Tach

Curiosidad de los signos.

Lo que no sabías de ellos. 

Aries: No es que sea imprudente, sólo que no puede evitar vociferar todo lo que piensa. Al fin al cabo, se arrepiente después de haberte causado dolor. 

Tauro: No taches de frío a Tauro, es muy romántico en el fondo, sólo que no te has ganado esa parte suya. 

Géminis: Lo verás hablar por aquí, por allá, con uno, con otro, pero no sabes lo solo que se siente en el interior. 

Cáncer: Podrá ser la persona más dulce, pero si se lo propone, botará todos esos sentimientos por el retrete y jamás volverá a ser el mismo. 

Leo: Será tachado de egocéntrico, pero no tienes la idea de lo mucho que ha sollozado viendo su reflejo. 

Virgo: Critica fuerte a todo el mundo, pero nunca como a si mismo. 

Libra: Si encontraste a libra bien equilibrado, es como un ángel recién salido del paraíso, pero si no, es el caos hecho persona. 

Escorpio: Su semblante de dureza podría siempre traerle una mala reputación, pero bien adentro es cálido y jocoso. 

Sagitario: No es que no tome las cosas en serio, sólo trata de darle un poco de tiempo a los asuntos, su pensamiento es liberal. 

Capricornio: No es mala gente, ni pérfido, ni perverso, ni vil, ni canalla, ni maléfico, tampoco execrable, sólo que nació con un alma vieja y siente que debe cuidarse de la gente. 

Acuario: No creas lo que dice la gente, mucho tiempo atrás Acuario estuvo lleno de amor, si, en esa alma habitaban los sentimientos más fuertes que jamás vayas a conocer. 

Piscis: No todo es amor con los peces, también pueden ser crueles y vengativos, no te fíes de sus ojos brillantes y su sonrisa inocente. 

-Stephen.

how to pronounce french

what to pronounce as a set :

- en / an / ean / em : like in Jean-Paul, temps (je vois la vie en rose)

- in / un / ain / ein : “1” Alain Delon (c’est un endroit)

- er / ai / ai(en)t / é / et : “é”, not “eee-rrr” (like in champs élysées palapalapa)

- ou : “ou”, not “ooo-uuu” (à minuit ou à midi, il y a tout ce que vous voulez)

- o / au(x) / eau(x) : o (aux champs élysées)

- eu : le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain (here at 1:33)

- gn : “nieu”, ex : montagne (mountain, f) : montanieu

- on : “on”, not “ooo-nnn” (bonjour, Paris!)

- eil / eille : eyy (bouteille at 0:50)


what NOT to pronounce :

1/ the last letters :

- -s, for nouns and verbs : les voitures (the cars) > lé voitur

- -z : nez (nose, m) > né, entrez (come in!) > entré

- -t : le chat (the cat, m) > le cha, tout (everything) > tou

- -d : lourd (heavy, m) > lour / prétend (pretends, 3PS) > préten

- -ps : temps (time/weather, m) : ten / printemps (spring, m) : printen

- -x : bijoux (jewels, m) : bijou / beaux (beautiful, pl m) : bo

- -e : arbre (tree, m) : arbr / chaise (chair, f) : chéz

2/ other letters :

- h- : hêtre (beech, m), humain (human, m), hérisson (hedgehog, m)

- -s-, sometimes : if you see a word with a ô inside, that accent was very likely an s put just after the o (hostel, hospital) ; if you ever see those words in a french text, you are not supposed to pronounce those -s-

- -d-, sometimes, in set expressions : la grand roue (the big wheel) > la gran rou, la grand-mère (the grandmother) > la gran mèr…


the S problem :

“s” can be said either “ss” > Frank Sinatra, or “z” > let’s go to the zoo

- if it’s the first letter, s- is a “ss” > sucre, m (sugar) : ssukr

- “sc” and “ls” together make also “ss” > fils, m (son) : fiss, scie, f (saw) : ssi

- “ss” are “ss”, no shit > poisson, m (fish) : poisson

- a final -s (NB : for a not-verb/not-noun) can be either “ss” or mute : tous as an adjectif indéfini, a comparative, a superlative or a negative = mute (il n’y a plu(s) de pain (there’s no more bread), c’est la plu(s) gentille (she’s the nicest)) ; as a pronom indéfini = “ss” (tous”s” ces hommes)

- when a word finishes with -s and the next starts with a vowel, you make the liaison : vous avez (plural you have) : vou zavé, les éléphants : lé zéléfan


the C problem :

“c” can be said either “ss” > science, f : ssienss, or “k” > carie, f (cavity) : kari

- c+a : “k” > café, m (coffee), cauchemar, m (nightmare) “cochmar”

- c+e : “ss” > cercle, m (circle), céleri, m (celery)

- c+h : ch (no shite) > chaussette, f (sock), chaud, adj (warm) “cho” ; exceptions : orchestre (m), charisme (m), schizophrénie (f), chlore (f, chlorine), choeur (m, chorus), chorale (f, choir), orchidée (f), psychologue (ep), archéologue (ep), chrétien-ne (christian)… : “k”

- c+i : “ss” > citrouille, f (pumpkin), citron, m (lemon)

- c+l : “k” > clé, f (key), classeur, m (binder)

- c+o : “k” > coquin, m (naughty) “cokin”, copain/pine (buddy) “copin”

- c+r : “k” > croquer (to bite), crétin-e (giant moron)

- c+u : “k” > culotte, f (panties), cuir, m (leather)


the G problem :

“g” can be either pronounced ‘softly’ > intelligent-e (smart), as in “jean” (w/o the d), or ‘hardly’ > ex : bague (f, ring), as in “game”

- g+e / g+i / g+y : soft G > gynécologue, gentil-le (nice), imaginaire

- g+a / g+o / g+u / g+consonant : hard G > gaffe (f, blunder), grammaire (f)


the annoying signs situation :

- ¨ : pronounce the two vowels separately : maïs “ma-iss” (m, corn), haïr (to hate) “a-ir”, Noël (m, Christmas) “no-él”

- ç : ss > maçon (bricklayer), français-e (french)

- oe / ae : “e” > oeuf (m, egg) “euf”, coeur (m, heart) “keur”, Laetitia “Létissia”

- ^ : orally I don’t make any difference, it’s often used to make a difference between words with the same spelling (dû/du, tache/tâche), the end


if you want to hear those sets :

BS “medical” tropes to stop using TODAY, 1/?

You’ve seen them. I’ve seen them. The story is going along so well. The character is critically wounded in a dramatic fight; they’re ‘rushed to the hospital’ (more on that later). Drama roils! Will they live? Will they die?

And then… And then the writer (screenwriters, I’m looking at you, too) pulls one of these tired, inaccurate tropes out from under the couch cushions, and you roll your eyes. They’ve Done the Dumb, again. You swear. kick your coffee table. How do they write such crap? Crap like…

Keep reading

2

Two cadavers with ocular discolouration.

Ocular discolouration - also known as ‘tache noir’ or 'black spot’ - occurs when the mucous layer that normally shields the surface of the eye dries out and wrinkles after death. Dust settles over the exposed surface of the iris and scalera, causing it to turn a dark brown or black shade.

People who die with their eyes fully or partially open can appear to be bleeding from their eyes, especially if decomposition is advanced. But the discolouration is in fact only dust and dirt.