The-Music-Snobs

@ people who are music snobs: you are not superior for only listening to music by dead white guys. like im not hurting anyone by jamming to one direction and taylor swift and beyonce so you can go ahead and hop off my dick

u know when 5sos tweet song lyrics and people post screen shots of it like trying to figure out what they meant by it but like there song lyrics???? like michael’s “i almost wish you would have loved me too” is a bowling for soup song and calum’s “sell the kids for food” is nirvana lyrics like how do people not i’m jus t like.. i don’t.. eVEn… likE.. but høW???

The Music Snobs // Episode 014: Erykah Badu

The TMS crew + Badu kick things off with an introspective look into the prolific career of Ghostface Killah and discuss the method behind Tony Starks’ mad genius. Then Arthur, Isaac, Jehan, Scoop, and Erykah examine the long history of image within the music industry and try to draw a line between musicians who have used image to improve their art, and those whose image has overshadowed their music. Finally the crew engages in a wild rapid roundtable that poses an interesting question: What is the one song lyric you’d love to actually say in real life…but know you never will?

just listen..

  • Music Snob:I hate Kanye West because he's a total jerk!
  • Me:Don't you idolize John Lennon?
  • Music Snob:Yeah, but John Lennon is more tale--
  • Me:DON'T EVEN SAY NUTHIN TO BE BOYYYY!

You want more Badu? We got more Badu. Check out this exclusive, bonus edition of The Music Snobs as Arthur, Isaac, Jehan, and Scoop unveil a previously unreleased segment from their conversation with the legendary Erykah Badu. Together, the Snobs and their guest-Snob dive into a unique round table discussion: If you could change one thing about an artist that you feel is holding them back, what would that thing be? Listen to this bonus episode of The Music Snobs to hear the crew + Erykah Badu discuss the “fatal flaws” of some of their favorite artists.

Nah, no because once I realize that people aren’t really looking for a savior they’re looking for somebody who looks like one, then, anybody can fit that bill. I’m not- thats not my business, I’m not interested in that business. I’m interested in evolving and people who want to evolve along with me can, you know, people who want to critique it can, people who want to use it to write their own pieces and albums and be inspired by it can, people who want to run a tractor over 100 of my CDs can, you know because thats what art is for, its for dialogue, you know the dialogue of whether you like it whether you don’t and to me thats why I do what I do, I do it because I HAVE to, its therapy for me, its how I live…
— 

Erykah Badu’s response to a question on The Music Snobs “Do you find backlash from some of your fan base that has been with you since 97 expecting to see you come out with the headwrap with the drape dress(she says "Yeah definitley” here), do you feel beholden to reach them and try to bring them up through image?“

This is a DAMN good answer to that question that has somehow made me like Badu more than I already did (which is a lot)

Erykah Badu is one of my favorite artists (PERIOD), to this day she still hasn’t released an album that I don’t like, which is saying something because she has been around for a while. Mama’s Gun and Baduzim are my favorite Badu albums.

The quote is from around the 50th minute: https://soundcloud.com/themusicsnobs/episode-014

The Music Snobs Break it Down on the Status of Black Music

Last month, I stumbled across this terrific discussion from the Music Snobs about Soul Music and the disappearing Black aesthetic in music. Azealia Banks has recently made us more aware of this dynamic of “cultural smudging” and D'angelo has reasserted just what the Black aesthetic is in music at the end of 2014.

 This Music Snobs conversation was before the infamous Hot 97 interview of Azealia Banks and before the release of D'angelo’s Black Messiah. Which makes it even more compelling. I found the discussion to be well informed and thought provoking so I hope you will give it a listen. You can subscribe to The Music Snobs on Soundcloud.

When I was a young teenager — that was, like, late ’90s, early 2000s — stuff that I used to think I wasn’t meant to like because I was a grunge kid. Not even grunge and rock or whatever. I was a musician and I was a music guy. And music guys aren’t allowed to be into R&B when they are teenagers because all the teenybopper kids blast that shit in their cars, so that would mean I was categorically opposed to it, you know. And I guess it just took me about 15 years to realize that it had nothing to do with the music, it was just the association with people and types of people. So when I learnt that, it was an extremely liberating time because I felt like I could do anything, I could embrace anything.

Erykah Badu Guest Stars on The Music Snobs. The TMS crew + Badu kick things off with an introspective look into the prolific career of Ghostface Killah and discuss the method behind Tony Starks’ mad genius. Then Arthur, Isaac, Jehan, Scoop, and Erykah examine the long history of image within the music industry and try to draw a line between musicians who have used image to improve their art, and those whose image has overshadowed their music. Finally the crew engages in a wild rapid roundtable that poses an interesting question: What is the one song lyric you’d love to actually say in real life…but know you never will?

Get ready for one of the most highly anticipated episodes of The Music Snobs yet, as Erykah Badu joins us long enough to reveal a side of her we guarantee you’ve never seen.

anonymous asked:

hey so a while ago i was a complete music snob who listened to rock and alternative music and refused to listen to one direction. i was listening to the radio when it mentioned the no control project. i hoped they would play it and when they didn't, i swallowed my pride and looked it up. i am a changed person. i made my (equally snobbish) friends listen to it, and now we're all 1d and larry af. well done to all who took part for changing our naïve minds and opening our eyes to the truth

This makes me so happy! Thank you for telling me. Welcome aboard. :)

Marvin Gaye’s classic “Let’s Get It On” Album Is Appraised By
The Music Snobs In Honor Of Its 40th Anniversary

Marvin Gaye’s classic Let’s Get It On album is appraised
by The Music Snobs in honor of its 40th anniversary.
The crew of Arthur, Isaac, Scoop and Jehan delve
deep into the album’s expression, influences, &
ramifications towards Motown, soul, R&B,
and Marvin’s own career. The episode is
yours for free download via TMS’
site
, where you can check out
many more entertaining &
insightful episodes.