Time-Management

7

It’s been a while since I’ve made a post, and I figured that these tips might be extra helpful with exam season approaching. As someone who struggles a lot with procrastination, I do everything I can to fight the urge to put assignments off until the last minute (even though I’m not always successful). 

As always, good luck! (ᵔᴥᵔ)

In honor of my 5th semester in a row of all A’s (hell yeah boiiiii) I’m going to make this post. I don’t know how I did it because I am honestly so lazy.

  1. Grades are reflective of your work ethic and your ability to strategize, not your intelligence.
  2. Be real with yourself. Are you sure you are ready to commit to perfect grades? Are you ready to work, day in and day out, when it sucks and classes are boring and hard? Are you ready to feel satisfied for all of the hard work you put in? If the answer is yes, congratulations. You are on your way to becoming a straight-A student.
  3. Prioritize classes. Not every class requires the same amount of work, and you should find out the hardest classes early on in the semester. These will take the most time, and you will have to spend extra time and effort to get a good grade. When choosing classes, make sure you will be able to handle them. Make sure you will be able to ace all of them, at the same time. That being said, don’t shy away from hard classes. You have to challenge yourself. Take a few AP’s. They are worth it.
  4. Make friends with teachers/professors, especially the ones that teach hard subjects. I am very close with my chemistry professor, and this has proved invaluable because I am able to get free tutoring, as well as a great recommendation letter for college apps.
  5. Have other goals. You need to do something that is not studying to keep you productive. I would highly recommend joining a sports team or club. I exercise (usually running and weightlifting) at least 2 hours a day, usually more. Playing 2 sports made me more healthy, social, and productive. Running calms me down, and weightlifting makes me feel strong. Do whatever makes you feel good, as long as it’s healthy.
  6. Learn to manage time well. How do I play 2 sports, get straight A’s, have a studyblr, and have time to spare? The answer is that I take care of myself well. I go to bed at 10:30 or 11 each night so I can get 7 ish hours of sleep. I do homework during lunch or in class so I don’t do it at home.
  7. Slack off. Yep. I said it. I complete assignments strategically, spending the most time on things worth the most points. Things that will only take a few minutes can occasionally be done in class right before the teacher is collecting homework. I have done this all too often. That being said, small assignments really do add up so make sure you do an acceptable job and turn them in on time.
  8. Turn something in. It is ok to sometimes slack off in quality, but if something is due, you better turn something in. Something is better than nothing. Getting extensions on assignments for no reason will make the teacher think you are lazy, or don’t care about their class. Every single essay and worksheet does not have to be your best work, but make sure you fill the basic assignment requirements, and it should be enough. 
  9. Extra. Credit. Some classes don’t offer this, but if they do, just freaking do it man. Knowing you can miss an assignment because you did extra credit earlier is the best feeling, especially when doing that assignment would have meant losing sleep. 
  10. Plan (sort of). I have a bullet journal where I write important assignments down. As I said, there are some assignments not worth your time that you can half-ass. The ones I write down are the ones I need to do well. If you write down every. last. assignment. you will burn out and stop planning altogether. 
  11. Sometimes, go above and beyond. You know that subject you really like? With an awesome teacher? Spend time on it. Make your project extra beautiful, and read ahead in the textbook. Watch video lectures online, and maybe even make a studyblr post about it. Your extra work might not be turned in for credit, but it will make you feel a whole lot more knowledgeable on the subject. Do this for classes you hate, too. Maybe it’s not as bad as you think it is. The extra effort might allow you to see the beauty in a subject you used to despise. 
  12. Be real with yourself (again). This past semester, I had a B+ for a few months in a subject I really love. I wasn’t mad, and I didn’t stress about it, because, honestly? It doesn’t really matter. Eventually I brought the grade up again, but it would be fine to me either way. 

Hoe Tips: Looking Your Best When You Have Zero Time

Alright y'all, I know you guys have started school and you probably have zero free time to really beat your face or look groomed without sacrificing sleep or classtime, so I’m droppin some quick tips.


1. Sleep>everything. Do not get less than 6 hours of sleep each night (really, no less than 8, but as a fulltime college student in a healthcare major I know thats not always realistic). Your physical health is more important than your grades, more important than doing your makeup in the morning, etc. Span out your studying gradually throughout the week so you aren’t cramming, and if you didn’t get enough sleep, just don’t do your makeup the next morning. I promise you, no one will really care whether or not you’re wearing makeup.


2. Have a 5 minute routine down pat if you still wanna beat your face. Mine is as follows: moisturizer/primer, tinted brow mascara/brow pencil, tinted BB cream, powder, blush and highlight, mascara, sheer lip gloss, setting spray. Easy peasy.


3. Lay out your outfits on your bed/dresser the night before. Having an ensemble already available to you saves a shit ton of time in the morning.


4. Have your lunch packed and your bag ready the night before.


5. Do some of your skincare routine in the shower. Wash and exfoliate while waiting for your shampoo to settle into your hair, leave on a face mask while shaving your legs, etc.


6. Apply coconut oil/castor oil to your lashes and brows before you go to bed every night for long, voluminous lashes and bold, groomed brows.


7. Keep a chapstick/lip balm on you at all times to ensure those babies are soft 24/7.


8. Never skip moisturizer. I like to use a Clean and Clear moisturizer with salicylic acid in it; it hydrates my skin and helps fight acne all in one.


9. Always have a hair tie on you in case of a bad hair day.


10. The less you wear makeup, the better your face starts to look without it. I used to wear makeup religiously (and I still love wearing it), but I found that sleep and making it to class/work on time every day is way more important than a beat face. Plus my skin benefits from having time to breathe. I promise y'all are gorgeous with AND without makeup, and your skin will thank you for having a day off.


11. Keep a small spray bottle of perfume in your car/bag.


12. Paint your nails/toes while studying. Reading over your notes while waiting for your nails to dry can make good use of some time.


13. Leave one day a week where you don’t do any school work, for beauty and personal care. Everyone needs a break, and that can be your self care day.


💖Thats all for now, good luck this semester hoes, stay beautiful💖

concept: me, sitting in a café and revising my notes. on the table are my favourite stationery and drink, and I am thinking about the great things I have planned for later. I enjoy my studies a lot, and am able to manage my time so I can both study and relax doing what I love. I have a healthy sleeping-schedule and am refreshed and at peace with myself and my life.

How to Manage your Time Better

1. Have a realistic plan for your day. Don’t just work on impulse, and don’t do try to do more than you can handle.

2. Prioritize your work, and do the most important things first

3. Know what your distractions are, and take steps to control them (for example, switch off your phone)

4. Start early, and keep on going, even when you feel discouraged or fed up

5. Know what’s irrelevant, and don’t waste your time on unproductive, or pointless things

6. Switch between focused work and lots of short breaks

7. Be flexible if you meet with obstacles, or things don’t turn out the way you’d planned.

Self-Care for Students

I am making this post because I have been demonstrating atrocious self-care. Well, I haven’t really been doing any self-care at all. So, for that reason, I am making this post to not only help myself but help other students as well—because I know I’m not the only one out there working non-stop and not taking time for myself!


Time Management

You may be wondering–how does time management fit into self-care? Time management has everything to do with self-care. If you don’t have good time management, then you are probably:

a) losing sleep to complete assignments

b) skipping meals to study

c) not taking time to just relax and de-stress

Make sure you are keeping track of your syllabuses and make sure you have enough time to complete each assignment.

Make appointments to relax whether that be alone, with friends, your s/o(s), or family.


School/College/University Counselor

If you are dealing with stress, anxiety, or depression, make sure you are taking care of your mental health!!! I can’t stress this enough!! Your mental and physical health comes first. If you are struggling with either, how can you be successful in your studies? Your well-being matters and you deserve to have some peace of mind during your school year.

Reach to out and take advantage of the resources that your school offers. Most schools should have a therapist/counselor on campus. If you don’t know how to see a counselor, ask around. This can be a good option for those who cannot afford therapy and/or do not have the time to go to a therapist outside of school!


Exercise and eat healthy

This is something that easier said than done. This is something that I am working on as well. My university has a gym, and I always try my best to get there, but the past few weeks of school have just been so busy and I haven’t had the chance to go.

This may be hard, but try your best to get exercise, even if it is only ten minutes. Even if it’s going for a short jog or running on the treadmill for a bit at the gym. Exercising has been proven to help with depression and stress. It’s also an important part of your overall health.

Many college students are familiar with the struggle to find affordable and healthy food. My university’s cafeteria in my school is ridiculously expensive and I bring a lunch every day. I commute so I am not familiar with things you could do if you are living on campus. If you have any times for dorm students, please feel free to add them!

I can make a post in the future about affordable food for college students.


Treat yo’ self!

That’s right! You heard me! Last week I went up to Chinatown and bought myself and lychee crepe—because I’m worth it (I’m working on building my poor self-esteem—I’ll make a post about that later). Celebrate your success by doing little things for yourself. It doesn’t need to be big. It could be taking a nice bath, go to a movie, hang out with a friend, etc. Going to school can be stressful and it’s important to take some time to do fun things for yourself. You work so hard! You deserve it!


This is by no means an exhaustive list. Please add anything that you feel is important for self-care for students!

3

I’m sure we all know how tricky time management and productivity can be, and also how crucial it is to be good at it, to succeed. So, I’d like to share a strategy of effectively managing all of those tasks you have at hand! 

Introducing Dwight Eisenhower, 34th president of the United States. He lived a super productive life, and during his presidency he implemented many transformational programs including NASA and the Atomic Energy act. Before then, he was a 5 star general in the US army, serving as the supreme commander, he was also the president of Columbia University… I could go on. 

My point is, he did all of this while still having time for personal interests and hobbies like painting and golfing. He was amazing at time management, and his most famous method of handling tasks, is called the Eisenhower Matrix

It’s a method of prioritising and sorting out your to-dos based on urgency and importance.  

It is super helpful is making us question what is important and actually necessary to do. I think that we often fill up our time with tasks that do not help us in reaching our core goals, and this method helps us narrow down our todos, saving us from wasting time, energy, and resources.

The 2nd and 3rd quadrant (not urgent important, urgent-not important) is what really minimises our productivity, if not properly managed and scheduled

I personally think its a fairly good way of understanding all that you have to do, what you should do first, and how you can deal with the rest. You don’t have to necessarily plan everything out this way, but its a good mindset to adopt when managing your workload. 

I’m so so awful at being concise (I’m so sorry for the long post!!) But I help this has helped you guys. Hopefully I’m going to post a printable of the matrix in the near future, so keep an eye out for that :)

What is important is seldom urgent and what is urgent is seldom important.
-Dwight Eisenhower

“Productivity is about making smart choices (continuously) with your energy, focus and time in order to maximise your potential and achieve beneficial results.” – Mohammed Faris


1. Find your energy hours.

Everyone has a specific time in the day where their energy levels are much higher than usual. Use that time to your advantage. Take that energy and get the majority of your work done and out of the way.

For me, the mornings are usually when I feel the most energised, so I get to work straight away. To find your energy hours, try working at different times during the day. See which time of the day allows you to work at your very best.


2. Establish routines.

Once you have found your energy hours, base your day around this. Create a routine for each day of the week.

When do you study? When do you go to school? Do you relax for an hour after coming back from school? Do you tidy your room on Sunday?

Establish a schedule and you’re less likely to get side-tracked and much more likely to maximise your productivity.


3. Ditch the to-do lists.

Yes, it’s good to write lists of things you need to do, but you’re never going to get around to doing them if you don’t plan time for it. So instead of relying on a to-do list, add the task to your routine. Will you be able to work on this task on a Saturday afternoon? Great! Put it into your schedule. This will ensure the task is completed.


4. Don’t multi-task.

You can’t do multiple things at once. It seems like you’re able to, but what you’re really doing is constantly switching your attention from one task to another. Don’t do that. Focus on one thing at a time. That way, you’re putting all of your attention on a task and are likely to get it completed faster and at a higher standard.


5. Complete similar tasks together.

If you’re studying, instead of switching from subject to subject throughout the day, try to stick to one subject. On Monday, create flashcards for a Biology topic, then revise the topic and then do a Biology past paper. This will ensure your mind is concentrated on one thing at a time and not constantly switching gears.

So get your chores done together. Study one subject at a time. Send your e-mails and messages at one time. Dedicate today to your English essay. Don’t interrupt tasks with an unrelated task.


6. Finish quick and easy tasks first.

If you need to make a dentist appointment, do it. Do you need to write a quick e-mail to your teacher? Get it out of the way.

Finishing the quick and easy tasks right away will leave you with ample time to tackle the more challenging ones you’ve got up ahead. It will also give you peace of mind that you’ve gotten something done today.


7. Take breaks.

You’re not a machine. Productivity is not working 24/7.

“Being productive is about knowing when to have fun and when to work hard; when to relax and when to be serious. It’s about making smart choices.”

Allow your mind and body to take a break every now and then and relax. Scheduling these breaks can be beneficial so that you’re not constantly taking a break when you don’t need to.


8. Prioritise.

Yes, that idea you had on the train was appealing, but is it really that beneficial? Is it important enough for you to spend your valuable time and energy on it? Will it get you where you want to go? Probably not.

So prioritise projects and tasks. Ensure important tasks are completed first and well before any upcoming deadlines. Make sure that your time is better spent doing things that will actually benefit you and bring you closer to your goals.


9. Become accountable to someone.

It’s super easy to make promises to yourself, saying that you will do this and do that. Likewise, it’s also extremely easy to break those promises.

However, this is different when you have someone you are accountable to. Perhaps, at the end of every week, you can report to a parent or a trusted friend on your progress so far. It’s extremely difficult to tell someone that you haven’t accomplished your goals for the week. This will make it far more likely for you to get your work done.


10. Review your progress.

At the end of each day, you should evaluate your progress. What did you accomplish today? What did you do well? What did you not complete today? Why? How could you improve? When will you complete it?

Asking yourself these questions and being honest will help you see where you’re going right and where you’re not doing so well.


I hope this is useful to some of you and that you put your time and energy into good use. 😊

8 Time Management Tips

1. Recognize that multitasking makes you less effective – and don’t do it if the work is important.

2. Know when you work best – and schedule studying, assignments and projects for that part of the day.

3. Do the most important tasks first. For example, if a project is worth a large proportion of your grade, then make sure you spend lots of time on that (whether you like the subject or not.)

4. Check email, facebook, messages, texts etc at set times – such as on the hour. Don’t look at them at other times.

5. Know what works as a reward for you, and reward yourself when you complete a task. But don’t reward yourself until the task is done!

6. Have an organised to-do list, and work through it methodically.

7. Don’t allow yourself to be sidetracked by friends, or unexpected opportunities.

8. Schedule in some leisure as you can’t work all the time.

Try to get up early! I know a lot of people who like to sleep in, but I also know some who don’t feel productive if they don’t get up early. Getting up early (and not necessarily super early, maybe one or two hours later than you’d get up for school) on the weekend or on a day off gets you moving and ready to start your day. 

Do some sort of exercise early in the day. It doesn’t have to be intense or a lot, but get moving. It could be anything from an actual workout to just walking to a bookstore or coffeeshop to start your day.

Eat breakfast! If you don’t like getting up early, eating a really good breakfast can make your day. And if you do get up early, you’ll have enough time to actually make something.

Schedule your day. Don’t schedule it down to the last minute, but schedule the big things you need to get done. If you need an alert on your phone or computer to remind you, some good calendars I recommend are: Timepage, Google Calendar, Schoolhub Students(not necessarily a calendar but the best I’ve used for tracking assignments),  and Outlook Calendar(ok so Sunrise was THE BEST calendar app I have ever used but it was discontinued and kind of moved to Outlook).

Write down absolutely everything you need to accomplish. Do this first. It doesn’t matter how big or how small it is, just do it. It might be a pretty long list, and that’s ok. If you have bigger tasks, like writing a paper, break it down further into something like research, brainstorm, thesis, etc. You can further break those down too. The eventual goal is to break down the massive tasks into small, manageable things that you can handle so you don’t feel overwhelmed. 

Prioritize the things you need to do. What I generally tend to do is prioritize the assignments and tests that are coming up first, but if I have a bigger test after them, that can become an equal priority. So for example, if I have a worksheet due first period tomorrow, a quiz fourth period that same day, and a major test two days away, I would do the worksheet first, do about half my studying for the major test, study for the quiz, then finish my studying for the major test. 

Get started on something! Once you’ve got all your ducks in a row, get to work. If music helps you focus, listen to it, or if wearing a comfy sweater helps you destress, wear it. Find what works for you and use it to your advantage. 

Don’t forget to take breaks. Use something to help you time your breaks- I personally like to use forest, but one that I’ve tried and liked is flat tomato. Do something you like during your breaks- your brain needs time to process what you’ve been working on. 

Try to get all of your work done before evening- but if you don’t get it all done, it’s not the end of the world. Use this time for yourself, so watch a good movie, eat dinner, play an instrument, whatever makes you happy. This is your self-care time- you work hard and you deserve it!

-keaton

  1. Set your priorities straight. As you’ve entered school, you know that your academics are basically one of your priorities, aside from your personal health. You are a student, after all. You should know that you should be making time for all the school work you’re supposed to be dealing with. If you’re having trouble with this, I suggest you write your priorities down, and rank them according to which one weighs the most. This will make you feel much more headstrong and goal-oriented.
  2. Use schedulers and planners. You’re human and it’s okay to forget things. Get digital with apps and programs or get traditional with notebooks and planners. Involve your planning with a combination of both. This really helps especially if you’ve created a system for remembering things more efficiently, eg. color-coding, bullet journaling, weekly overviews, having legends, etc., which leads us to the next point:
  3. Schedule in advance. Complete the difficult tasks, the easy tasks, the medium tasks. Do what you can. Set deadlines for yourself. If you’re fully aware that three weeks from now, you’ll have 3 exams in a day, start studying as early as possible. If you have to attend to an event and have an exam the day after, bring any study material with you. Do homework the day they’re given to you, especially if they’re fairly easy. If they need some research or data collection, make it a point that you do it after class or on the nearest weekend. Break the habit of doing something because a classmate has already started doing his/hers. Instead, do it for the motivation that you’ve set for yourself.
  4. Prevent causes of distraction. There are only 24 hours in a day, and a fraction of which we use for fulfilling our basic necessities. Utilize the remaining time for productivity. Delete social media apps if you have to, or turn off your internet. Better yet, turn off your phone and exchange phones with your roommate or your friend. Keep it. Forget about it for a moment. You can always leave your feed but it will never leave you. You can always return to it after you’ve done your work.
  5. Multi-task! I can never stress the importance of learning multi-tasking enough. Whenever I’m in a long meeting, I usually bring my laptop to review notes or write a paper. Of course, it would seem rude to some so it’s better if you would give them a heads-up. If I’m in a class I find easy and if the professor allows us to study or drift off, I usually study for other classes that I need more attention in. While I take showers, I discuss the exam material from my memory out loud. If you have to wait in line for some errand, bring a book. Sometimes while doing my night care routine, I would listen to audio recordings of my professor. Some of these examples may come off as rude or off-putting, I know. But that’s just me. You can always find other safer situations where you could practice multi-tasking.
  6. Now, not tomorrow. If you happen to finish a scheduled task and got a little free time, it gives you all the reason to do some of the things you have scheduled for other days. If you can do it now without any constraint, why would you choose to do it later?
  7. Ask for help. If a friend’s not too busy, don’t be afraid to ask for a little help! You can ask them favors of proofreading your essay. You can ask them about the notes that you didn’t take down of. You can ask them about how this certain professor’s exam types. The possibilities are endless. Just know the right people and places. Don’t dwell too much on tiny details. If you have misunderstood a certain topic, ask your roommate, ask the person next door. Go to the nearest library. Check the internet for answers. You can consult your teacher or professor. Don’t be afraid to ask for a little assistance. No man is an island.
  8. You have all the time on your hands. If you believe that you can do it, and if you really want to do it, you will. Taking up other commitments and responsibilities is never a problem, as long as you know you can handle them without sacrificing another. You are always allowed to say no. If you have as many organizations as me, remember that work should never get in the way of your priorities. Just keep in mind that everyone has their certain limits, and you do too.
  9. If all else fails, CLUTCH IT!! I’m not joking, I’ve done this multiple times. I came out alive but I have to admit that not all of my crammed output had the best marks (although some of them did!). If you don’t want to be in this heart-racing situation, then be as diligent as possible with your work! Make it a habit.

Always remember that these tips may or may not help anyone the same as it did with me, but I’m glad that I have this opportunity to get this out there. Find your rhythm. I know it takes time, but don’t stress yourself too much because all of your efforts will be successful. Some efforts may just be rewarded in ways that you didn’t plan to, while some just lead you nearer to your dreams. Just keep doing you, and you’ll get through this.

I believe in you.

7 Apps for Studying and Time Management

Companion video: link

Memorigi

Android [FREE]: link
iPhone: [NOT AVAILABLE]
Similar app: Wunderlist [FREE] link

Memorigi is a really easy to use time management app where you can log in all of your tasks for the day, week and month. You can use a color code to track your tasks by theme or by subject so you can understand what your workload will be for the next few days. I really like this app’s simple layout and the fact that you can chose between different views, namely between a daily view or a three-days view. It also lets you set an alarm to remind you that your tasks and events are coming up. Other similar apps to consider are Google Calendar and Evernote.


Duolingo
Android [FREE]: link
iPhone [FREE]: link

Duolingo is an app that lets you learn languages through an array of mini games and exercises that you can complete daily, increasing your fluency and mastery step by step. Each language comes with dozens of different themed levels that teach you different aspects of vocabulary and grammar so you can build up your knowledge on that language. Each level recycles what you’ve learned in past levels to make sure that you still remember that you have learned before. You can also use the training icon to get a personalized lesson with your weakest words, so you can really tackle whatever you are having a difficult time with, before moving on with the learning process. I also enjoy the fact that the levels are short and you aren’t required to speak or listen, so it’s the perfect way to spend some idle time during commuting to school.


►Forest:
Android [FREE]: link
iPhone [1,99$]: link

Another app that I always talk about is Forest, and for me it’s the best way to use the Pomodoro Technique whilst having a true visual experience of your productivity levels. The concept is quite simple: for each block of time you spend studying, you plant a virtual tree. While that tree grows, you cannot use other app in your phone, less you get distracted. When the timer reaches zero, you will have planted a tree in your forest. The more trees you have, the more productive you were during that day.

Loop - Habit Tracker
Android [FREE]: link
iPhone: NOT AVAILABLE
HabitBull [FREE], similar app: link

Habits is an habit tracker app that lets you follow up on those small daily tasks that we sometimes forget, like drinking enough water, taking medication or taking a walk outside. It’s very simple to use – all you have to do is insert which tasks you want to track and just press the small cross to mark it for that day. As time goes by, you will build a graphic that tells you how many times you’ve forgotten certain tasks and where you should improve. I usually do this by hand in my bullet journal but I think that tracking your habits with an app should please everyone who prefers to manage their time with their phone and doesn’t like to carry a notebook around.

SaveMyTime
Android [FREE]: link
iPhone: NOT AVAILABLE
Similar app: link

Still on the time management theme, I think that everyone should try at least once in their life to really understand how they are spending their time. A time wheel lets you do this – you basically input how you have been spending your time during the day, with transportation, sleeping, eating, studying and taking classes and you will be baffled by how little time you can actually spend at your own will. This app lets you do exactly this, you just insert the amount of time you have been doing something and it will build a time wheel for you, so you can reflect where you have been wasting your time and re-organize your schedule. I think this is a great challenge to keep up with during a week and just reflect on how you are actually living your life. Basically, it sets a tracking time and when you unlock your phone, the app will ask you what you have been doing for the past fifteen minutes so you can build your time wheel gradually during the day without even noticing it.

Quizlet
Android [FREE]: link
iPhone [FREE]: link

A great app to save paper, ink and time is quizlet. It basically replaces all of your physical flash cards and lets you keep entire sets of questions and answers in your phone under your personal account. You can then export these to your computer and share them with your friends. I think this is an amazing app for anyone who relies on definition based classes and tests and is something great to use on idle times or when you need to study but only have your phone around. It has tons of different ways to test your knowledge on a subject and it can even read your cards out loud as if you were being questioned by your professor.

Timetable
Android [FREE]: link
iPhone [NOT AVAILABLE]
Similar app: Class Timetable [FREE]: link

Finally, and this is one of my favorites, there is a widget timetable app so you can place your school timetable in your homescreen and never skip a class again. I usually never know where I am going to have class and sometimes it’s not really useful to take out your planner and look at your schedule so having it right on your homescreen is really useful.

You can insert all data related to your class in this widget, like the name of the class, the location, participants and total duration. You can always assign a color to a certain class. Afterwards, you just tap the screen to assign your class to a certain timeblock and there you have it.

5 Tips for Staying Motivated

1. Reward as you go. You should be proud of everything you accomplish along the way, not just the destination itself. So be happy when you complete one assignment or find sources for an essay, don’t just focus on the overall grade at the end of the year.

2. Set goals. Early in the semester, you need to establish what you want to accomplish this school year. Whether that be study more or go out less, you need to make and write down a plan right off the bat. 

3. Don’t get discouraged. We all mess up. We all get behind in school work or break one of the rules we set for ourselves. That’s just a part of life. DO NOT use this as an excuse to give up though. Just start doing it again the next day. It won’t be the end of the world unless you give up complete. 

4. Do things sooner rather than later. Try to get your work done as soon as possible. When you get home from school, take a short break, and I mean SHORT, and then get your assignments done for the day. That way, you can just relax and chill until you go to bed, rather than pulling an all nighter if something ends up taking longer than expected. 

5. Procrastinate with other work. Let’s say you don’t want to read a chapter of a book for a class. Well, before doing that, go ahead and clean your room and practice your violin. If you’re going to procrastinate, do it with something worthwhile, rather than spending hours on tumblr. At least that’s a few less things you have to do later on. 

i. write a to-do list and prioritize it.

whether it be in an agenda book/planner, bullet journal, or your phone, you’ll need to write tasks down so you don’t forget and not have to backtrack! then, find a way to prioritize your tasks, typically i organize it by subject and then by urgency using stars to indicate how important it is. however, find a priority system that works for you the best and stick with it! once you do that, reorganize your to-do list in order of priority and you can start going down the list.

ii. know your constants.

constants are things that usually happen every day. constants include sleeping, eating, classes, extracurriculars, jobs, etc. write down all the times you have to do these things/want to do these things, so you can take it into account when scheduling other tasks. for instance, if you know that an extracurricular will keep you an extra hour away from home, organize ways to do your homework in school (i.e. at lunch) or know that you might have to sacrifice a task or two to keep yourself on schedule.

iii. be mindful of limits and events.

it’s okay to say “yes” to hang out with your friends and opportunities. but if you know it’ll feel more like a burden, if you have something important to study for, and ultimately if you’ll be more stressed out if you go — then say no. make sure that you can handle taking some time out if you say yes! when you add events that you say yes to, incorporate it into planning and treat it as a constant, because most likely that plan won’t change much in terms of time. appointments with doctors or dentists should also be treated like constants as well! (don’t let school consume you entirely but also hold yourself back if you know you need to study/prepare.)

iv. set specific times for each task & learn to adapt!

if you don’t tell yourself when to begin and when to end, you’ll never get to either place, and you won’t be as organized or as motivated to finish on time. think about how much time it will take you to complete a task, and give yourself at most a half hour extra–just in case something unforeseen comes into play, it won’t shift your entire schedule. write these times down next to the things on your list. set alarms if you want to! keep in mind that you’ll probably need to move tasks to the next day, so you’ll need to adapt accordingly.

make sure to check off tasks as you go so you know that you completed it. it’ll make you more productive seeing your progress too!

v. create study times.

try your best to organize regular studying time into your schedule. even if it’s just for an hour or two to brush up on one or two subjects, studying regularly will keep the information in your head. make sure to find room for extra time to study the subject you have the hardest time on. add more study time as you get closer to the date of a quiz/test/exam, too!

vi. use deadlines to your advantage.

always set deadlines two days early (or earlier). getting ahead of deadlines will help you relax in the end and procrastination won’t be as harsh. plus, it gives you more time to tweak an essay, practice a presentation, etc. if you have it done earlier — not to say that you shouldn’t have already done this prior to your created deadline! especially for projects or essays, try and break up tasks into even smaller tasks so you know the exact steps you need to take. for instance, instead of saying “Work on English essay,” split it into “Research for essay,” “Outline essay,” “Write intro paragraph,” etc., and make sure you have specific deadlines for those too so you don’t leave all those small tasks to the last minute.

vii. take a break!

if you don’t take breaks, you’ll end up burning out. even though school may seem in priority, you are always the number one priority. if you don’t feel well physically or mentally, then give yourself some time to relax. read a book, take a bath–whatever helps you destress. i always try and take a break for a half-hour in between long work sessions, and shorter breaks in between a couple of shorter tasks. sometimes, i use the pomodoro method! insert breaks into your schedule so you have some time to yourself. during one of these breaks, you can do something as simple as organizing your desk if it’s a mess to keep yourself productive and relieve some stress if a clean study space is required for you to be motivated and focused. you can also exercise, drink water, or get up and walk around a bit during these breaks too!

viii. get some sleep.

Sleep is important. The average teenager needs about nine hours of sleep, and in general, adults need seven to nine hours. Figure out when you want to wake up in the morning, and count back the hours. Try and start to unwind (stop doing work, get ready for bed) about a half an hour before you sleep. Read a book, check social media briefly–just something that lets you relax and eases you into sleep. Waking up, set a few sets of alarms to go off anywhere in 10-20 minute intervals, just in case you don’t wake up or to start waking you up sooner so you’re actually awake by the time you want to and your body is less drowsy.

ix. focus on the task.

- put a clock in front of you so you are aware of the time you’re spending! a calendar would also be useful to help visualize your deadlines.

- put your phone on airplane mode, do not disturb, turn it off, etc. and put it on the other side of the room so you can focus on the tasks at hand. personally, i use bluetooth headphones so i can listen to music from my phone while it’s away and so i don’t have to break out my laptop which is full of distractions.

- take note of how much time is lost due to deviating from a task so you realize what distracts you and how to remove yourself from those distractions.

- sit down with all the materials you’ll need for studying before beginning so you won’t interrupt your focus looking for a notebook.

good luck and get to work!

+ more resources

A lot of you ask how to manage your time efficiently and properly organise your work. We all know it’s impossible to stay motivated and organised all the time, but there are some tricks, that we decided to share, that could at least improve the way we manage our time.

1. Use your calendar
You can either stick with the traditional paper version or use a calendar on your phone (Goolge Calendar is a winner for me). Whichever you choose remember to record all of your classes, meetings, deadlines and activities for a week (I strongly recommend to do a brief plan of your week on Sunday afternoon or evening). This way you will see when you have any spare time to fit your studying in. Hovewer remember to leave some time for unexpected events that might show up.

2. Morning planning
Each morning spend 5 minutes (or 10 if you’re a very busy person) to plan your day. You can make a time log by dividing the day into hours, if it seems more clear for you. Don’t start any task or check your phone before you get your schedule fixed, because it will get you distracted and time will only fly.

3. Make a to-do list
In order not to cover up my whole calendar with tasks I prefer to make a to-do list each day on a different sheet of paper and stick it above my desk. That way everytime I look up I remind myself of the tasks I want to accomplish. I write down a lot of things, but there’s a trick I’ve learned one time: don’t write down things that take less than 5 minutes to do. Just do them the moment they come up to your mind and move onto other chores. It really does save a lot of time.

4. Block out distractions
There can’t be anything worse than the moment you realise you’re scrolling through your Facebook or Tumblr again (!) instead of studying. The temptation to check social media is the worst when you need your computer to write an assay or a report. There are some great Chrome extensions that block sites that distract you, such as StayFocused or Cold Turkey. You set a time afer which they are blocked and you can’t visit then anymore. Great tool!

5. Hide your phone
It’s also extremely tempting to check your phone all the time, you know just to check if someone liked your new Instagram photo ;) But a quick check usually turns into minutes (or even hours) of scrolling through social media and funny websites. The best idea is to put your phone away so you don’t see it, possibly in a different room. However, if you’re in the library or a coffee shop it’s impossible to do so. In those cases, you can either leave your phone hidden in your bag or use one of the “productivity apps”, such as Forest or Chicken Clock.

6. Know your productive hours
If you happen to have a free day form school during the week you probably want to use it to catch up on some studying. The same applies to weekends. A great number of us are most productive and focused in the morning and early afternoon. That’s when we should plan to do our most demanding assignments. When we’re done with them we can then move onto some smaller tasks that don’t require as much focusing.

7. Make a revision schedule
—> This one’s really important!
A couple of weeks before your exams sit down with your list of exam topics in one hand and your coursebook in the other. Now mark all the chapters or sections in the book that you’ll need to go through for the exam and count the total amount of pages you’ll need to learn. Then divide the number of pages by the number of days you want to spend studying this subject. You’ll get a number of pages you need to cover each day. Then write down in your calendar what section you’re going to learn each day (if you have enough time plan some rest days too!). I find this method extremely helpful in order not to get overwhelmed by the huge amount of work to do and divide my studying into a lot smaller chunks. It’s also super useful at times when I’m feeling totally unmotivated, because I get up and try to do my work anyway.

8. Take regular breaks
It’s impossible to work for 4 hours straight without taking a single break (or maybe it’s possible, but the next day you’ll feel dead). Divide your study material into smaller chunks and after completing each part get a short break. Go make yourself a cup of tea or strech a little. After clearing your mind you’ll quickly get back to work with a better attitude.

9. Review your progress
Regularly go through your to-do list and calendar to see if your tasks are being achieved. Award yourself with little things is you accomplish your goals and see that you have used your time wisely. But don’t ever punish yourself if you didn’t manage to do everything! We’re only humans and sometimes despite the greatest organisation we can’t manage to cover everything.

10. Be realistic
As I’ve said above, don’t get frustrated when you happen not to get everything done as you’ve planned. Sure being organised is great, but don’t let a schedule dictate your life! Take an unplanned day off, have some me-time or randomly meet up with a friend. You’ll see that the next time you get down to work, you’ll have double as much power to get things done.

Good luck!

~gomedorgohome

Watch HOW TO MANAGE YOUR TIME BETTER here.

We are wasting it, we are enjoying it, we want more of it and sometimes it flies: Time - the most precious thing we have. 

I’m sure you have said and heard the words “I don’t have enough time for that!“ plenty of times. Here’s what I think about it: it’s to 100% avoidable. Time is an illusion. We always have it when it comes down to it, and today I’m sharing 5 tips on how to make this thesis a fact

  1. Prioritise and make it a necessity. Take reading a book or going to the gym as serious as going to work or doing the groceries.
  2. Include the things you want to do in your time schedule and more important: Exclude the things you don’t wanna do. Saying “no” can be hard, but as long as you make your decision about opinion instead of feelings, nobody will get hurt in the progress and you’ll benefit.
  3. Don’t stress out about things before you actually need to do them. Enjoy the time you spend on something you like, and when it comes to the less funny part, give it your full attention and get it done.
  4. Chunk your “to do’s” down in one hour time frames (the amount of time our brain is able to focus on one thing). That way you’ll take it step by step and provide overwhelm.
  5. Our best friend: flight mode & “do not disturb”. You won’t believe how much your phone and especially social media is slowing you down in getting things done (even subconsciously). Get all kind of distractions out of your way.

My favourite tip is #1 though - it works so good. You know why? Lets do a little experiment

You tell yourself every day that you’re too busy with “important” things and don’t have the time to tidy up your room. You’ll eventually handle it until one day where you need to be at an appointment at 6 am - and suddenly can’t find your keys. You spend 35 minutes panically turning your room upside down until you finally sight them under your pillow (how did that even … ?) - anyways, the point is: You just spent 35 minutes. 35 minutes you were sure you wouldn’t have. You might be super stressed and late (what could’ve been avoided by making tidy up your room a priority) but the necessity of you needing your keys in order to leave the house made you having the time you were not supposed to have. Mind-blowing, isn’t it? Therefore, time is nothing but an illusion and the quote

“I don’t have time” really means “it’s not my priority.”

is on point. I hope those tips will help you get the most out of your time and achieve everything you want to. For more, check out this video.
You’ll hear more from me soon gorgeous, xx

So what is time management?
It’s when you know you have a test next week and you don’t want to cram for the test again. Managing your time will let you study for the test an hour a day, instead of 5 hours in one day.

How do I manage my time?
The basic idea is that you create some sort of schedule, or plan, for your day. Then you stick to it. Here’s some tips on creating the schedule, and then staying with it.

I. Keeping track

  • Keep a planner. This will let you easily see what you need to have done by the end of the week!
  • I keep a todo list of what I need to finish for the day. Mine is simple to avoid overloading my brain. For today I wrote “Finish Math homework. Finish Electronics Lab report. Study Physics”.
  • I don’t write down exact times that I do my homework. I tried this earlier, and found it was too challenging to keep to such a strict schedule. My workflow works best when I can choose what to work on, and when I can work on it.
  • Some people will find that having too much freedom in their schedule will be challenging to follow. In that case, they would prefer a strict schedule saying to do homework at a specific time.
  • You need to find out what works for you, everyone is different. Try a technique, and move on if it’s not working.
  • I color code my life so that I know what I need done at a glance.
  • Determine what’s urgent. If I have a test the next day and homework due in two days, I’m going to use that day for studying for the test.
  • Tasks with a stricter deadline should be done first.
  • Tasks worth more of your grade should have more time allocated for it.
  • Allocate time when you have the most energy. I have the most energy mid-day, so I try to do my schoolwork after lunch, before dinner.

II. Staying on track

  • Don’t overload yourself and say you’ll finish 2 projects and 60 pages of reading in one day. This is what time management is for in the first place.
  • Break it up! That 60 pages of reading can be 20 pages over 3 days.
  • Start small if you’re new to this. Overtime it will be easier to allocate tasks since you’ll have experience with managing your time. At first you can simply say “Today I will write the first 200 words of the essay.” and then work up to larger tasks once you’re used to allocating time.
  • The hardest part is starting! Our brains create this dread with schoolwork, but once we start it’s never as bad as we make it seem.
  • Find out why you’re not starting your homework, and then learn to overcome it.
  • My fear of starting stems from a fear of failure since I’m a perfectionist. I overcame this fear by reminding myself that starting is better than nothing at all.
  • Reward yourself once you finish a task, or when you stay on schedule.
  • Getting off schedule is not the end of the world! Time management will let you make up for the time lost! Usually it’s a sign of stress when you miss work, so find what the cause is.
  • I would miss work in high school because I was afraid I would never understand the topic so I didn’t bother starting. This is a bad idea ™   since the work is there to help you practice and you will start understanding the topic once you practice!
  • Schedule time for breaks! It’s easier to have a guilt-free break when you put the time in to take a break!
  • Have a “Do nothing” day. On fridays I don’t do any schoolwork. I relax and enjoy the day. This lets my brain rest after a long week, and I get to enjoy my time with friends.
  • Have fun with it! I love checking off things I did and looking back at the week with checkmarks everywhere!
  • Check what you need done in the morning so that it’s on your mind and you can start planning your day.
  • Not every second of everyday needs to be allocated to schoolwork! If you have a 20 minute break between classes, relax! It’s better to give you brain a break and to feel better than to fill your entire day down to the minute with learning.
  • Don’t multitask. Allocate time for both tasks so that you can focus on a specific task.