The Reference Council

Vladimir Vladimirovich #Putin: West seeks to split Russian society with economic sanctions

Vladimir Vladimirovich #Putin: West seeks to split Russian society with economic sanctions

Published on Jul 4, 2015

Putin was addressing a meeting of his presidential Security Council. He referred to the European Union’s decision last month to extend its anti-Russia sanctions and the US warnings of possible new measures. He said Russians should not expect their geopolitical opponents to revise their unfriendly course in…

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Putin: West has failed to divide Russian society with sanctions

Russian President Vladimir Putin says the West has sought to split Russian society with economic sanctions but has failed to reach its was addressing a meeting of his presidential Security Council. He referred to the European Union’s decision last month to extend its anti-Russia sanctions and the US warnings of possible new measures. He said Russians should not expect their geopolitical opponents to revise their unfriendly course in the foreseeable future. The US and the EU have imposed several rounds of anti-Russia sanctions since 2014 over alleged involvement in the Ukraine conflict. But Putin said that Western countries that have been imposing sanctions against Russia are in fact responsible for the crisis in eastern @ @ @ @ + @ +VideosPTVInstagram @

from Disclose.tv

Vladimir Vladimirovich #Putin: West has failed to divide Russian society with sanctions

Vladimir Vladimirovich #Putin: West has failed to divide Russian society with sanctions

Published on Jul 3, 2015

Russian President Vladimir Putin says the West has sought to split Russian society with economic sanctions but has failed to reach its goal.

Putin was addressing a meeting of his presidential Security Council. He referred to the European Union’s decision last month to extend its anti-Russia sanctions and the…

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Nine Inch Nails' Logo Gets Appropriated by Alberta Politicians

A few Canadian politicians are having some fun with Nine Inch Nails’ logo, using it as their own with a wink. 

On Tuesday, Alberta premier Rachel Notley, Edmonton mayor Don Iveson and Calgary mayor Naheed Nenshi unveiled a T-shirt promoting a new partnership. On it, Exclaim reports, they appropriate the Nine Inch Nail’s “NIN” logo, using it instead as an acronym for “Notley Iveson Nenshi.”

Def Leppard Honored by Winnipeg Mayor With 8 Song References in City Council Statement

“Building Alberta Together,” it says. 

See them here:

@RachelNotley & @Nenshi showing off their new rock t-shirts: Notley Iveson Nenshi: Building Alberta Together #ableg pic.twitter.com/MYAExO4SPk

— Chima Nkemdirim (@chimaincalgary) June 23, 2015

At least they’re not taking it too seriously. When someone called them out on Twitter, saying the shirts are lame, Nenshi agreed, saying “That’s why it’s funny.”

@Imalbertaboy @chimaincalgary @RachelNotley of course it’s lame. That’s why it’s funny.

— Naheed Nenshi (@nenshi) June 23, 2015

It’s worth pointing out, this isn’t the first time Notley has knocked off a rock band for political purposes. During her campaign this spring, her union supporters sold shirts copping Mötley Crüe’s logo, pronouncing themselves the “Nötley Crüe.”

Conservative group defends Dylann Roof’s “Legitimate Grievances.”: The Council of Conservative Citizens, an organization with white supremacist leanings, has issued a statement defending the “legitimate grievances” expressed by Charleston shooting suspect Dylann Roof. Roof made reference to the council in his manifesto, saying he used its site to learn about “black on White crime.” http://bit.ly/1IZOU3Z

Conservative Group Defends Dylann Roof’s “Legitimate Grievances”: The Council of Conservative Citizens, an organization with white supremacist leanings, has issued a statement defending the “legitimate grievances” expressed by Charleston shooting suspect Dylann Roof. Roof made reference to the council in his manifesto, saying he used its site to learn about “black on White crime.”

In the statement, the council condemns “Roof’s murderous actions,” but goes on to warn that “our society’s silence about [such] crimes—despite enormous amounts of attention to ‘racially tinged’ acts by whites—only increase the anger of people like Dylann Roof. This double standard *only makes acts of murderous frustration more likely* [emphasis theirs]. In his manifesto, Roof outlines other grievances felt by many whites. Again, we utterly condemn Roof’s despicable killings, but they do not detract in the slightest from the legitimacy of some of the positions he has expressed.”

The CCC site also has a statement from the organization’s president, Earl Holt III, saying: “The CofCC is hardly responsible for the actions of this deranged individual merely because he gleaned accurate information from our website.” The Guardian reported Sunday that in recent years Holt has given to a number of GOP politicians, including Ted Cruz, Rick Santorum, Mitt Romney, and Rand Paul. Cruz’s presidential campaign told the Guardian that it plans to return the money.

As my colleagues Clara Jeffery and James West explain in their post decoding the racist references in Roof’s manifesto, the council “was founded by members of Citizens’ Councils of America, also known as White Citizens Councils, a confederation of segregationist groups active until the 1970s. In more recent years, the Council of Conservative Citizens has made news when it was revealed that former US Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott had given speeches to the group. It was also extremely active in demonstrations to keep the Confederate battle flag flying over the state capitol of South Carolina.”

The statement lists a number for the group’s spokesman, Jared Taylor, that is not in service. Calls and emails to its office were not immediately returned; we’ll update this post if they are. http://dlvr.it/BHRT5S

The Deeply Racist References in Dylann Roof’s Apparent Manifesto, Decoded.: The manifesto and photos apparently posted to the web by alleged Charleston gunman Dylann Roof, first unearthed on Twitter by @EMQuangel and @HenryKrinkIe Saturday morning, are full of references to white supremacist groups and terminology. Here are some of the key terms, explained:

1488

The numbers 1488 can be seen scrawled in the sand in photos from the downloadable trove. The 14 is short for “14 words” and denotes an expression used by white supremacists: “We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children.” Because H is the 8th letter of the alphabet, 88 is an abbreviation for the “Heil Hitler” salute.

Council of Conservative Citizens

The manifesto refers to the council as a source of research into “black on White crime.” The Council is a conservative group with white supremacist leanings, considered by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) to be part of the “neo-confederate movement.” It was founded by members of Citizens’ Councils of America, also known as White Citizens Councils, a confederation of segregationist groups active until the 1970s. In more recent years, the CCC has made the news when it was revealed that former US Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott had given speeches to the group. It was also extremely active in the demonstrations to keep the Confederate battle flag flying over the state capitol of South Carolina between 1993 and 2000.

Northwest Front

The manifesto makes reference to the “Northwest Front.” According to its site, “The Northwest Front is a political organization of Aryan men and women who recognize that an independent and sovereign White nation in the Pacific Northwest is the only possibility for the survival of the White race on this continent.” It was founded by Harold Covington, who joined the American Nazi Party while in the US army before moving to South Africa and then Rhodesia, which deported him in 1976, after he sent threatening letters to a Jewish congregation. He bounced around various hate groups both in the North Carolina and the UK, before founding Northwest Front.

References to South Africa and Rhodesia A photo of Dylann Roof from the website “The Last Rhodesian.”

In several of the photos, Roof can be seen wearing a jacket with the flags of apartheid South Africa and Rhodesia, just as in the photo that was widely published after the attack. Former Mother Jones editor Nick Baumann has this excellent summary of what these references mean, over at the Huffington Post:

Rhodesia was an apartheid state in East Africa that was majority black but ruled by white, mostly British-descended people from 1965 until 1979. It grew out of the former British colony of South Rhodesia, which had some degree of self-rule (under the British colonial umbrella) from 1923 until 1965, when the colony’s overwhelmingly white government, fearing having to share power with blacks, declared independence to preserve white supremacy.

“The mantle of the pioneers has fallen on our shoulders to sustain civilization in a primitive country,” Ian Smith, the country’s white leader, declared at the time.

“The Rhodesian flag is important in terms of symbolism, for Rhodesia subscribed to white supremacy,” Blessing-Miles Tendi, a lecturer in African history and politics at Oxford, explained in an email. “A minority, racist, colonial white settler state subjugated a majority black population in the then Rhodesia for approximately a century.”

The manifesto also makes reference to South Africa, “and how such a small minority held the black in apartheid for years and years.” It continues: “if anyone thinks that think will eventually just change for the better, consider how in South Africa they have affirmative action for the black population that makes up 80 percent of the population.” http://dlvr.it/BGtRCc

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Faction Preview - the High Council of Noraedor

The High Council was created by the Kel'Mor Mages during the Blight Wars (3A. 702) to unite Noraedor’s different leaders in the fight against the remnant forces of the Chaos. It meets once every year, traditionally on the first day of Spring, and is always held in the magocratic city of Ren Sáron.

It is a gathering of the major powers in Noraedor’s politics. The seats are always occupied by the four elected monarchs, the two leaders of the Kel'Mor, and they are all allowed to bring a party of five to accompany them to the council meetings. The Game of Houses was invented in the High Council; this refers to the political and social manoeuvring employed by the nobility of various nations to gain status or wealth, or to cause the downfall of others they dislike.

In the present year of the story, 3A. 2008, the High Council have invited leaders from across the world’s factions for a global summit. They are in desperate need of assistance and hope that their guests will be willing to cooperate once they witness the Corruption’s threats.

However, there are many feuds and rivalries within Noraedor’s factions, and even hotter arguments with the other powers of the world. Will the guests be able to look past their own desires and ambitions to make the summit a success? Many fear that the other powers in the world will demand something from the High Council in return for assistance.

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