“A YouTube video of a chain-smoking Indonesian toddler inspired me to create this series, ‘Smoking Kids.’ The video highlighted the cultural differences between the east and west, and questioned notions of smoking being a mainly adult activity.

Adult smokers are the societal norm, so I wanted to isolate the viewer’s focus upon the issue of smoking itself.

I felt that children smoking would have a surreal impact upon the viewer and compel them to truly see the acts of smoking rather than making assumptions about the person doing the act.

There were no real cigarettes on set. Chalk and sticks of cheese were the prop stand ins, while candles and incense provided the wisps of smoke.


Source

thestar.com
Plain packaging for cigarettes might help dull allure: Teitel
Health Minister Jane Philpott has announced the federal government “will introduce new plain-packaging requirements for tobacco products.”

Prepare to say goodbye to royal blue Belmonts, ruby red Du Mauriers, and burgundy Dunhills.

In hopes of curbing national smoking rates, Health Minister Jane Philpott has announced the federal government “will introduce new plain-packaging requirements for tobacco products.” These requirements could prohibit “brand colours, logos, and graphics” on cigarette boxes and cartons.

If the Liberals’ policy is fulfilled, every cigarette pack in Canada will have the same uniform look and colour; its only distinguishing feature will be a brand name, printed in small letters at the bottom of the product.

This anti-smoking initiative will almost certainly be annoying for convenience store owners who, having memorized every cigarette logo in their stocks, might one day be forced to squint at hundreds of labels in order to select the right box. But by all other accounts, the government’s plan is ingenious. Here’s why. Plain packaging won’t likely convince Canadians to quit smoking, but it might dissuade them from taking up the habit to begin with.

This is because while the new mandate won’t warn people about the dangers of smoking (which they already know by now) it does something more powerful. It erodes brand loyalty to tobacco companies, and chips away at the only thing that makes cigarettes appealing to first time smokers in the first place: their cool factor.

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