TEFL

TEFL v. TESL v. TESOL

So you want to teach English as a language? Awesome. Teaching English, abroad or at home, as a language opens many doors. It can give you the chance to travel and experience different cultures, earn some extra money and/or experience, and looks great on a resume.

As one of the hardest languages to learn (with 44 sounds and only 26 letters + with English being non-phonetic, you bet your knees, it’shard), as a potential teacher, you’re probably wondering what kind of teaching qualification you need in order to get the position you desire: TEFL, TESL, or TESOL?


Thankfully, all three of these certificates give you qualification needed to teach English to students. The easy part is deciding what you plan to do with it: travel or not? 

TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language): This certificate allows you to seek an English teaching job in another country with non-native speakers. So if you want to see China, Japan, France, or Brazil, this is the certificate for you. The TEFL is highly recognizable so no need to worry about that. I suggest you make sure you get at least 120-hours of training as that is the most expected standard for schools and language institutions. (side-note: I will post more information on how to get this certificate later and what employers are looking for later)

TESL (Teaching English as a Second Language): This certificate is designed for teachers who wish to teach to foreign students living in an English-native speaking country (i.e. USA, Canada, or England).  You will not be able to use this abroad. Positions you can seek include working as a language support teacher at public/private schools or as an instructor at a private language school or as a private tutor. (side-note: if this is something that interests you, unfortunately I cannot help as I am only familiar with the TEFL certificate. That said, please check out this site as it will give you the basic information needed: http://study.com/esl_teacher_requirements.html

TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of another Language): This certificate is newer and provides the most ease as to whether you wish to teach overseas or at home. That said, this certificate covers a wider range of topics and does not study them in-depth as compared to the other certificates mentioned above. Here are a few links to TESOL certificate providers: 

http://www.tesol.org/attend-and-learn/certificate-leadership-programs/tesol-core-certificate-program
https://www.oxfordseminars.com/tesol-tesl-tefl-course/


This is just an overview of the 3 certificates. Please do your own research in order to choose the right certificate for you! 


Teaching English in China - Part 2

Hey guys! This is the second info post I’ve written about this process, find the first one here! Quick little overview: This is all based on my experience with the process and the (pretty extensive) research I have done on the subject. I of course think this is all accurate, but if you are thinking of doing this, I should not be your only source of info! That said, I would have loved a series like this when I first started looking into teaching in China, so I think this will be a big help!

About me: 

I am 19 years old, American, a native speaker of English, white, and female. Differences in any of these will impact your job hunting experience. I went through a great recruiter who’s info I will happily give out on request! I left college/uni after 1 year, and I’m not sure if my one year had any impact on getting hired. Many people apply with only a high school degree and are fine. I took a TEFL course but did not earn my certificate, so this didn’t impact my applications, but I do feel more prepared knowing the information I learned.

Writing your CV and cover letter

When you apply for jobs, you will be sending your cover letter and attached Curriculum Vitae to an email address. While some postings bring you to a website with an ‘apply’ link, most just give you an email. 

My form cover letter (obviously with some variations):

Dear Sir or Madam,

Attached is my CV in reference to your job posting on Dave’s ESL Cafe (more about this below) for a position in ________. Right here is where you include a sentence for if you don’t meet all the qualifications - example: I know your posting asked for applicants over the age of 20, and I am only 19, but I feel I make up for my age with maturity. I am hardworking, dedicated, and enthusiastic, and feel I would make a great addition to your team!

Thank you for your consideration,

Sincerely,

_____________

Keep it short, sweet, and professional! I always wrote ‘on Dave’s ESL Cafe’ because that was the only site I used to apply, and sometimes they post the position on more than one job board, with variations in qualifications (Many on Dave’s don’t say they require a degree, and they don’t, but on some of the more ‘refined’ job boards they will say that they do).

You should also attach your CV. This is not a resume! A CV is much more detailed, and should include things like volunteer work, awards from high school, and a recent photo of yourself.

Above is my CV, I took some info out but you get the general idea! It should be at least halfway down the second page, include all the stuff no one cares about once you’re out of high school. A tip I got from a friend in Beijing: if you have done anything remotely associated with the word ‘Christian’, put it in there! Even if you yourself aren’t Christian (I’m not even remotely religious), it’ll help you stand out as a Good Kid™.

Applying for jobs

Dave’s ESL Cafe has a China Job Board that is updated almost daily. The format of the site is horrendous and almost impossible to sort, but it is without a doubt the best site to use for applications - I tried looking at other job boards as well, but they had far fewer postings, and Dave’s actually became the only site I used to find a job.

I recommend sorting the jobs reverse chronologically, and starting by applying to every single one you are even remotely qualified for that was posted within the last week. Then, every day, refresh the page and apply for all the new ones (I applied for 30+ in my first round, and about 10 a day for almost a week after that). 

Send off your applications, and you should hear back very quickly! Once you do hear back, you can narrow down the schools to the ones you are actually interested in. The next post will be about choosing a school and avoiding scams, check in my ‘china series’ tag on my blog to find it!

If you are interested and looking for a job, I have the email address of the recruiter I went through who made the process really simple and easy. Message me for her info!

Advice for Language Learners

External image

In 2000 I obtained a professional certificate in teaching English as a second/foreign language (TEFL). That same year I volunteered at a public school in Missouri, helping immigrant children, mostly from Mexico, learn English. The following year I started working professionally as an EFL teacher in Brazil, and over the years I’ve taught off and on in different schools and privately, both in Brazil and the United States. Throughout 2014 I’ve been teaching English in Uberlândia while consulting for an Australia-based company and looking for a project management role locally. I’m now winding down my classes and preparing to begin a new job as a project manager at a tech company in this city. With this transition, it seems an appropriate time to share some general tips for language learners (English or others).

Above all else, it needs to be understood that language learning is habit acquisition. I had a Brazilian friend several years ago who thought he understood the English language pretty well. He was, in truth, nearly unintelligible. He seemed to obsess over grammatical rules and word meanings, but when he opened his mouth to speak it all came out wrong. On the other hand, I’ve known people who never cracked open a grammar text or attended class, but who have a pretty good handle on English. What’s the difference? I think it boils down to practice, and practice creates habits.

It’s great to learn grammar and memorize vocabulary. It’s essential, really. But if you rarely or never use the language you are trying to learn, you will not acquire it. I’ve had people tell me that they were waiting to learn “enough English” to carry on a basic conversation before they tried to speak. That makes absolutely no sense. In order to learn a language it needs to become habitual, and habits are only formed through regular use.

Think about parents with a small child. The little girl runs to the table at lunch time and her mother says, “Did you wash your hands?” “No,” comes the reply. “Go wash your hands first.” This scene might repeat over and over for quite a while before the child, wanting to avoid the hassle, starts remembering to wash her hands before eating. So it goes with English. Which preposition to use (“on” or “in,” for example) can be a terribly frustrating question to deal with, and someone new to the English language can easily become frustrated. Over time though, with constant use and correction, good habits can be formed and the words can come more easily.

Again, language learning is habit acquisition. That being the case I provide to all my students the following simple list of traits they need to cultivate in themselves in order to learn English:

  1. Courage - My first experience with Portuguese was in Brazil. I came to this country on an internship with no prior knowledge of the language. I had only two weeks of morning classes about the language. The rest of my Portuguese came through speaking, reading and personal study. My team split up the downtown area of Campinas and we walked around every afternoon for nearly two months, by ourselves, striking up conversations in rudimentary Portuguese with shopkeepers. Scary? Yes. Worthwhile? Absolutely. If you are going to learn a language, you are going to have to get out of your comfort zone. There’s no other option…other than giving up.
  2. Sense of Humor - I made a lot of mistakes when I was learning Portuguese, and I still make a few mistakes now and then. It happens. It’s normal. I heard of one American who went to order ice cream at an ice cream parlor in Brazil and asked for “poop flavor.” He meant to ask for coconut, but the word for poop and the word for coconut are very similar, with the difference being in which syllable is stressed. Thankfully, that didn’t happen to me. If it had, though, the best thing to do would be to laugh it off. In Campinas in 1997 I decided to not be afraid of people snickering at my fumbling, messy use of the local language. In a city of over 1 million people, what difference did it make if a handful thought I was odd?
  3. Perseverance - When first learning a language there can be a great deal of excitement. It’s all new, and progress is very easy to measure. As time goes on, however, we get the impression we’re bogging down. We run into prepositions or too many irregular verbs and get grouchy. Many people give up, and this is the worst thing they can do. If you give up it’s game over. If you keep going, no matter how slowly, you will eventually reach your destination.
My favorite example of Courage, Sense of Humor and Perseverance is Joel Santana. This Brazilian soccer coach took responsibility for the South African team some years ago, even though he didn’t speak English. He could have worked solely through an interpreter, but he wanted to speak directly to his players in their language. So he studied hard. The result was less than stellar, as we can see in this video of an interview he gave:

Painful to hear, especially for people who speak both English and Portuguese, but I’m impressed by Santana’s nerve and determination. He used what he had to the best of his ability, courageously. A lot of people, especially in Brazil, made fun of him for the way he spoke. He could have taken that, gotten angry and given up. Instead, he pressed on and has even made money on his unique way of using the language:

So that’s my advice for language learning. Realize it’s a habit you are trying to acquire, then proceed with courage, a good sense of humor and perseverance.

See Also:
Moving to Japan!


The future is bright—and full of cherry blossoms! So happy to tell my followers that I’ll be moving to Japan! It’s a big leap from working at Burger King in nowheresville Ohio, but I’m glad to finally be putting my college degree to use! 

Anyway, I’ll be teaching English to children in a conversational skill setting for (what’s basically an eikaiwa) company called Peppy Kids Club. I’m still in the “let’s not screw up the immigration paperwork” stage, but if all goes well with work visas and such, I should be in Japan by the first week of November! 

I requested a placement in either the Saitama or Kanagawa Prefectures, but who knows. The company could toss me all the way up in Hokkaido, if it so suited them. It’s all a gamble at this point, and one that I am one hundred percent willing to make. :) Eek. Will keep people posted, if they’re interested. <3

TEFL V. TESL V. TESOL

So you want to teach English as a language? Awesome. Teaching English, abroad or at home, as a language opens many doors. It can give you the chance to travel and experience different cultures, earn some extra money and/or experience, and looks great on a resume.
As one of the hardest languages to learn (with 44 sounds and only 26 letters + with English being non-phonetic, you bet your knees, it’shard), as a potential teacher, you’re probably wondering what kind of teaching qualification you need in order to get the position you desire: TEFL, TESL, or TESOL?

Thankfully, all three of these certificates give you qualification needed to teach English to students. The easy part is deciding what you plan to do with it: travel or not?

TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language): This certificate allows you to seek an English teaching job in another country with non-native speakers. So if you want to see China, Japan, France, or Brazil, this is the certificate for you. The TEFL is highly recognizable so no need to worry about that. I suggest you make sure you get at least 120-hours of training as that is the most expected standard for schools and language institutions. (side-note: I will post more information on how to get this certificate later and what employers are looking for later)

TESL (Teaching English as a Second Language): This certificate is designed for teachers who wish to teach to foreign students living in an English-native speaking country (i.e. USA, Canada, or England). You will not be able to use this abroad. Positions you can seek include working as a language support teacher at public/private schools or as an instructor at a private language school or as a private tutor. (side-note: if this is something that interests you, unfortunately I cannot help as I am only familiar with the TEFL certificate. That said, please check out this site as it will give you the basic information needed: http://study.com/esl_teacher_requirements.html)

TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of another Language): This certificate is newer and provides the most ease as to whether you wish to teach overseas or at home. That said, this certificate covers a wider range of topics and does not study them in-depth as compared to the other certificates mentioned above.
Here are a few links to TESOL certificate providers:
http://www.tesol.org/attend-and-learn/certificate-leadership-programs/tesol-core-certificate-program
https://www.oxfordseminars.com/tesol-tesl-tefl-course/

This is just an overview of the 3 certificates. Please do your own research in order to choose the right certificate for you!

Desert Island Shenanigans

Class 3 having group discussions.

Of all of my foreign language classes, my all-time favorite was in Italian 204 where we pretended to be on a deserted island and were negotiating which items to bring. I was pretty fond of the pistol with one shot, la pistola con un solo colpo. Therefore, I’m always most excited to do a similarly themed lesson with my classes here. The class features lots of negotiation and discussion, and this year there were quite some memorable quotes.

Me: “Okay, so our whole class has volunteered to do a social experiment where we live on a deserted island for one year. We only know that the island has fresh water, banana trees–”
Catherine: “Banana trees!? But you hate bananas! If you are on this island, you will surely die!”

Me: “What possible dangers might you face on this island?”
Virgil: “Being hit on the head by coconuts!”

Me: “What kind of problems could we face while swimming?”
Joyce: “SHARKS!”
Me: “I was looking for drowning, but yes, sure, sharks too.”

Me: “In your new groups, negotiate which seven items you will bring to the island. When you’re done, rank them in order of importance.”
[5 minutes later]
Me: “What is the most important item you will bring to the island?”
Group 1: “Bear Grylls!”

Me: “You find out one of your friends is stealing all of the food for themselves. How will you punish them?”
Monica: “EAT THEM!”
[5 minutes later]
Me: “Cannibals from a nearby island attack us! How will you defend yourselves?”
Monica’s Group: “We will give our leader to the cannibal chief, and she will marry him and live happily on his island.”
Me: “That’s not really surprising considering she wanted to eat her friend in the last question.”

Originally posted by lesquatresaisons

So I'm 100% finished university in 17 days....

And I’m going to sign up for a TEFL online course, and hopefully be teaching in Vietnam, Thailand, or South Korea in five months or so.

Who would be interested in following a blog that basically takes you through the whole process? It would basically start at the point of registration for the online course, and ideally continue through the whole experience. I might even do vlogs when I start actually doing stuff.

Who would follow? :)

(also please reblog if you think any of your followers would be interested//help me reach those people)!!!!

First week of teaching - Done

And it ain’t half been a crazy week. 

A lot of blogs (though not all) I read about teaching English abroad tend to focus on the positives. I’ve never really read any that admit how hard teaching is, so I want to try and give an honest account of how difficult this first week has been.

1. A 120 TEFL course does not prepare you for teaching in China: Mainly because the class sizes are huge and a lot of the TEFL taught activities and games are difficult to do due to the number of students and the noise it creates. I’m lucky, my classes are around 48 students. From what I’ve heard, in China it can go up to 80. I would really suggest looking up tips on classroom management in large classes before you start teaching. I think I’ve been lucky, I have co-teachers in each of my class and a points system that the school uses for discipline which has worked well so far. I think as the new foreign teacher, (most of) the kids are behaving well. It will be interesting to see if this changes in a few weeks time. 

2. Problems with technology: I had this naive idea that the school would provide us with some equipment. Maybe a computer in each classroom. Or access to computer rooms. Maybe access to a photocopier, or even a printer. Nope. I bring in my own laptop and use that. The only problem is, my laptop is new and doesn’t connect to their old style screen projectors. Thankfully the lovely I.T. guy at the school (he’s called Five and he’s ace) was able to buy a cable for me. I think what this has taught me is to prepare for technology to fail you.

3. You will cry: After my first full day of lessons, I came home, shut my apartment door and cried. I still feel a bit like doing this now. It’s so hard. I had no idea at what level my student’s English was. I’ve never planned a lesson or stood in front of class before. It’s not something you can just do. And if you want them to actually learn something, rather than just play games with them, it’s difficult to do that when you’re a newbie. 

5. I have classes I’m dreading next week: Two kindergarten classes. In both rooms, I have no access to projectors from which I can plug in my laptop. This means I can’t play songs to the kids. Songs seem to placate the kindergartens. Without them they go crazy. In my other kindergarten class, I can plug in my laptop and play songs and get them to sing and do actions and everything is fine. I don’t know what to do about the other two classes. HELP ME.

6. Good co-teachers make all the difference: Some of them will help out with discipline. Others, such as my kindergarten teacher, stand at the back of the room and leave when things get hectic or out of control. And then turn up ten minutes later wondering why the kindergarten class is now running around the room. And she doesn’t even try and help with discipline. 

7. I’m worried that being an introvert doesn’t help with teaching: Especially the kindergartens. I’m hoping I will be able to act “being silly” and get them to like me in time.

8. There have been highs: My grade 2, 4, and 5 classes are lovely. They are so eager to please and keen to learn. Some of them have higher standards of English then a few of the Chinese English teachers. At the end of one grade 5 class they came up to me and asked me to sign their textbooks. I was so proud. 

TEFL Certification

So you have decided to get that TEFL but not sure how to get one. Well let me introduce you to the three types of certification programs: In-class, online, and abroad. 

<First off I want to say that these are solely based on my opinion and research. I received my TEFL from an online course because of personal reasons. Please take the time to do further research to find the program that best fits you!>

In-Class:
    Pros:
#1-  This type of program has clear benefits, especially if you have never participated in a classroom or taught before. These programs set aside time for you to run your own class (under supervision of course) as well as classroom observation time.  Most employers want you to have some form of experience working with kids or adults in a classroom setting, so if you have little to no exposure I HIGHLY recommend you consider this.

#2- Most TEFL in-class courses have relationships with international schools, nearby language schools, and recruiters, making the job hunt much easier. In-class courses also put you smack dab in the middle of TEFL community, which is filled with people who want to help beginners find the perfect jobs and the jobs you want to avoid. Some courses even provide job placement in foreign countries. 

    Cons:
#1- Cost. These types of programs can cost somewhere between $900-$3000, not including travel or housing for the onsite location. If you live too far from the nearest onsite classroom (such as me) or you don’t have the money this is probably not best for you. You could go through a college such as the UC system in California, but those are legitimate college classes and will take 2+ semesters to receive your certificate. I will say that, if you are lucky you might find a course that will take a payment plan or is having a sale. 

#2- Lack of flexibility is a big issue with in-class programs. More often than not, these programs demand that you must participate in their 6 months- 1 year  teaching abroad program. While this sounds great (hey i got a job and didn’t even need to try), beware of hidden factors such as location (you don’t get to choose where you live and teach for the allotted time), money (make sure you fully understand whatever travel and/or living fees they are requiring you to pay), and time (these classes can be full-time or par-time, but rest assured, like college, they will take up a lot of your time.)

(in-class courses: https://www.englishclub.com/esl-world/USA/TEFL_Courses_in_USA/ , also check universities and language schools in your city)

Abroad:
   
Pros:
#1- Pretty much the same Pros as the in-class program, except you are living and teaching and breathing in another country. You get to experience the culture and language while getting certified. Most of these programs last about 4 weeks, which increases your value in a employer’s eyes as not only have you taught in a class setting, but you lived abroad as well.

    Cons:
#1- Exactly the same as the Cons mentioned in the in-class program. There is little to no flexibility on where you teach and what you teach. The costs for the abroad programs are high, and I want you to make sure that this is program provides some sort of allowance or paycheck or free housing as expenses will be there. Some of these programs are volunteer, so make sure you know what you want before you commit to anything.

(abroad courses: http://www.goabroad.com/teach-abroad)

Online:
    Pros:
#1- Online classes are much cheaper! depending on the online program and TEFL hours, you could pay somewhere between $250-$900, without any travel or material costs. For me personally, I payed about $650 for 120 hours + 2 endorsement classes. If you are tight on money, I highly recommend you check out some online courses. 

#2- Unlike the classroom, online provides incredible flexibility. Instead of cramming yourself into a fixed schedule, online classes allow you to take your time, miss a few days or weeks because of emergencies, work, family vacations. You fit these classes to your personal schedule. You can also have free reign to find any type of TEFL job in any country of your choosing and for whatever benefits you think are important. 

    Cons:
#1- It’ not hands-on. If you are thinking about taking online TEFL courses, then I ask you to compensate and find a part-time tutoring or volunteer teaching job. Employers are looking for some form of experience working with a student, so make sure you get some. 

#2- Online courses often don’t provide you with a job. Now I say “often” because there are probably online courses that do, but please see in-class con #2. Most though do not, and you will have to apply to a few online job recruitment websites and finding a job can take time, especially if you do not like your current job.

( Online course list: http://www.goabroad.com/tefl-courses/listing/onlineTEFL)

Why Study Abroad

A student’s life is one like no other. Throwing yourself into the unknown to meet new people, study hard and create memories for life will be the best experience of your life. And hey, why not make it that little bit better by taking your studies overseas! 

flickr | Jirka Matousek

Most universities offer you this amazing opportunity but only a select few students are brave enough to do it. A feat like this takes guts, bravery and an intrepid soul to do but to combine travel with study will only bring positives to you as a person and as an academic. Universities are often flexible with the period of time you can spend abroad and tend to offer between one semester to one year away at a partner university.  So if you are brave enough to do so, what can you expect?

A Different Culture

flickr | The LEAF Project

It may sound obvious but by travelling to another country to study will be a huge culture shock, no matter how similar you think it is to home. Every country has unique methods to teach their students so you’ll be thrown into a different way of life, both academically and personally. Therefore, you will learn a lot, not just about another way of life but about yourself. Unlike a tourist, you will have to live, learn and interact with the locals which is the best way to fully appreciate what your host nation has to offer. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or try new things because you will be in a privileged position and the envy of all your friends, make the most of it! Don’t forget, you won’t be studying all day every day. You will have free time to explore your new home and fully integrate yourself in another world!

Cheaper?

flickr | Hussain Didi

The price of studying abroad can vary hugely and is usually dependent on your university. Sometimes scholarships are available which can certainly help ease the financial burden but this is a once in a lifetime opportunity so don’t let money put you off! If you have completed your undergraduate degree then maybe you are thinking of taking a masters? If this is the case, then studying abroad would certainly be an option worth thinking about. Postgraduate fees abroad are so much cheaper and it is a great platform to kick-start a career after graduating. Money saved on tuition can go towards more exciting trips in your new home!

Standing Out From The Rest

flickr | Saint Louis University Madrid Campus

Not only will you create memories which last a lifetime, make friends from around the globe and study in a unique environment, but you will also have something exciting to put on your CV.  In such a competitive job market, having anything which sets you apart from the rest is invaluable. Employers will see that you are adaptable, brave and have a wealth of international experience. With more and more people doing degrees, spending time abroad to study will really help you stand out of the crowd. It might just help you land that dream job in the future!
So, although scary, there are so many benefits of studying abroad. Travel alone is so enriching but living like a local for a long period time will feel like such an inspiring achievement. Unlike a regular tourist, you will return with qualifications, international contacts and a new set of skills, the perfect platform for future success. So why not give it a go and see!?

Frontier offer you the chance to gain qualifications abroad with our ’Get Qualified’ trips where volunteers can earn BTEC, TEFL and other fantastic qualifications.  So sign up and get going today!

by Ben Church - Online Journalism Intern

Frontier runs conservation, development, teaching and adventure travel projects in over 50 countries worldwide - so join us and explore the world!

See more from our volunteers #Frontiervolunteer

I’m breaking my promise of not posting pics of myself because this is just too cool. ::::::::A girl in my gym named Serafina found a picture on Sam’s WeChat detailing my physical transformation as I persevere through my Peace Corps China experience. Serafina works for a local Chongqing TV program that focuses on health and wellness. She asked to interview me and I of course said yes because I want to appeal to the 2nd and 3rd goals of PC. Using Chinese and English, I completely describe the long term benefits of health and wellness and how it contributes to my overall success as a volunteer living in China. They will watch me for three days, observing my lifestyle, exercise routine, and my eating habits. Now. I don’t know how many people in Chongqing watch this, but mind you, there are 32 million people living here, so, you do the math (because I studied English and can’t). 🙃🇨🇳🎥#peacecorps #peacecorpschina #peacecorpsvolunteer #propitiouspanda #health #wellness #fitness #exercise #mindandbody #experience #weightloss #chongqing #重庆 #china #中国 #secondgoals #thirdgoals #tv #program #teachingabroad #tefl #eatinghealthy #chinese #life (at 中国,重庆)

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We did a creative writing assignment in class….

“Long long ago, a beautiful girl met a cute dog. The dog is very fashionable. The girl took the dog back to home. She spend lots of time to look after the dog and they became BFF. The beautiful girl always buy dog food on window shopping. One day the dog’s appearance began change. The dog became a boy. Although the boy is handsome, But the girl still misses the dog.”

honestly same

Taking the N1 this winter, completing a TEFL Course due by January, and finishing grad applications. 

It’s going to be a long few months but I like having a few goals to work to to help keep me focused. Sometimes it’s easy to feel stuck on JET but as busy as I’m going to be, it’s fine. I just hope it all works out for the best.  

It’s official.

I am happy to officially say that I’ve accepted a position to teach at an institute in Gwangju, South Korea. I still have a great deal to work through before I am on a plane, but I cannot thank everyone enough for their support, prayers, and encouragement with me on this journey. I am still asking for that as I get all the final preparations together. It’s so surreal to me.