Through-A-Lens-Darkly

I realized while watching Daria, “Through a Lens Darkly”, there is a very future seeing moment when Daria, a misfit who doesn’t want to be identified by her looks, gets contacts, and Kevin, a dumb jock who wants to appear smarter, get glasses. Jane says, “Why yes, he’s wearing glasses, although, ironically, he doesn’t need them.”

I feel like this is the hipster movement in a nutshell. Trying to come off as an intellectual when in reality they are pseudo intellectuals and lame brained morons who only care about how they look to others. I really don’t care for hipsters. And I don’t mean anyone who wears a beanie or who eats only organic food. A person can wear glasses and not be a hipster. The difference is that I wear glasses because I have bad eyesight and I dislike contacts. A hipster wears glasses because they think it makes them look cooler or smarter, despite the fact they don’t need them. They don’t care about the reason behind what they wear or say or do, they just do it because they think it’s the cool and smart thing to do. And in this generation, it’s cool to be “uncool”; the opposite of what we in high school considered cool. It’s now cooler to be weird and different and smart. But the problem is, everyone follows the trend where it’s not unique anymore. It’s not uncool if it’s the cool thing to do. It’s a bit of a run around.

Through a Lens Darkly, a must-see film by Thomas Allen Harris, 10 years in the making. 

“Our salvation as a people, as a culture, depends on salving the wounds of this war. A war of images within the American family album.”

See trailer: http://1world1family.me/through-a-lens-darkly/

For screening schedule & Digital Diaspora Roadshow: http://1world1family.me

Full film title: Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People

Unidentified Woman with Camera, circa 1935. Hand tinted gelatin silver print from the ICP’s Cowin Collection of African-American Vernacular Photography.

Probably intended as an advertisement for a photographer’s studio or for a new product, this large hand-colored portrait shows a female photographer holding a bulky Speed Graphic, the camera of choice for news photographers in the 1930s.

2

This is another MUST SEE doc…

Through A Lens Darkly: Black Photographers And The Emergence Of A People…

“A film that explores how African American communities have used the camera as a tool for social change from the invention of photography to the present. This epic tale poetically moves between the present and the past, through contemporary photographers and artists whose images and stories seek to reconcile legacies of pride and shame while giving voice to images long suppressed, forgotten, and hidden from sight…”

Inspired by Deborah Willis’s book, Reflections in Black, filmmaker Thomas Allen Harris casts a broad net with Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People and begins with his family album. The film is a cornucopia of Americana that reveals deeply disturbing truths about the history of race relations while expressing joyous, life-affirming sentiments about the ability of artists and amateurs alike to assert their identity through the photographic lens…

…Through a Lens Darkly" demonstrates, it’s only through the eyes of black photographers that we see differently. With the thousand words vividly painted through each picture, we connect, identify and find solidarity… Some of the black photographers’ works here are breathtaking — and may prompt you to hunt down Willis’ book for the coffee table. But there’s so much more to take away from Harris’ documentary. It unequivocally confirms the necessity of diversity in media, the business of image making. With some of the most successful television shows this fall boasting people of color in front of and behind the camera, a centuries-old paradigm has only just begun to shift..

See also:

– See 6min. YouTube trailer of the doc HERE

1world1family.me – Digital Diaspora Family Reunion and 1World1Family social media campaign, the companion transmedia project to Through A Lens Darkly, engages audiences to discover connections between their own family archives and the film’s historical narrative, thus creating new communal linkages that underlie our common humanity.

–  NPR

Democracy NOW

After her nightmare, Daria goes to the bathroom and was going to put on her contact lenses again, but decided not to. And she decided not to wear glasses either. She goes blind throughout the rest of the episode.

Taken from the 27th episode “Through a Lens Darkly” from the third season of “Daria”.

NOTE: In the actual episode, this is what she actually said when she was going to put on contact lenses and did not say “Oh No! I’m so ugly!” at all because it was never heard throughout (meaning it’s a fake quote).

Director Thomas Allen Harris first attended the Festival in 2002 with his documentary That’s My Face and most recently returned to premiere Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People during the 2014 Sundance Film Festival.

A rich and lyrical tapestry that is both personal and epic in scope, Thomas Allen Harris’s extraordinary documentary is a unique examination of the way black photographers—and their subjects—have used the camera as a tool for social change from the time photography was invented to the present.  Through a Lens Darkly is a powerful and elegant engagement with the burden of representation and serves as a testament to the redemptive powers of creativity.

Through a Lens Darkly is part of a larger transmedia project that includes the website/traveling roadshow Digital Diaspora Family Reunion, which invites audiences to share and upload their own family photographs and participate in the creation of a national family archive that can form communities.

You can catch Through a Lens Darkly at NYC’s Film Forum August 27 – September 9 and learn more about the Digital Diaspora Roadshow here.

Photo by Thomas Sayers Ellis

youtube

Through a Lens Darkly: Screening and Talkback
Monday, January 26, 2015, 6:30PM to 8:30PM

Inspired by Deborah Willis’s book, Reflections in Black, filmmaker Thomas Allen Harris casts a broad net with Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People and begins with his family album. The film is a cornucopia of Americana that reveals deeply disturbing truths about the history of race relations while expressing joyous, life-affirming sentiments about the ability of artists and amateurs alike to assert their identity through the photographic lens. A conversation moderated by Shola Lynch with Dr. Deborah Willis and and Thomas Allen Harris will follow the screening.

Watch the Official Trailer!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o4Kd1GfkfW4

For more information or to register visit: http://bit.ly/1zjgeYM

Support your local businesses! Make your donation to the “Through A Lens Darkly” documentary before midnight Friday 7/27 - http://bit.ly/L06o6j - Thank You!
- - - - - - 
Title: S.J. Gilpin shoe store, Richmond, Virginia
Summary: Mail carrier and six other men posed standing at entrance to shop.
Date: 1899?
Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division
African American Photographs Assembled for 1900 Paris Exposition 
Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-99053

Through A Lens Darkly is my favourite episode of Daria of all time. It teaches us that vanity is not a sin, that everyone has a smidge of vanity and pride in them. I find myself worried about how confident I wish I was because I knew if I took the time to look my best and be confident in myself and love myself, I would be absolutely shamed for it. There’s such a thing as loving yourself and being able to care for and love others at the same time. One side of society is telling people - especially women - that being confident and happy with yourself is important. The other side is telling us that confidence and loving oneself is arrogant and shameful. Where’s the middle ground?

Daria - Um, I wanted to ask your advice about something. I’m thinking about getting contact lenses.

Aunt Amy - Uh-huh, sounds good.

Daria - It does?

Aunt Amy - Why not?

Daria - Well, isn’t it kind of… vain?

Aunt Amy - Do you have mirrors in your house, Daria?

Daria - Yeah.

Aunt Amy - Do you look in them before you go out?

Daria - Yeah.

Aunt Amy - Well, then, you’re already going to hell, so you might as well get the lenses; you’ll see the brimstone better.

Daria - What do you mean?

Aunt Amy - I mean, having contacts is no more vain than primping in the mirror. It just gives you different options about the way you look. It wouldn’t change your personality, it wouldn’t change your values, and it would set your parents back a couple hundred bucks. So, I don’t see any downside at all.

Also, this image is transparent. Winner.