Thirty-Years-of-a-Time-Lord

Getting to wear fanny packs and foam animal visors around and having people think it’s cool is amazing, but what’s even more amazing was seeing 1,062 salvations and 1,529 baptisms last week. Thirty years from now I will still be talking about that time the invitation was longer than the sermon and the countless miracles that happened. It was my last Gauntlet as a student and I wouldn’t have wanted to spend it with anybody else. I love you girls so much and I can’t wait to see what the Lord has in store for each of us in the future. #gauntletmiracle #gauntletx

Problem: where to fit “The Adventurous Exploit of the Cave of Ali Baba” in the Wimsey canon.

Why? Here’s the dating information given (SPOILERS):

  • Lord Peter “dies” in December at age thirty seven, according to his Morning Post obituary.
  • He returns two years later, in January.

Since Sayers gives his birth year as 1890, this places the “death” in December 1927 and the return in January 1930.

But: Strong Poison is clearly set in December 1929-January 1930, and there’s no way that Lord Peter could be publicly on hand to solve that mystery while still being in hiding.

If we choose to disbelieve that aging, it’s still hard to place. The next several books after Strong Poison take place in relatively quick succession, with no time for a two-year hiatus. Earlier? There is a bit of a gap between Clouds of Witness in October 1924-January 1925 and Unnatural Death and The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club in April/June and November/December 1927. But then where do many of the short stories in Lord Peter Views the Body go?

I’ve seen one timeline that ignores the return in January and thus places the hiatus from December 1927 to December 1929, presumably just before the events of Strong Poison–which is cutting it pretty close.

Or is the story even an actual in-universe event? No one ever mentions it in any of the subsequent books. Surprising, since a faked death and a dramatic return are rather major events.

So how do we solve this one? Am I missing something?

“Well, I’m Irish. I’m from Ireland and I’m sort of proud that I could come to a nice city like Edmonton. I’m from the north of Ireland … there was a lot of trouble there. There was a lot of trouble back thirty, forty years now, so that’s why I had to come here. There was a lot of IRA trouble.”

“Was it a scary time?”

“Well, I was a policeman back in those days. Yeah, it was a very dangerous job. I can tell ya that. A lot of people were killed.”

“Do you ever go back there?”

“I was back this year. I saw Prince Charles. He went to Mullaghmore—that’s where his great uncle was assassinated. They put a bomb on the boat, and it blew Lord Mountbatten up. That’s not actually that far from my home, so I went there and saw him shake hands. He’s a small, wee man, Prince Charles. I thought he was a tall man, but he must be five foot six. The Queen is very small also.”

18th July 2015 - Mass Readings (U.S.A.) - Saturday of Week Fifteen in Ordinary Time or Saint Camillus of Lellis, Priest.

Saturday of Week Fifteen in Ordinary Time.

First reading

Exodus 12:37-42

The children of Israel set out from Rameses for Succoth, about six hundred thousand men on foot, not counting the little ones. A crowd of mixed ancestry also went up with them, besides their livestock, very numerous flocks and herds. Since the dough they had brought out of Egypt was not leavened, they baked it into unleavened loaves. They had rushed out of Egypt and had no opportunity even to prepare food for the journey.
The time the children of Israel had stayed in Egypt was four hundred and thirty years. At the end of four hundred and thirty years, all the hosts of the LORD left the land of Egypt on this very date. This was a night of vigil for the LORD, as he led them out of the land of Egypt; so on this same night all the children of Israel must keep a vigil for the LORD throughout their generations.


Responsorial Psalm

Psalm 136:1,23-24,10-12,13-15

R/ His mercy endures forever.
or
R/.Alleluia.

Give thanks to the LORD, for he is good,
for his mercy endures forever;
Who remembered us in our abjection,
for his mercy endures forever;
And freed us from our foes,
for his mercy endures forever.

R/ His mercy endures forever.
or
R/ Alleluia.

Who smote the Egyptians in their first-born,
for his mercy endures forever;
And brought out Israel from their midst,
for his mercy endures forever;
With a mighty hand and an outstretched arm,
for his mercy endures forever.

R/ His mercy endures forever.
or
R/ Alleluia.

Who split the Red Sea in twain,
for his mercy endures forever;
And led Israel through its midst,
for his mercy endures forever;
But swept Pharaoh and his army into the Red Sea,
for his mercy endures forever.

R/ His mercy endures forever.
or
R/ Alleluia.

Gospel Acclamation

2 Corinthians 5:19

Alleluia, alleluia.
God was reconciling the world to himself in Christ,
and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation.
Alleluia, alleluia.


Gospel

Matthew 12:14-21

The Pharisees went out and took counsel against Jesus to put him to death.
When Jesus realized this, he withdrew from that place. Many people followed him, and he cured them all, but he warned them not to make him known. This was to fulfill what had been spoken through Isaiah the prophet:

Behold, my servant whom I have chosen,
my beloved in whom I delight;
I shall place my Spirit upon him,
and he will proclaim justice to the Gentiles.
He will not contend or cry out,
nor will anyone hear his voice in the streets.
A bruised reed he will not break,
a smoldering wick he will not quench,
until he brings justice to victory.
And in his name the Gentiles will hope.

——————


Mass Readings for Saint Camillus of Lellis, Priest

First reading

1 John 3:14-18

Beloved: We know that we have passed from death to life because we love our brothers. Whoever does not love remains in death. Everyone who hates his brother is a murderer, and you know that anyone who is a murderer does not have eternal life remaining in him. The way we came to know love was that he laid down his life for us; so we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers. If someone who has worldly means sees a brother in need and refuses him compassion, how can the love of God remain in him? Children, let us love not in word or speech but in deed and truth.


Responsorial Psalm

Psalm 112:1bc-2,3-4,5-7a,7b-8,9

R/ Blessed the man who fears the Lord.
or
R/ Alleluia.

Blessed the man who fears the LORD,
who greatly delights in his commands.
His posterity shall be mighty upon the earth;
the upright generation shall be blessed.

R/ Blessed the man who fears the Lord.
or
R/ Alleluia.

Wealth and riches shall be in his house;
his generosity shall endure forever.
Light shines through the darkness for the upright;
he is gracious and merciful and just.

R/ Blessed the man who fears the Lord.
or
R/ Alleluia.

Well for the man who is gracious and lends,
who conducts his affairs with justice;
He shall never be moved;
the just man shall be in everlasting remembrance.

R/ Blessed the man who fears the Lord.
or
R/ Alleluia.

An evil report he shall not fear.
His heart is firm, trusting in the LORD.
His heart is steadfast; he shall not fear
till he looks down upon his foes.

R/ Blessed the man who fears the Lord.
or
R/ Alleluia.

Lavishly he gives to the poor,
his generosity shall endure forever;
his horn shall be exalted in glory.

R/ Blessed the man who fears the Lord.
or
R/ Alleluia.

Gospel Acclamation

John 13:34

Alleluia, alleluia.
I give you a new commandment:
love one another as I have loved you.
Alleluia, alleluia.

Gospel

John 15:9-17

Jesus said to his disciples: “As the Father loves me, so I also love you. Remain in my love. If you keep my commandments, you will remain in my love, just as I have kept my Father’s commandments and remain in his love.
“I have told you this so that my joy might be in you and your joy might be complete. This is my commandment: love one another as I love you. No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends. You are my friends if you do what I command you. I no longer call you slaves, because a slave does not know what his master is doing. I have called you friends, because I have told you everything I have heard from my Father. It was not you who chose me, but I who chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit that will remain, so that whatever you ask the Father in my name he may give you. This I command you: love one another.”

Broтнerнood

holymurderer

           This thirty-first day of November in the year of our Lord, 1462
      ❝ My dear friend, our time in Budapest was a success, so declares                    my father. ‘That man is truly here by the hand of God’, he says about you.  The training of our men and what evil we have purged from the land has been  fulfilling with you by my side. I invite you to take leave of Budapest, as I have,  and join me for a time at my home of Valerious. From there we are tasked to    take the troops from Budapest to Istanbul. It has only been seven days since      we were last in each other’s company, but my family insists you come.
                                                                Your friend,
                                                                              Vlad❞   

Winter had coated the land of Transylvania in blankets of pure snow. The trees were barren, roads were in poor condition - but, the home of Valerious was warm and life buzzed about within its walls. Amid Vlad’s father orchestrating servants to clean, cook and make while a dark-haired man sat with his leg across a chair’s arm, book in hand (while the other played with an earring) – utterly absorbed in its pages. He was dressed in simple clothes: a loose white shirt, calf-length brown trousers and his long hair draped over his shoulders

“How can you read when we have guest coming?!” A man, tall with long hair and equally long mustache with a scar over his right eye pouted. 

Vlad looked up with a gentle smile and chuckled, “Father, the house is as clean as you can get it and I haven’t had the simple pleasure to read in months. I’ve been training men and killing men – can I enjoy a moment of humane activity?” There was a long pause before the pair of men laughed at one another’s previous exchange of words. 

“It is very good…very good to have you home, if only for a little while, my son. I would be on those fields with you if only these old bones would allow it. Now,” he cleared his throat, being a touch more serious, “sit properly-!” he swat at Vlad’s leg on the chair’s arm, “you were raised better than that,” a laugh escaped him as he then pulled Vlad into his arms and embraced him, patting him on the back.

Vlad hissed in pain, for his father had made contact with a still-fresh wound. “It will heal…all wounds heal,” Valerious the Elder commented, pointing to the scar across his eye before nodding his head affectionately and parted down a hall, ordering servants about.

The prince sat back down and reopened his book - a book of fighting methods and weaponry.

My Saturday Daily Blessings

July 18, 2015

Be still quiet your heart and mind, the LORD is here, loving you talking to you………..

Saturday of the Fifteenth Week in Ordinary Time (Roman Rite Calendar)

First Reading: Ex 12:37-42

The children of Israel set out from Rameses for Succoth, about six hundred thousand men on foot, not counting the little ones.

A crowd of mixed ancestry also went up with them, besides their livestock, very numerous flocks and herds.

Since the dough they had brought out of Egypt was not leavened, they baked it into unleavened loaves.

They had rushed out of Egypt and had no opportunity even to prepare food for the journey.

The time the children of Israel had stayed in Egypt was four hundred and thirty years.

At the end of four hundred and thirty years, all the hosts of the LORD left the land of Egypt on this very date.

This was a night of vigil for the LORD, as he led them out of the land of Egypt; so on this same night all the children of Israel must keep a vigil for the LORD throughout their generations.

Responsorial Psalm: Psalm 136:1 and 23-24, 10-12, 13-15

   “His mercy endures forever.”

Verse before the Gospel: 2 Cor 5:19

Alleluia, Alleluia

“God was reconciling the world to himself in Christ, and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation.”

Alleluia, Alleluia

Gospel: Mt 12:14-21

The Pharisees went out and took counsel against Jesus to put him to death.

When Jesus realized this, he withdrew from that place.
Many people followed him, and he cured them all, but he warned them not to make him known.This was to fulfill what had been spoken through Isaiah the prophet:

Behold, my servant whom I have chosen,my beloved in whom I delight; I shall place my Spirit upon him, and he will proclaim justice to the Gentiles. He will not contend or cry out, nor will anyone hear his voice in the streets.

A bruised reed he will not break, a smoldering wick he will not quench, until he brings justice to victory.
And in his name the Gentiles will hope.

*Meditation:

How do we achieve success and victory in our lives? In everyone’s life there are key moments or turning points on which the whole of one’s life hinges. The mounting confrontation between the Pharisees and Jesus was such a decisive event and crisis. The religious leaders became intolerant of Jesus because of their prejudice. Nothing that Jesus would do or say from this point on would be right in their eyes. They conspired, not simply to oppose Jesus but to eliminate him.

Courage and determination to do God’s will
Jesus met this defiance with courage and determination to do his Father’s will. He used the crisis to teach his disciples an important lesson for God’s way to success and victory. The only way to glory in God’s kingdom is through the cross - the cross of suffering and humiliation - which Jesus endured for our sake and for our salvation. We, too, are called to take up our cross every day - to die to sin, selfishness, envy, pride, strife, and hatred - and to lay down our lives in humble service and love for one another, just as Jesus did for our sake.

Matthew quotes from the “Suffering Servant” prophecies of Isaiah to explain how Jesus the Messiah would accomplish his mission - not through crushing power - but through love and sacrificial service (Isaiah 42:1-4). In place of a throne Jesus chose to mount the cross and wear a crown of thorns. He was crucified as our Lord and King (John 19:19; Philippians 2:11) There is no greater proof of God’s love for us than the sacrificial death of his only begotten Son for our sake and our salvation (John 3:16).

Jesus died not only for the Jews but for all the Gentile nations as well. Isaiah had prophesied centuries before, that the Messiah would bring justice to the Gentiles. To the Greek mind, justice involved giving to God and to one’s fellow citizen that which is their due (whatever is owed to them). Jesus taught his disciples to give God not only his due, but to love him without measure just as he loves us unconditionally - without limits or reservation.

Justice tempered with love and mercy
Jesus brings the justice of God’s kingdom tempered with divine love and mercy. He does not bruise the weak or treat them with contempt, but rather shows understanding and compassion. He does not discourage the fainthearted but gives hope, courage, and the strength to persevere through trying circumstances. No trials, failings, and weaknesses can keep us from the mercy and help which Jesus offers to everyone who asks. His grace is sufficient for every moment, every situation, and every challenge we face. When you meet trials and difficulties, do you rely on God’s help and grace?

**Prayer:

“Lord Jesus, your love and mercy knows no bounds. Give me strength when I am weak, hope when I am discouraged, peace when I am troubled, consolation when I am sad, and understanding when I am perplexed. Make me an instrument of your love and peace to those who are troubled and without hope."Amen.

Sources:

Lectionary for Mass for Use in the Dioceses of the United States, second typical edition, Copyright © 2001, 1998, 1997, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine; Psalm refrain © 1968, 1981, 1997, International Committee on English in the Liturgy, Inc. All rights reserved. Neither this work nor any part of it may be reproduced, distributed, performed or displayed in any medium, including electronic or digital, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

**

Meditations may be freely reprinted for non-commercial use. Cite copyright & source: www.dailyscripture.net author

Don Schwager

© 2015 Servants of the Word

18th July 2015 - Mass Readings (UK, Ireland, Canada, Australia, NZ) - Saturday of Fifteenth Week in Ordinary Time.

Saturday of Fifteenth Week in Ordinary Time.

First reading

Exodus 12:37-42

The sons of Israel left Rameses for Succoth, about six hundred thousand on the march – all men – not counting their families. People of various sorts joined them in great numbers; there were flocks, too, and herds in immense droves. They baked cakes with the dough which they had brought from Egypt, unleavened because the dough was not leavened; they had been driven out of Egypt, with no time for dallying, and had not provided themselves with food for the journey. The time that the sons of Israel had spent in Egypt was four hundred and thirty years. And on the very day the four hundred and thirty years ended, all the array of the Lord left the land of Egypt. The night, when the Lord kept vigil to bring them out of the land of Egypt, must be kept as a vigil in honour of the Lord for all their generations.

The Word of The Lord.

Responsorial Psalm

Psalm 135:1,10-15,23-24

R/ Great is his love, love without end.
Or
R/ Alleluia.

O give thanks to the Lord for he is good.

R/ Great is his love, love without end.
Or
R/ Alleluia.

He remembered us in our distress.

R/ Great is his love, love without end.
Or
R/ Alleluia.

And he snatched us away from our foes.

R/ Great is his love, love without end.
Or
R/ Alleluia.

The first-born of the Egyptians he smote.

R/ Great is his love, love without end.
Or
R/ Alleluia.

He brought Israel out from their midst.

R/ Great is his love, love without end.
Or
R/ Alleluia.

Arm outstretched, with power in his hand.

R/ Great is his love, love without end.
Or
R/ Alleluia.

He divided the Red Sea in two.

R/ Great is his love, love without end.
Or
R/ Alleluia.

He made Israel pass through the midst.

R/ Great is his love, love without end.
Or
R/ Alleluia.

He flung Pharaoh and his force in the sea.

R/ Great is his love, love without end.
Or
R/ Alleluia.

Gospel Acclamation

Psalm 118:27

Alleluia, alleluia!
Make me grasp the way of your precepts,
and I will muse on your wonders.
Alleluia!

Or

2 Corinthians 5:19

Alleluia, alleluia!
God in Christ was reconciling the world to himself,
and he has entrusted to us the news that they are reconciled.
Alleluia!

Gospel

Matthew 12:14-21

The Pharisees went out and began to plot against him, discussing how to destroy him.
Jesus knew this and withdrew from the district. Many followed him and he cured them all, but warned them not to make him known. This was to fulfil the prophecy of Isaiah:

Here is my servant whom I have chosen,
my beloved, the favourite of my soul.
I will endow him with my spirit,
and he will proclaim the true faith to the nations.
He will not brawl or shout,
nor will anyone hear his voice in the streets.
He will not break the crushed reed,
nor put out the smouldering wick
till he has led the truth to victory:
in his name the nations will put their hope.

The Gospel of the Lord.