Takanori Aiba

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For nearly a decade since the late 1970s artist Takanori Aiba worked as a maze illustrator for Japanese fashion magazine POPYE. The following decade he worked as an architect and finally in 2003 decided to merge the two crafts—the design of physical space and the drawing of labyrinths—into these incredibly detailed tiny worlds. Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin, paint and other materials Aiba constructs sprawling miniature communities that wrap around bonsai trees, lighthouses, and amongst the cliffs of nearly vertical islands. I would love to visit every single one of these places, if only I was 6 feet shorter. See more of Aiba’s work here.

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Amazing Miniature Sculptures

Including tiny resorts, islands, lighthouses and hotels, these incredible miniature sculptures have every detail carefully placed and meticulously decorated. The art of miniatures is a tedious one. Working with things so small, tweezers are one of the primary tools in making them. In addition, the scale must be exact, or the entire effect is off.

Artist Takanori Aiba was born in 1953 in Yokohama, Japan. He studied Japanese traditional textiles and dyed clothing in Tokyo at Zokei University. Since 2003, Takanori has put his mind towards three dimensional art works which combine his knowledge and experience as both a maze illustrator and architect. His background becomes apparent when looking at these incredible miniature designs featured above:

  • “Hawaiian Pineapple Resort”
  • “Ice Cream Packages Tower”
  • “Hotel de Michelin” (front)
  • “Hotel de Michelin” (back)
  • “The Lighthouse-B”
  • “The Rock Island”
  • “Bonsai-B”

source

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Takanori Aiba was born in 1953 in Yokohama, Japan. Studied Japanese traditional textiles and dyed clothing in Tokyo Zokei University. Built a first career as a freelance maze illustrator since 1978. His maze works were serialized in “POPYE”, Japanese fashion magazine for 10 years. Founded his own company,”Graphics and Designing Inc.”, in 1981. Expand a range of his career to a concept maker and art director for architectural spaces. Total production of “Shin Yokohama Chinese Noodle Museum”, “Muse Du Petit Prince De Saint Exupery A Hakone”, “NINJA AKASAKA“ were one of his major works.Since, 2003, He put his mind to create three dimensional art works which combines his knowledge and experience of both maze illustrator and architect. On September, 2010, He had a solo exhibition, “Adventures of the Eyes” at Kakiden Gallery, Tokyo Japan with his works.

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Bonsai Sculpture by Japanese artist Takanori Aiba titled Bonsai-B. Made using mixed media such as stone clay, epoxy putty, copper line, plastic, and resin

Cultivating a modern Bonsai style by adding a theme of relationship between human and nature to a Japanese classical Bonsai style. Originally, Japanese Classical Bonsai Style portraits the beauty of nature in miniature. Bonsai-B is an experimental approach to turn out a modern Bonsai style that portraits the beauty of spiritual accordance between human and nature in miniature.


Takanori Aiba. Bonsai-B.

Using materials that include stone clay, epoxy putty, copper line, plastic, and resin, Japanese artist Takanori Aiba has creates this fantastical sculpture called Bonsai-B that looks like someone or something has taken residence in this bonsai tree! It should come as no surprise that Aiba has a background as a maze illustrator and an art director for architectural spaces.

http://www.tokyogoodidea.com/

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Bonsai Tree Houses by Takanori Aiba

For nearly a decade since the late 1970s artist Takanori Aiba worked as a maze illustrator for Japanese fashion magazine POPYE. The following decade he worked as an architect and finally in 2003 decided to merge the two crafts—the design of physical space and the drawing of labyrinths—into these incredibly detailed tiny worlds. Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin, paint and other materials Aiba constructs sprawling miniature communities that wrap around bonsai trees, lighthouses, and amongst the cliffs of nearly vertical islands. I would love to visit every single one of these places, if only I was 6 feet shorter.

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For nearly a decade since the late 1970s artist Takanori Aiba worked as a maze illustrator for Japanese fashion magazine POPYE. The following decade he worked as an architect and finally in 2003 decided to merge the two crafts—the design of physical space and the drawing of labyrinths—into these incredibly detailed [and awesome] tiny worlds. Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin, paint and other materials Aiba constructs sprawling miniature communities that wrap around bonsai trees, lighthouses, and amongst the cliffs of nearly vertical islands. If only we could shrink ourselves and explore these awesome little realms on foot!

See more of Aiba’s work here.

[via Colossal]