or UCSB feel free to send me an ask! Good luck, and congratulations!

For every pound of tuna we fish from of the ocean, we are now putting back two pounds of plastic. This is a transfer ratio that we cannot continue to sustain.
—  UCSB marine scientist Douglas McCauley

We live in a world where college admissions can either make or break us. There is no in between. Isn’t it sad? How we are raised solely for this moment? Years of education, all for this moment of disappointment. The moment we get rejected, there are no words that can console the heartache we feel. My question is: how did we come to create such a terrible system? How can we just accept it when students cry their heart and soul after reading a simple, “We regret to inform you,” followed by sentences about how competitive admissions are this year and how each application is carefully read and how there’s always spring quarter. Then they start going back and wondering what it is they possibly did wrong. Was it the topic? Grammar? A misunderstanding? To those who don’t understand, they’ll think it’s because those rejected students weren’t up to par with the “standards”. I’ll only say this: how can you tell a student who has poured their aspirations and struggles and life into a college application that they just weren’t good enough to be accepted into ABC college and that student XYZ is much more superior? It’s complete bullshit to me. How can we accept such generic phrases after writing so passionately that our blood meddled with the words of our personal statements? I hate this system of test scores and GPAs. There’s more to the fucking world than numbers. There’s more beyond a damn essay that probably only gets skimmed over. How can college admissions officers look for qualified students based on such limited information that may even be complete fabrications. Tell me how. How can we accept that students are tearing themselves apart over a rejection letter? Tell me why. Why is it deemed “normal” that I have friends bawling because of an education system that builds them up only to throw them overboard?

post-mortem appblr post and plea for advice

it is april, march madness has ended, and i am done hearing back from all of my colleges! thank the heavens.

i’ll write some sort of ivy day/stanford reflection post at some point, but not this week, probably friday or saturday next week during spring break.

i’m technically an ex-appblr at this point but i don’t think i’ll be gone just yet, so my inbox is open if anyone has questions about colleges, the uc’s, ivies or the commonapp. please ask away and i’ll get back to y’all when i can. 

thanks to everyone who has supported me along the way; i’ll have to make another s/o post for y’all too.

i’m currently deciding between uc berkeley, ucla, and uc santa barbara for pre-med undergrad/biology major, so if anyone has advice on that please inbox or PM me. begging y’all. 

i’m looking for a good, safe environment and a good education but don’t want to be in a cutthroat environment. like i want time to chill and hang with friends too.

Oh lord, I just checked out Elliot Rodgers’ manifesto.

He never even asked a girl out. His idea of ‘putting himself out there’ was to sit in public and wait for girls to talk to him. He threw lattes at 2 women in public because they wouldn’t look at him.

Yet in his final video he calls himself a “nice guy” and a “supreme gentleman” echoing the entitlement of every guy who whines about the friendzone.

His entire “revenge” is based on imaginary rejection & it’s terrifying.

My sister is a blonde girl in a sorority and we need to address this case as a cultural problem so I don’t have to be scared some kid will kill her because she isn’t attracted to him.

STOP THE IDEA OF THE FRIENDZONE 2014