Trying to make my drawing settings the same on this tablet as my old computer

Top 4 Life Changing Apps You Need as a College Student (With Demos)

Hey everyone!  I was just using each of these apps today to study for my midterms, and I figured I’d share the wealth.  I got each of these apps from the Apple App Store, and use them seamlessly across my Apple devices.  I hope each of them change your midterm weeks for the better! (This is post is kind of long but I made it long to cover what I think are the coolest/most useful things about these apps)

App #1: Notability

Yah, yah.  You’ve heard of this one before.  I’m here to show you some reasons for that.  

Best Features:

1. Annotating and Combining All of the Powerpoints and PDF’s of Your Wildest Dreams

Holy crap is this thing good at converting powerpoints and PDFs.  The transition is undetectable.  Furthermore, if your lecture material was split up into 2 powerpoints that your professor posted, or multiple topics are covered in one powerpoint that you want to separate, you can either combine them into one note, or only import selected slides into separate notes.  Once you do that, you can draw, highlight, add photos and additional typed text…pretty much anything extra you’d need is at your fingertips. 

Demo: Importing PDFS:

Here I’m taking a random web page PDF from organicchem.org about chair conformers, tapping once on it, and copying it to the notability app.  

You literally just tap a couple times and it’s done for you.  You can add the PDF to a new note, an old note, or even take specific pages of the PDF/powerpoint and place only the ones you want into a new or existing note.  It’s almost too easy to be true.  


2. You Can Actually Write Neatly

If you’re anything like me, it bothers you how your handwriting suddenly looks messy when you write on tablets.  Well, notability handles that for you. 

Demo: Writing and Editing Written Text:

Here I’m writing a huge note of what I want to remember with the pencil tool. I picked a red color from the huge color selection, and a rather thin pencil line because it’s only a small side-note.  Of course you can customize your writing to fit what is easiest for you to read and study from.  What happens in the second and third pictures is the cool part:

You can use the scissors tool to put a circle around what you just wrote, and then pinch and rotate the text to change its size and orientation, as well as drag your finger to move it to where you want your note to go.  This way you can write super neatly and just do the moving around afterwords, making sure you can see your text and are comfortable with the way it appears.  You can also re-select it to make it bigger again if you change your mind.  

3. You Can Record and Embed Your Lectures Into Your Notes, While You’re Writing Original Notes OR Annotating Existing Ones

You can do them at the same time.  You don’t have to think about inserting a recording after the fact, or mixing up small recordings and meshing them into one document.  Notability sorts your audio recordings and fixes them up pretty for you, and just starts recording as soon as you hit the speaker button.  Then you can keep annotating what Dr. So-and-So is saying without worrying about your recording being in the right place.

Demo: Recording While Note-Taking:

After you’ve recorded, you can click the speaker button again to edit the recording’s volume, sort multiple recordings you’ve taken as well as name them.  Move the recordings from note to note, etc.  


App #2: Flashcard Hero

Known colloquially as: “How I’m Passing My Anatomy Lab”

Listen here y’all if you wanna make flashcards fast as fuck and learn them the day of your practical, Flashcard Hero is how.


General Overview of Best Features:

The way I predominantly use this app is by furiously making and organizing my flashcards into millions of sections and subsections on my computer, so that everything is findable and easy to access within my flashcard deck.  Then I move them via iCloud over to my phone and tablet to study them on the go.  

You can put pictures, videos, PDF pages, anything on the front or back of your flashcard, and just as much as you want on the back as well.  When you study, you can choose if you want the front or back to show up first, or an alternation of the two if you prefer.  There is no length limit on what you can place on a particular card.  

While you’re studying, the app gives you options of clicking “Easy, Unsure, or Hard” on the card you’re reviewing, so that it will pop up with the ones you’re unsure/really clueless about more often.  This saves my actual ass I can’t recommend it enough.  It has improved my ability to memorize tons of material far more quickly and efficiently.

Demo: The General Interface of Flashcard Hero:

You can see some of the features I’ve talked about.  If you want to know even more of the features, try downloading the app and checking out the “Tutorial” deck it includes on the main menu!


App #3: LiquidText

This is another insanely useful method of PDF annotation.  It is like nothing I’ve ever seen before, and is really good for people who enjoy mind-mapping and comprehensively organizing their ideas while reading!


Best Feature: Organizing Important Bits of Text:

Okay prepare to be very happy about this.  You can literally highlight a section of a PDF, drag it to the side of your screen, and poof.  Your highlighted bit is saved for you to click on and easily access later.  You can even link your highlighted bits, no matter how far apart they are within the document, to help connect and organize your thoughts.  And wait until you see Highlightview, where you can pinch the document so that all of your highlighted portions come together labelled with page numbers.  Too satisfying okay, too satisfying:

If you’re reading something really quickly before class, and you want to easily access interesting portions of a long text during a class discussion, this app will save your life and save you pain in the long run.

App #4: MyScript Calculator

Just watch the demo of this one and prepare to take a huge sigh of relief and awe and happiness.  It actually works and doesn’t confuse what you’re writing, and will do difficult/complex computation.  By changing around the settings to fit the discipline of math you’re doing, this app can save you some annoying typing into calculators and can help you visualize large calculations at a glance.

Best Features: Blowing my tiny, bad at fast-math mind

Demo: General Interface of MyScript Calculator

Just. Yes. Yes good.


Anyway, I hope you guys enjoyed this/found at least one of these useful!  Merry midterms!  

sketch of the red-cape surcoat link (from the skyward sword prequel manga). I love the taller and more badass Link designs in the series…

I was fascinated by this 'low-tech' concept

Steve Jobs was a low-tech parent

While many parents allow their children to bathe in the glow of tablets, smartphones and computers day and night, Steve Jobs limited the time his kids spent on gadgets at home.

Talk time: Apple co-founder Steve Jobs.

When Steve Jobs was running Apple, he was known to call journalists to either pat them on the back for a recent article or, more often than not, explain how they got it wrong. I was on the receiving end of a few of those calls. But nothing shocked me more than something Jobs said to me in late 2010 after he had finished chewing me out for something I had written about an iPad shortcoming.

“So, your kids must love the iPad?” I asked Jobs, trying to change the subject. The company’s first tablet was just hitting the shelves.

“They haven’t used it,” he told me. “We limit how much technology our kids use at home.”

I’m sure I responded with a gasp and dumbfounded silence. I had imagined the Jobs’ household was like a nerd’s paradise: that the walls were giant touch screens, the dining table was made from tiles of iPads and that iPods were handed out to guests like chocolates on a pillow.

Nope, Jobs told me, not even close.

Since then, I’ve met a number of technology chief executives and venture

Digital dangers: Apple co founder Steve Jobs restricted his children from using the company’s gadgets at home. Photo: (Photo Illustration by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

capitalists who say similar things: They strictly limit their children’s screen time, often banning all gadgets on school nights and allocating ascetic time limits on weekends.

I was perplexed by this parenting style. After all, most parents seem to take the opposite approach, letting their children bathe in the glow of tablets, smartphones and computers, day and night.

Yet these tech CEO’s seem to know something the rest of us don’t.

Chris Anderson, the former editor of Wired and now chief executive of 3D Robotics, a drone-maker, has instituted time limits and parental controls on every device in his home.

“My kids accuse me and my wife of being fascists and overly concerned about tech, and they say that none of their friends have the same rules,” he said of his five children, age 6-17. “That’s because we have seen the dangers of technology firsthand. I’ve seen it in myself, I don’t want to see that happen to my kids.”

The dangers he is referring to include exposure to harmful content like pornography, bullying from other kids, and perhaps worst of all, becoming addicted to their devices, just like their parents.

Alex Constantinople, the chief executive of the OutCast Agency, a tech-focused communications and marketing firm, said her youngest son, who is 5, is never allowed to use gadgets during the week, and her older children, 10-13, are allowed only 30 minutes a day on school nights.

Evan Williams, a founder of Blogger, Twitter and Medium, and his wife, Sara Williams, said that in lieu of iPads, their two young boys have hundreds of books (yes, physical ones) that they can pick up and read anytime.

So how do tech moms and dads determine the proper boundary for their children? In general, it is set by age.

Children under 10 seem to be most susceptible to becoming addicted, so these parents draw the line at not allowing any gadgets during the week. On weekends, there are limits of 30 minutes to two hours on iPad and smartphone use. And 10- to 14-year-olds are allowed to use computers on school nights, but only for homework.

“We have a strict no-screen-time-during-the-week rule for our kids,” said Lesley Gold, founder and chief executive of the SutherlandGold Group, a tech media relations and analytics company. “But you have to make allowances as they get older and need a computer for school.”

Some parents also forbid teenagers to use social networks, except for services like Snapchat, which deletes messages after they have been sent. This way they don’t have to worry about saying something online that will haunt them later in life, one executive told me.

Although some nontech parents I know give smartphones to children as young as 8, many who work in tech wait until their child is 14. While these teenagers can make calls and text, they are not given a data plan until 16. But there is one rule that is universal among the tech parents I polled.

“This is rule No. 1: There are no screens in the bedroom. Period. Ever,” Anderson said.

While some tech parents assign limits based on time, others are much stricter about what their children are allowed to do with screens.

Ali Partovi, a founder of iLike and adviser to Facebook, Dropbox and Zappos, said there should be a strong distinction between time spent “consuming,” like watching YouTube or playing video games, and time spent “creating” on screens.

“Just as I wouldn’t dream of limiting how much time a kid can spend with her paintbrushes, or playing her piano, or writing, I think it’s absurd to limit her time spent creating computer art, editing video, or computer programming,” he said.

Others said that outright bans could backfire and create a digital monster.

Dick Costolo, chief executive of Twitter, told me he and his wife approved of unlimited gadget use as long as their two teenage children were in the living room. They believe that too many time limits could have adverse effects on their children.

“When I was at the University of Michigan, there was this guy who lived in the dorm next to me, and he had cases and cases of Coca-Cola and other sodas in his room,” Costolo said. “I later found out that it was because his parents had never let him have soda when he was growing up. If you don’t let your kids have some exposure to this stuff, what problems does it cause later?”

I never asked Jobs what his children did instead of using the gadgets he built, so I reached out to Walter Isaacson, the author of Steve Jobs, who spent a lot of time at their home.

“Every evening, Steve made a point of having dinner at the big, long table in their kitchen, discussing books and history and a variety of things,” he said. “No one ever pulled out an iPad or computer. The kids did not seem addicted at all to devices.”