More than 20,000 dolphins and porpoises are being slaughtered each year for their meat at the Cove in Taiji, Japan.

We just need 100,000 more signatures to reach our 1,000,000 petition goal. Help us end this tragedy once and for all!

Click here to take action.

A cry for help:

The slaughter of 20,000 dolphins, porpoises, and small whales occurs in Japan each year. Starting on September 1st and continuing through March of the next year, fishermen herd whole families of small cetaceans into shallow bays and mercilessly stab and drown them to death.

With your help, we can pressure Japan to end this cruel and destructive slaughter of dolphins.

We can all make a difference. If you would like your voices to be heard, please contact the respective representatives to tell them the massacre must stop!

Read below to see how you can help:

You can help directly support the Cove Guardians by purchasing items from their Amazon Wish List.

Consider applying to be a Cove Guardian and joining their team in Taiji. This position requires dedication, time, and resources. You must pay for your travel, lodging, food, and all other personal expenses.

Application process: Send e-mail to coveguardian@seashepherd.org and express your interest.

You will be sent an information packet that includes links to the Onshore Volunteer Application and a supplemental questionnaire for Cove Guardians.

You will submit that package either by electronic or physical mail.

You will be notified if you are selected and provided more detailed information to help you in booking your travels to and stay in Japan.

Don’t buy a ticket!
A ticket purchased to a dolphin show buys blood in Taiji

The captive dolphin entertainment industry makes a lot of money from dolphin suffering and death. The way to shut them down is to take the profit out of their operations. By ending the demand for their shows, we can sink them economically.

Do not support these entertainment venues. Terminate your season passes. Encourage your friends and family to stay away from them. Do not include them in your holiday packages or cruises. Contact the parks and let them know how you feel about dolphins kept in captivity. Educate others on the link between the captive dolphin industry and the Taiji dolphin slaughter. Do not participate in captive dolphin programs like “swimming with the dolphins”

The Ceta-Base “Phinventory” is a list of captive dolphins world wide.

Spread the Word

Follow Operation Infinite Patience on social media and share with your friends and family. Ask them to help us end this atrocity.

Contact the Authorities

Help us end the brutal Taiji dolphin slaughter by voicing your concerns to the authorities in Taiji as well as the Japanese Embassy, US Embassy to Japan, US and Japanese Ambassadors to the UN, and the US Senate members of the Committee on Foreign Relations.

PRIME MINISTER OF JAPAN
Prime Minister Shinzo- Abe
Cabinet Office, Government of Japan
1-6-1 Nagata-cho
Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo. 100-8914 JAPAN
+81-3-5253-2111

Website: http://www.kantei.go.jp/foreign/index-e.html
Online comment form #1: https://www.kantei.go.jp/foreign/forms/comment_ssl.html
Online comment form #2: https://form.cao.go.jp/kokusai/en_opinion-0001.html

Japanese Embassies Worldwide:
Websites of Japanese Embassies, Consulates and Permanent Missions

List of Embassies and Consulates-General in Japan:
List of Embassies and Consulates-General in Japan

US Embassy in Japan:
Caroline Kennedy – Ambassador of the United States to Japan
Telephone: 011-81-3-3224-5000
Fax: 011-81-3-3505-1862
Send E-mail to the U.S. Embassy in Japan
Please thank Caroline Kennedy for her defense of the dolphins

Japanese UN Representatives:
H.E. Mr Kazuyoshi Umemoto – Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
japan.mission@dn.mofa.go.jp

H.E. Mr. Jun Yamazaki – Deputy Representative of Japan to the UN
japan.mission@dn.mofa.go.jp

United States UN Representative:
Samantha Power - US Ambassador to the UN
Samantha Power’s Twitter
United States Mission to the United Nations Contact Form

US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations:
US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations

Wakayama Prefecture Office, Fishery Division:
E0717001@pref.wakayama.lg.jp
Telephone: +81-73-441-3010
Fax: +81-73-432-4124

International Whaling Commission (IWC)
The Red House,
135 Station Road,
Impington,
Cambridge,
Cambridgeshire CB24 9NP, UK.
Tel: +44 (0) 1223 233 971
Fax: +44 (0) 1223 232 87
Email: secretariat@iwcoffice.org

United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) / Convention on Migratory Species (CMP)
UNEP/CMS Secretariat
Platz der Vereinten Nationen 1
53113 Bonn, Germany
Tel: (+49 228) 815 2401
Fax: (+49 228) 815 2449
Email: secretariat@cms.int

Hotel Dolphin Resort/Dolphin Base:

Telephone: +81-0735-59-3514
Fax: +81-0735-59-2810

Japan Fisheries Public Content Form:
Contact the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries

WAZA: The World Association of Zoos and Aquariums
secretariat@waza.org

IMATA: The International Marine Mammal Trainers’ Association
info@imata.org

*SIGNAL BOOST*

10

THE FAROE ISLANDS ‘GRIND' 

Every summer, hundreds, sometimes thousands, of pilot whales are deliberately and helplessly stranded before their spinal cords are severed with knives in a centuries old bloody 'ritual.’ However, once the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society heard about this heart wrenching, inhumanely horrific massacre, they headed straight to the Island to challenge their ways. To make matters even more horrendous, pregnant females also fall victim to the knives of the Faeroese with their fetus chopped out of them and dumped into bins carelessly. 

“What the Faeroese do is even more cruel than the slaughter of the dolphins in Taiji, Japan,” said Sea Shepherd Chief Executive Officer Steve Roest from the United Kingdom. “What Sea Shepherd began in Taiji led to the production of the Academy Award film The Cove. We need to put a similar spotlight on the Faeroes.”

 

Diagram of the Supreme Ultimate, from the Compendium of Diagrams (detail), 1623 Zhang Huang (1527-1608).

Taiji means “supreme ultimate,” and as such the diagram symbolizes the fundamental Taoist view of the structure of reality, namely that beyond the duality of phenomenal existence, created through the interaction of yin and yang.

Sign the Petition to Help Save Japan’s Dolphins

More than 20,000 dolphins and porpoises are being slaughtered each year for their meat at the Cove in Taiji, Japan. Yet, the majority of the world is not aware of this happening. Be a part of the solution by signing and sharing this petition.

SIGN NOW

Newest photo of Yuki, the white Risso’s dolphin captured on Thanksgiving Day.

This dolphin doesn’t appear to have any normal colored skin, but does have normal colored eyes, indicating that he is leucistic and not albino.

Also, Yuki is male, meaning the Taiji Whale Museum is likely going to try to breed him with Shiro, the piebald female Risso’s dolphin captured a few days ago. If they produced a calf, there’s a high possibility it would suffer from health issues.

Photo by Taiji Whale Museum.

3

Today is day 3 of the massive dolphin capture and slaughter at the killing cove in Taiji. The heroic Sea Shepherd Cove Guardians are there streaming LIVE video from the scene. More than 250 dolphins have been trapped. The most attractive will be ripped from their families and transported to marine parks. The rest will be slaughtered, their bodies sold for food.

Please DO SOMETHING. Anything. Share this information, contact your local Japanese embassy (leave voicemails, send letters, send emails), and definitely take part in the massive tweetstorm being used to generate attention and energy in hopes of pressuring the Japanese government to STOP this horrific practice. Please tag all posts and especially tweets with #Tweet4Taiji!

Watch live video stream at http://livestream.seashepherd.org.

10
 Taichi Sword 32 Form Movements (1-10)


(預備)Preparation
(三環套月) Three rings encircle the moon 
1. 晴蜓點水 the dragonfly dips water
2. 大魁星 big chief star
3. 燕子抄水 the swallow scoops water with its wings
4. 右攔掃 right sweeping
5. 左攔掃 left sweeping
6. 探海勢 test the sea water
7. 懷中抱月embrace the moon
8. 宿鳥投林 birds fly into the woods
9. 烏龍擺尾 black dragon waves its tail 
10. 青龍出水 the dragon comes out of water

5

The Taiji Whale Museum- A Dolphin’s Worst Nghtmare

1.  Where do Taiji Whale Museum’s Animals Come From?

Innocent cetaceans serving a life sentence in the Whale Museum prison come from (as some of you may have already guessed) the infamous and bloodstained cove of Taiji, Japan.Each year, Taiji hunters corral a whopping 2,000 dolphins and porpoises in a small, hidden cove where the cetaceans await one of two fates. The first destiny applies solely to the “better-looking” individuals (typically bottlenose dolphins) who marine parks and zoos select, purchase, and transport. These dolphins and porpoises live out the remainder of their lives as the subjects ofentertainment for human audiences worldwide.

The second option? All other corralled victims are brutally exterminated and sold as meat at the hands of Japanese fishermen.

2. Most Recent Legal Issues

Just this past May, Dolphin Project leader Ric O’Barry teamed up with Sarah Lucas, the CEO ofAustralia for Dolphins, to sue the Taiji Whale Museum for animal abuse and unconstitutionally, for preventing foreign observers from entering the building. This lawsuit was prompted by the museum’s capture and exploitation of an albino bottlenose dolphin calf. Images of the slaughter surrounding the calf went viral back in January, and the general public became outraged by the brutality surrounding such an angelic looking baby (hence the name, Angel)

2. Most Recent Legal Issues

Just this past May, Dolphin Project leader Ric O’Barry teamed up with Sarah Lucas, the CEO ofAustralia for Dolphins, to sue the Taiji Whale Museum for animal abuse and unconstitutionally, for preventing foreign observers from entering the building. This lawsuit was prompted by the museum’s capture and exploitation of an albino bottlenose dolphin calf. Images of the slaughter surrounding the calf went viral back in January, and the general public became outraged by the brutality surrounding such an angelic looking baby (hence the name, Angel)  

3.  Life in the Wild Versus Life in the Museum

There is very little doubt that zoos, aquariums, and dolphinariums are unable to replicate the activity that occurs daily in the open oceans. Despite this, captive facilities tend to think they can escape this fact by adding “stimulation” to the schedules of dolphins and whales in the form of shows and guest interactions.Dolphin calves will usually stay with their mothers for three to six years, but they sometimes stick around for longer periods of time.

Unfortunately, juvenile dolphins are often the most sought after cetaceans when it comes to the aquarium trade. This is because they are easier to train throughout their lifetime as opposed to older individuals. For this reason, dolphin calves are often prematurely separated from their mothers.

The separation of dolphin calves from their mothers is an incredibly traumatic experience that can often lead to acts of suicide by dolphin parents. This was the case for Angel who was captured in Taiji with 250 other pod mates. Angel was selected for the Taiji Whale Museum because of her rare coloration — a unique characteristic that could easily attract tourists. After being separated from her calf, Angel’s mother was documented sinking to the bottom of the cove where she was never seen again.At the Taiji Whale Museum, several species of dolphins are thrown into the same small tanks where they are expected to coexist peacefully. While different species of animals can sometimes live in harmony, they are often subjected to bullying (and even death) if cage-mates are unable to get along.

In the case of cetaceans, they are forced to submit to the tortures inflicted on them by their tank mates. Angel the albino bottlenose dolphin, for example, is continuously bullied by two striped dolphins. Unable to put up a fight with the older males, she must swim rapidly around her small tank in the hopes of avoiding her oppressors.