Sula

In a way, her strangeness, her naïveté, her craving for the other half of her equation was the consequence of an idle imagination. Had she paints, or clay, or knew the discipline of the dance or strings; had she anything to engage her tremendous curiosity and gift for metaphor, she might have exchanged the restlessness and preoccupation with whim for an activity that provided her with all she yearned for.

And like any artist with no art form, she became dangerous.
—  Toni Morrison, Sula

It’s the fusion mermaid brigade!
based on @l-sula-l ‘s (and my personal favorite) design!

THE ONE, THE ONLY, THAT STARTED IT ALL: RAINBOW QUARTZ!!!  I remember watching Sula drawing her, and how fun that stream was, and Sula herself is so amazing! Really, Sula you’re so great, and fun, and really, I love you! You make the best pearl impressions! let pearl say fuck 2k16 And I absolutely adore your drawings! 

Original drawing that started the fusion mermaid brigade is  ✨ here! ✨ and with this one, the brigade is full! I I’m so excited I could just shatter! 

They were solitary little girls whose loneliness was so profound it intoxicated them and sent them stumbling into Technicolored visions that always included a presence, a someone, who, quite like the dreamer, shared the delight of the dream.
—  Sula by Toni Morrison
In a way, her strangeness, her naiveté, her craving for the other half of her equation was the consequence of an idle imagination. Had she paints, or clay, or knew the discipline of the dance, or strings, had she anything to engage her tremendous curiosity and her gift for metaphor, she might have exchanged the restlessness and preoccupation with whim for an activity that provided her with all she yearned for. And like an artist with no art form, she became dangerous.
—  Toni Morrison
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Celebrating heroines real and imagined, we asked rising novelists to share their favorite characters from literature and then dress the part. Playing make believe off the page in the season’s latest clothes, many of these rising authors chose to honor writers who have influenced their work, from Toni Morrison to Patricia Highsmith. See more on the Cut

Photos by Maxine Helfman:

Alexandra Kleeman Dressed As Mina Harker From Bram Stoker’s Dracula: When Dracula starts turning Mina, she becomes telepathically connected to him. The fear was that erosion of the sharp boundary around your mind, not knowing where you start and where you end. Her situation isn’t all that different from a writer’s, because you have to let your mind go porous.”

Angela Flournoy Dressed As Sula Peace From Toni Morrison’s Sula: “I remember the first time I read it, I had never really read a book that was pretty plainly just about black female friendship. Toni Morrison said there’s always multiple layers of meaning, but it’s really about Sula and Nel. I imagine [Sula] as someone who carries herself very confidently in a world that doesn’t necessarily encourage that, not for a woman in general but specifically not for a black woman.“

Emily St. John Mandel Dressed As James Bond From The Ian Fleming Series: “Who hasn’t fantasized about being utterly competent, impeccably dressed, supremely unflappable, and in possession of multiple passports?”

Hanya Yanagihara Dressed As Tom Ripley From Patricia Highsmith’s The Talented Mr. Ripley: “Ripley is one of the greatest villains. The villains are always the characters the author has the most fun writing, and they usually get the best lines. I wanted to capture Ripley when he realized he had crossed over from being a frustrated nobody into somebody who had really given up part of his claim to humanness in exchange for a different life.“