Third-person

9

You think there is a chance they’ll bring her back in the Ultra Sun and Ultra Moon? :D (Edit: I know it won’t happen but I can dream)


(i was studying scary faces from Jitsu Wa Watashi Wa manga so it was perfect to try it on her)

My best movies ever:

1. Chatroom
2. Prozac Nation
3. Trainspotting
4. SLC Punk
5. Requiem for a dream
6. Third person
7. Girl, interrupted
8. Wir Kinder vom Bahnhof Zoo
9. Mr. Nobody
10. Nowhere boy
11. Breakfast at Tiffany’s
12. Reality bites
13. Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind
14. Buffalo 66
15. Sid & Nancy
16. The silence of the lambs

EDIT: 17. On the edge of innocence
spreading the love ❤️💜💙💚💛

Misha and the whole cast of SPN inspired me to do this. There is too much hate in this world so I want to spread a little bit of love.

I just want to tag some of you who I’ve connected with on here. Even if we just said hi to each other. I would tag everyone of my followers and people I follow because you’re all awesome but then I’d probably have about a thousand. So here a few amazing blogs:

@beautiful-bees- Dani I love you @justrandomspnstuff- Lindsay you’re the sweetest @spnjohnlocked @celestialrebel @castielinparadise @perfmishka @conquestcastiel @justanearth-boundmisfit @royalrowena @mishasfreckledkitten @zeeimpalaangel- love you- I love seeing you on my activity feed- you’re so sweet- @deservetobesaved @chibi-lie- thanks for showing my blog so much love @saviordean @weallneedcastiel @rosewhipped22- I don’t think we talked much but I think you are amazing @weathergirl83 @spnjohnlocked @haven3333- I love that you have so much Misha content @castiel-junkie @acewinchesters- you just make me happy even though we haven’t talked much @euclase- your art is phenomenal @elizabethrobertajones- I love your positivity and metas @inacatastrophicmind- you always have amazing content @mishasminions @elicedraws- aaaah, you are just the sweetest and your art is so adorable @sketchydean- I love your comics @unfortunatecas @unicornmish @yourfavoritedirector- your blog is awesome- I love everything you post

OMG I got carried away. I’m just inspired by each and every one of you. Always know that you are not alone.

Quick Writing Tip: Point of View

As a fiction editor, I read a lot of manuscripts by beginning fiction writers that fall flat because they haven’t settled on a clear and consistent point of view for their story. In my experience, many new writers take point of view for granted, focusing instead on plot, character, and world-building. While those elements are important, too, point of view, in my opinion, is one of the most crucial (and complicated!) elements of storytelling. Simply stated, if you don’t have a clear point of view, you don’t have a clear story.

But if you’re struggling with it, don’t worry! Point of view can be difficult and take a long time to master. To get you started, here are 6 questions to answer for yourself about the point of view in your story. (If you’re writing with multiple POV, you would want to ask these questions for every POV character in the story):

1. Who speaks?

Is it a main character? The town gossip? The dog? The author? God?

2. To whom?

Who is the narrator speaking to? A reader? Another character in the story? Their dead mother, to whom they are writing a letter (e.g. if the story is in the epistolary form). To the judge and jury?

3. With what tone or attitude?

Sarcastic? Earnest? Deceitful? The narrator’s personality as well as how they view the assumed listener/reader and how they view themselves will inform this. Think about how different the tone of Lolita would have been if Humbert Humbert were writing to Lolita herself about the events, rather than to those who accused him of a crime. If the story is told in past tense, is there a difference between how the narrator viewed the events while they were happening versus how they reflect upon them now?

4. In what form?

Is this narrative a diary? A journal? A steam-of-consciousness? A straight-forward story? A verbal account? A dispatch?

5. At what distance?

Consider intimacy as well as how much time as passed since the events of the story. Is your story told in the present tense, with the narrator revealing every single thought and emotion to the reader? Or is your narrator keeping the reader at a distance and not revealing too much about their inner landscape? If your story is in the past tense, have the events of the story happened 5 years ago? 25? 100? Yesterday?

6. With what limitations?

Whose interior thoughts and feelings does your narrator have access to? Only their own? Every character in the story? What other limitation might they have in their perception of the story? Perhaps they are 95 years old and their memory is fading. Maybe they are a child. They could be sick and unable to leave the house. Or they could be neurodivergent, like the narrator of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time. What limitations does your narrator have in terms of what they can see, hear, do, perceive, and thus report to the reader?

Hope this helps! More writing advice and other literary nonsense @bucketsiler

Writing an immersive third person limited point of view.

What is third person? In third person pov the narrator refers to all character by third-person pronouns, such as he, she, or they. In contrast, first person pov uses the first person pronouns, I and me, for the narrator.

What is third person limited? Third person limited is the alternate to third person omniscient. In third person limited, you have one single pov character narrating the story at any given moment (though you can have as many of these limited pov characters as you want throughout the course of the story), whereas in third person omniscient, there is an omniscient (all knowing) narrator.

Why choose a limited third person pov? 

- The reader forms a stronger, more personal connection to your pov character(s).
- You can easily build suspense because the reader never knows for certain what the non-pov characters are thinking, feeling, or planning.
- You can more easily write an unreliable narrator because your narrator tells things only as they see them, and not as they truly are.

At the end of the day, there is nothing you can’t do with limited if you’re creative and willing to think outside the box. 

So you want to write a good limited third person pov then?

Keep in mind that most of these tips also translate to first person pov. In many ways, third person limited is very similar to first person, because you have a single narrator at any given time, and the reader is confined to that narrator’s interpretation of the world.

Here are some key things you need to remember while writing limited third person: 

Keep reading

To any and all LGBT+ people of color feeling split between being a person of color and a part of the LGBT+ community:

You are not being oversensitive or divisive for calling out racism in LGBT+ spaces, or for calling out anti-LGBT+ bigotry in PoC spaces or race specific spaces.

You are not weak or a coward for choosing not to call out racism in LGBT+ spaces, or for not calling out anti-LGBT+ bigotry in PoC spaces or race specific spaces.

You shouldn’t have to separate your experience as a person of color and a someone who is part of the LGBT+ community to be more palatable or understandable to the majority group.

You can be both a person of color and part of the LBGT+ community and there is nothing wrong with that and nothing wrong with you.

You are perfectly valid in your identity.