The Sleeping Council

made a piece a while ago about hackney council fining the homeless for being homeless but didn’t like how it turned out so let it fester in a folder somewhere, but decided to re-work it a bit today 

thankfully the council have since responded to the public and now its only a crime to beg for money when you have no money. its a weird world that we live in. 

decided id share the image anyway because im a badass with a general disregard for the rules

His Royal Kingliness

Pinnuzza and I have decided that when he’s really tired and sarcastic, Bellmont starts to refer to himself as “His Royal Kingliness,” and usually doesn’t stop until he gets a decent night’s sleep and/or a cup of coffee.

“Sir? There’s an urgent matter in the Council Room that requires your immediate–”
His Royal Kingliness was up all night with a squalling newborn, and hasn’t had more than three hours of sleep. The Council can wait or meet without me.”

                    ~Thanks Pinnuzza for the fantastic new nickname. Bellmont would send his thanks but he’s glaring at me ;)

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VIDEO: Going to bed? For the sake of your health, put the phone away!

NBC’s Hallie Jackson has new information about how electronic devices may be contributing to our sleep-deprived society. Eight-five percent of American adults tell the Better Sleep Council they have trouble sleeping at night. One in 10 suffers from more serious chronic insomnia, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

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Why does the legal definition of homelessness matter? Advice From Shelter.

Local councils have a legal duty to help certain people if they ask a council for help when they are homeless or threatened with homelessness. The help may be with providing housing or with advice and assistance to help resolve a housing problem. If a council decides that you are legally homeless or threatened with homelessness, it may eventually have to help you by providing you with settled…

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How To Keep Cool In Bed During A Heat Wave

Photo credit: Rex

As temperatures soar to sweltering, there are increased risks to the young, elderly and those with certain medical conditions.

Breathing and heart problems can worsen during a heat wave and those over 75, babies and young children need to take extra care.

Dehydration and overheating cause heat exhaustion and heat stroke. So it can be crucial to your wellbeing to manage your body temperature.

Nighttime can be uncomfortable for everyone, when it’s too hot to sleep. Rolling about unable to nod off is very annoying, even if you are generally healthy. Here are 20 ways to keep cool in bed.

Put a pillowcase in the fridge before bed. Sounds odd. But if the Sleep Council says it works, who are we to argue?

Keeping windows and curtains closed during the day, is a way to stop rooms overheating.

Identify the coolest room and sleep there, if possible. Basements are usually 10-15 degrees cooler than anywhere else in the house.

Use a cooling aloe vera aftersun product before hopping into bed, as this lowers skin temperature.

The Sleep Council recommends opening doors. And if you have a loft, opening the hatch, because it gives the heat somewhere to go.

Consider using a soft gel patch or pack, such as those recommended for relieving migraines. Available in pharmacies, they instantly chill you out!

Wear loose light cotton bedclothes. The Sleep Council says wearing cool clothing in bed is better than being naked, as natural fabric absorbs perspiration.

Splash your face with cool water (but not very cold), or place a damp flannel on the back of your neck.

NHS advice includes keeping cold water or other soft drinks beside the bed, for easy reach, and avoiding caffeine or alcohol.

Have a cool bath or shower before bed. Tepid is better than cold, as a cold shower will cause your body to overheat, working harder to compensate. It’s tempting to have a ‘freezing’ shower but tepid is best, if you want to keep cool in the night.

Don’t have a big meal before bed. Eat little and often and avoid foods that are high in protein, which increase metabolic heat.

Experts suggest running your wrists under cool water for several seconds before getting into bed, to help lower your body temperature.

Ditch the duvet, bin the blankets and go for a thin cotton sheet instead. (Don’t really ditch or bin them. It was just alliteration. You’re bound to need them again soon.)

Fill a traditional hot water bottle with cold water and snuggle it in bed!

Invest in an electric fan and position it on your face and body, on a bedside table. But Age UK warns that “fans can help sweat evaporate but don’t cool the air itself, so don’t rely on them to keep you well in the heat”.

The Sleep Council reckons that “putting a tray of ice and a little water” in front of any fan, cools the air even more.

Keep lights off, as light generates heat. Basic science, see?

Sleep with the windows open, if it is cooler outside than indoors.

To help keep cool as a longer-term strategy, next time you re-vamp your bedroom, buy shades or lighter curtains. Metallic blinds and dark curtains can make you hotter.

So can being physically too close to anyone you share a bed with, so it’s wise to have a big enough bed. Or as the Sleep Council puts it: “There’s nothing worse than two sweaty bodies sticking to each other.” Couldn’t agree more…

Graham Bickler, of Public Health England, said: “There is considerable evidence that heat waves are dangerous and can kill.

"In the 2003 heat wave, there were 2,000 to 3,000 excess deaths in England. Across Europe, there were around 30,000 excess deaths.

"Most of the information is common sense. It’s not rocket science, but it can have a dramatic effect.”

As a general safety rule for the hot nights, the NHS also recommends keeping a phone beside the bed and having medication handy. And look out for any vulnerable friends, neighbours or relatives, until the weather becomes less extreme.

Recently added to the repository: http://newsthrottle.com/video-going-to-bed-for-the-sake-of-your-health-put-the-phone-away/

VIDEO: Going to bed? For the sake of your health, put the phone away!

NBC’s Hallie Jackson has new information about how electronic devices may be contributing to our sleep-deprived society. Eight-five percent of American adults tell the Better Sleep Council they have trouble sleeping at night. One in 10 suffers from more serious chronic insomnia, according…

小床垫也有大生意,Casper 获5500万美金B轮融资

虽然越来越多的公司都在志力于跟踪你的睡眠状态,但有一个团队正在反其道而行之,它重新设计改造了看似最不起眼的床垫,目标很简单,就是想让你实实在在地睡舒服了。

没有实体店、刨去中间商、试用40天、用户体验至上…… Casper是家总部位于纽约的初创公司,它试图改造传统床垫生产和销售的方式,垂直整合整个床垫产业。据WSJ消息,公司日前获得了5500万美金B轮融资,由Institutional Venture Partners领投。

2014年美国睡眠协会(Better Sleep Council)的一份调查显示,大部分消费者不知道应该多久换一次床垫,以及合理的预算应该是多少,他们还常常被各种各样的产品和术语搞得眼花缭乱。

Casper从中看到了商机,由此发明了一种新的床垫,将记忆海绵和乳胶海绵融合在一起,让任何体重和睡眠姿势的人都能获得更好的睡眠体验。乳胶床垫的价格通常在1500美元左右,而Casper 由于直接从官网销售产品,整套销售流程绕开了诸多中间参与者(比如:零售商、手续费、仓储),省去2/3的成本——过去要卖3000到4000美元的产品,如今(所有尺寸)只要1000美元以下。


联合创始人兼CEO Philip Krim表示,此轮融资将主要用于加强供应链和物流的管理,并且计划在欧洲设立总部。他还透露,未来Casper可不止卖床垫了,包括枕头和床单的一系列“睡眠生意”他们都打算承包了。



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