Street-Talk

Is it really?

So Rowling had no way of knowing the political climate during the 19 Years Later epilogue, but we do now. So consider this: what kind of world does the Golden Trio live in right now?

Their country is in the middle of Brexit talks, with racism and protectionism at their worst and the magic community isn’t far behind. 

Young Pure Bloods march the streets with torches and capes, shouting “They will not replace us!” They wear Deatheater masks and temporary tattoos (oh it’s not the real thing, they’ll wash it off and be back at the office on Monday).

In the news, the authorities call for a cease of violence and ask people not to fight the young pure bloods. In the streets, people talk about talking to them calmly to fix things. Ron is livid. “You don’t reason with bloody Deatheaters! You throw curses at them!”

Hermione’s work for equality in the magical world gets harder every day. She starts getting death threats in her mail, many howlers that leave her in tears. She keeps going. When people insist that every werewolf is dangerous to society and they should all be banned from country, she tearfully remembers Lupin giving his life to protect them all, she remembers Dobby with a knife in his heart and Hagrid with his half giant blood and his giant heart. She keeps fighting. 

As much as he hates it —and he hates it a lot— Harry becomes a vocal public figure again, constantly condemning blood purists and calling for action against them. His office calls horrified after the first interview, telling him he can’t be calling for violence against this people who are only protesting. “They are Deatheaters and this is how we deal with them,” he snarls back. “Have you forgotten Voldemort?” On the other side of the line, he can feel them flinch. 

No one who fought the war has forgotten it, but so many others seem to, it pains Harry. It’s been barely twenty years since he saw children die in the grounds of Hogwarts, killed by grown angry men who believed themselves superior. It’s been barely twenty years since Tom Riddle’s death body laid on the ground and he thought they could finally have peace. 

The trio sends their kids on the Hogwarts Express and they can’t help but remember their experiences there in a time much like this. They never thought their own children would have to suffer as they did, they pray they won’t have to. 

Harry touches his lighting scar and reminds himself it hasn’t hurt again for years. All is well. A quiet voice inside his head wonders bitterly: “Is it, really?”

I want to believe in ghosts. I love ghost stories. We were shooting Keanu in New Orleans, and the whole cast went on this ghost tour, led by this sexy, swarthy guy. Like, “If these streets could talk, they’d tell some pretty scary stories. But you probably don’t want to hear about that…” I was looking over at Method Man like, “Oh, my God, I brought a member of the Wu-Tang Clan to this fucking ghost tour. He’s going to hate it.” At the end of the tour, Method Man raises his hand. I was like, “Oh, here it comes.” He goes, “Sometimes I wake up and I feel something sitting on my chest. What is it?” And I’m thinking, It’s blunts, it’s blunts, stop smoking blunts. But the tour guide is like, [nodding] “That’s going to be a night hag.
—  interview with jordan peele
It’s quiet uptown, Alex dies, Eliza sings

ANGELICA:
There are moments that the words don’t reach
There’s a grief too powerful to name
You fight your tears back as well as you can
Once more burdened with the unimaginable!

The moments when your’re in so deep
It feels easier to just swim down
Eliza Hamilton moves uptown
Consumed again by the unimaginable!

ELIZA:
I spend hours in his study
I pour over his words once more
And it’s quiet uptown
A quiet we both felt once before

I take my sister to church with the children
A sign of the cross at the door
And I pray…
I don’t know how I’m going to endure…

ENSEMBLE
If you see her in the street, walking by herself,
Talking to herself, have pity!

ELIZA:
Alexander, you liked it uptown!
It’s quiet uptown!

ENSEMBLE:
She is going through the unimaginable!
She stays up at night, sitting where he used to write
Taking in his words and the city!

ELIZA:
Look around! Look around!
How lucky we are to be alive right now!!

ENSEMBLE:
Can you imagine?

ELIZA (Imagining Alexander beside her):
Look at where you are!
Look at where you started!
I really don’t know why I deserve you
But hear me out!
That would be enough!
If I could spare your life!
If I could trade your life for mine!
You’d be standing here right now
Your dreams alive
And that would be enough!

I don’t pretend to know
The struggles you were facing!
When you wrote that cursed pamphlet,
when you set your world ablaze.

But I’m not afraid!
I know who I married!
I’ll keep your legacy alive…
Could that be enough?

ENSEMBLE:
If you see her in his room
Reading to herself, sobbing to herself
Have pity!
She is going through the unimaginable!
See her sitting all alone, facing the unknown
Looking out at her husband’s city

ELIZA:
Why did you write like you were running out of time?

ENSEMBLE:
She is going through the unimaginable!

ANGELICA:
There are moments that the words don’t reach
There’s a sadness too terrible to name
We find resolve as best as we can
To push away the unimaginable!
We are standing at his headstone
I am standing by Eliza’s side
She reads his words:

HAMILTON (voice):
This letter, my very dear Eliza, will not be delivered to you, unless I shall first have terminated my earthly career; to begin, as I humbly hope from redeeming grace and divine mercy, a happy immortality.

ELIZA/HAMILTON:
I need not tell you of the pangs I feel, from the idea of quitting you and exposing you to the anguish which I know you would feel.
Fly to the bosom of your God and be comforted. With my last idea; I shall cherish the sweet hope of meeting you in a better world.

ELIZA:
Adieu best of wives and best of Women.
Ever yours

HAMILTON:
Alexander.

ELIZA: It’s quiet uptown!

ENSEMBLE:
His legacy…Can you imagine?
His legacy… Can you imagine?
If you see her in the street, walking by herself, talking to herself have pity…
She is going through the unimaginable!


MIght wanna grab some tissues, just like Lin, I made myself cry too

Here’s a link to the original song

I ALSO WRITE IMAGINES, SO HMU FOR SOME REQUESTS

LET ME KNOW WHAT YOU THINK IN THE TAGS OR REBLOG 

(low key wants @linmanuel to see this, but is scared he’ll hate it)

Friendly reminder that you should terminate relationships with people that talk shit about you. People that spread poison because there are running around empty. They have no sense of self. No sense of self love. Why would you allow yourself to be friends with someone that talks shit about you from behind your back. Just how much do you love yourself? Because if you understand the value of self love, you would never be friends with those type of people. It’s a matter of knowing your value. It’s a matter of you saying ‘I don’t have to be around these people in these type of environments and situations in order for me to finally see the value in myself. I love me independent of you loving me. I believe in me. I know my self worth.’ Don’t hang out and mess with those type of people. So they talk shit about other people and you don’t think they are talking about you? Are you that special? Here are the worst type of people in the world to me. The people who literally hate your guts and dislike you and you don’t have a clue that they feel this way about you because they’re able to cover up all of their malicious energy and intentions towards you without giving you no trace that they don’t fuck with you. And then when you finally find out you are like ‘oh shit. You have been saying this and doing this and you feeling this way about me? I had no clue!’ But when people show you who they are and you see it to point when you able to talk about it: 'can you believe what she said about me? Can you believe that?’ and you are able to talk about it then you get an invite from the same person you were just sitting over dinner crying about the following week and you show up. You don’t love yourself for you to be hanging out with these type of people. Nobody who loves themself would ever entertain the idea of ever fucking with these people. When people show you who they are you have got to believe it and you have to make the adjustment according to all of these things that are revealed to you. But what about family? They can talk shit about you right? Oh, so they are allowed to tear you down because it’s family? Hmm. Doing cuts me even deeper because we have the same blood in our bloodstream. I would much rather have a random person in the street talk shit about me and tear me down than my own family or people who I think of as family. You have to be careful to what and who you give emotional access. Friends, family, your girlfriend? You can’t get to the next level with all of the devils that you have in your life. You got so many negative, evil, mean, malicious, and dysfunctional people in your life and around your circles. This is the reason why you can’t clear out the clutter and get to the next level. Self love is the cure to self hate. You are not here to spread and receive hate and negative energy. You are here to love, forgive, and grow. Just don’t hang out with people that talk shit about you or others because you don’t want to be at the receiving end of the shit they are doing. You deserve better. Love. Only love.

stabier  asked:

Hey Jennifer Lawrence is awesome.

Hey Jenifer Lawrence is actually a kind of a very problematic person. A lot of her jokes come at the expense of others. I’ll try to make a general list of the shitty things she has done.

Mod Bethany

Representation Matters to White People Too

Look, when I say “representation matters,” I believe that the most important thing is for people who are often ignored in arts and media to see themselves there. 

But I also mean that it’s important for white/hetero people to see people who aren’t white/hetero. 

Here’s the thing. I was raised in a very white/hetero community. Every friend I had was white. I never had a black person in my classroom until late high school. I never had a black teacher until college. There was one out-gay student at my high school. One. And I saw what shit he had to go through by being out. 

And, if I’m honest with myself, most of the adults in my life were racist and homophobic. They were good, loving people…to me. But they were also racist and homophobic. 

And as a kid through my teen years, I’d be lying if I didn’t say that didn’t affect me. I parrotted the adults in my life, which meant that I often parrotted their hate and their prejudice. I’m ashamed of those attitudes now–now that I’ve had education and met people who were different from me and travelled the world and put aside hate. 

But then? It was easy to excuse racism. People who weren’t white and straight didn’t exist in my world–and they didn’t exist in the world I saw on television and in books and on the radio. It was easier to live in the bubble of that world. 

Representation matters to white people, too. It is important for white people to see diversity. Not as a token, not as “politically correct”–the white people who feel that adding a minority character to a storyline is pandering are horrible people who are entirely missing the point. I’m talking about the white kids who don’t see minorities in their lives, but who see a black girl and a white boy being friends on Sesame Street. I’m talking about the straight teen reading More Happy than Not, I’m talking about the white teen empathizing with Malala Yousafzai. The more representation we have, the more we hold a mirror through the world rather than whiting-out people who aren’t like the majority, the better our world is.

Representation matters.

fun paranoia things

- your friends secretly want to kill you

- Them™

- hidden cameras

- those random strangers on the street are definitely talking about you

- fearing showers because someone is DEFINITELY going to break into the house while you’re showering

- feeling like you are always being stared at by malicious entities

- your psychologist secretly wants to kill you

- x person doesn’t reply in over an hour so obviously they’re dead

- you don’t know why but that food is definitely poisoned

- your family secretly wants to kill you

- that random guy can definitely read your mind, you’re not sure why but he can

- mirrors are evil and terrifying

- that guy on the TV? he’s talking about you

- if you reach over the edge of your bed at night something is definitely going to grab you

- if someone turns onto the same street as you they are definitely following you

- your pets are secretly spying on you

- thinking about a bad thing and then panicking because thinking about the bad thing will make it happen

anonymous asked:

I want to live by myself when I move out of my parent's place but I'm really afraid of money problems? I'm afraid that the only place I can afford will be in the ghetto and it'll all be torn apart and I'll only be allowed to eat one granola bar a week. I'm really stressing out about this. I don't know anything about after school life. I don't know anything about paying bills or how to buy an apartment and it's really scaring me. is there anything you know that can help me?

HI darling,

I’ve actually got a super wonderful masterpost for you to check out:

Home

Money

Health

Emergency

Job

Travel

Better You

Apartments/Houses/Moving

Education

Finances

Job Hunting

Life Skills

Miscellaneous

Relationships

Travel & Vehicles


Other Blog Features

Asks I’ll Probably Need to Refer People to Later

Adult Cheat Sheet:

Once you’ve looked over all those cool links, I have some general advice for you on how you can have some sort of support system going for you:

Reasons to move out of home

You may decide to leave home for many different reasons, including:

  • wishing to live independently
  • location difficulties – for example, the need to move closer to university
  • conflict with your parents
  • being asked to leave by your parents.

Issues to consider when moving out of home

It’s common to be a little unsure when you make a decision like leaving home. You may choose to move, but find that you face problems you didn’t anticipate, such as:

  • Unreadiness – you may find you are not quite ready to handle all the responsibilities.
  • Money worries – bills including rent, utilities like gas and electricity and the cost of groceries may catch you by surprise, especially if you are used to your parents providing for everything. Debt may become an issue.
  • Flatmate problems – issues such as paying bills on time, sharing housework equally, friends who never pay board, but stay anyway, and lifestyle incompatibilities (such as a non-drug-user flatting with a drug user) may result in hostilities and arguments.

Your parents may be worried

Think about how your parents may be feeling and talk with them if they are worried about you. Most parents want their children to be happy and independent, but they might be concerned about a lot of different things. For example:

  • They may worry that you are not ready.
  • They may be sad because they will miss you.
  • They may think you shouldn’t leave home until you are married or have bought a house.
  • They may be concerned about the people you have chosen to live with.

Reassure your parents that you will keep in touch and visit regularly. Try to leave on a positive note. Hopefully, they are happy about your plans and support your decision.

Tips for a successful move

Tips include:

  • Don’t make a rash decision – consider the situation carefully. Are you ready to live independently? Do you make enough money to support yourself? Are you moving out for the right reasons?
  • Draw up a realistic budget – don’t forget to include ‘hidden’ expenses such as the property’s security deposit or bond (usually four weeks’ rent), connection fees for utilities, and home and contents insurance.
  • Communicate – avoid misunderstandings, hostilities and arguments by talking openly and respectfully about your concerns with flatmates and parents. Make sure you’re open to their point of view too – getting along is a two-way street.
  • Keep in touch – talk to your parents about regular home visits: for example, having Sunday night dinner together every week.
  • Work out acceptable behaviour – if your parents don’t like your flatmate(s), find out why. It is usually the behaviour rather than the person that causes offence (for example, swearing or smoking). Out of respect for your parents, ask your flatmate(s) to be on their best behaviour when your parents visit and do the same for them.
  • Ask for help – if things are becoming difficult, don’t be too proud to ask your parents for help. They have a lot of life experience.

If your family home does not provide support

Not everyone who leaves home can return home or ask their parents for help in times of trouble. If you have been thrown out of home or left home to escape abuse or conflict, you may be too young or unprepared to cope.

If you are a fostered child, you will have to leave the state-care system when you turn 18, but you may not be ready to make the sudden transition to independence.

If you need support, help is available from a range of community and government organisations. Assistance includes emergency accommodation and food vouchers. If you can’t call your parents or foster parents, call one of the associations below for information, advice and assistance.

Where to get help

  • Your doctor
  • Kids Helpline Tel. 1800 55 1800
  • Lifeline Tel. 13 11 44
  • Home Ground Services Tel. 1800 048 325
  • Relationships Australia Tel. 1300 364 277
  • Centrelink Crisis or Special Help Tel. 13 28 50
  • Tenants Union of Victoria Tel. (03) 9416 2577

Things to remember

  • Try to solve any problems before you leave home. Don’t leave because of a fight or other family difficulty if you can possibly avoid it.
  • Draw up a realistic budget that includes ‘hidden’ expenses, such as bond, connection fees for utilities, and home and contents insurance.
  • Remember that you can get help from a range of community and government organizations. 

(source)

Keep me updated? xx

In the MBMBAM Seeso Q&A tonight, the brothers talked about how the structure of the show ended up being what it is partially because all the things that they “couldn’t do” because of social anxiety. Like, they couldn’t do man-on-the-street stuff, they couldn’t talk to a ton of strangers, they couldn’t play pranks on people, etc. And the structure of the show ends up feeling very genuine and fun because of those limits? They’re not forcing themselves to do (neurotypical) things they’re not as good at, and in the meantime, working around that stuff begets new ways of doing things. So, like, neurodiverse representation is obviously important because it’s important to be able to see that aspect of yourself in the media you love, but it’s also important because it gives us new structures and kinds of media, and that’s just so exciting to me

15 things about Ishval that Brotherhood cut out

After rewatching Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood recently, I was once again extremely disappointed at the amount of content the anime cut out when it covered the Ishval war in episode 30. Volume 15 of the manga (which was entirely dedicated to showing the war in detail across four chapters) still remains my favourite volume of the whole series, so I wanted to talk about 15 things that Brotherhood cut out. Some of them are minor scenes and some are more major plot points.

The images I’ve included in this post have been taken directly from the Viz Media manga, as I really dislike the poor quality scanlations of FMA that are out there. I would highly recommend buying Volume 15 for yourself, even if it’s the only volume of FMA you ever own.

The things I’ll be covering are:

  1. Neighbouring country Aerugo’s role in the war
  2. The Ishvalans as people - their lives and strengths
  3. The Rockbells’ extra scenes
  4. The military’s order to kill the Rockbells
  5. Roy, Hughes, and Hawkeye’s extra scenes
  6. Hughes’ extended scenes as a squad captain
  7. Corruption of high-ranking officers and internal assassination
  8. Armstrong’s extra scene
  9. Torture & human experimentation of Ishvalans
  10. Doctor Marcoh & Doctor Knox’s extra scene
  11. Roy’s role as the Hero of Ishval
  12. Scar’s brother’s scenes
  13. Roy’s squad
  14. Children as the victims of the war
  15. The overall portrayal of the war, and how Volume 15 was written/illustrated

** VERY LONG POST UNDER THE CUT, VERY IMAGE HEAVY **

Let’s begin!

Keep reading

I went to the anti G20 protest tonight in Hamburg. It was peaceful, we chilled, listening to Techno, had a beer. The march wasn’t allowed to start because the police stated that some protesters wete hooded and disguised. Not where I was standing, we were just wearing sunglasses because it was very sunny.

There was a black block somewhere in front of is, but even they stayed calm. Suddenly, the police went in, using pepper spray and truncheons. They wanted to arrest some people who were disguised. People started to flee in panic. It was a narrow street, so they could only escape by climbing over the harbour docks. Police went after them. We couldnt see much and stayed where we were, because we hadnt done anything, not even shouted insults. Suddenly, riot police was everywhere. We were pressed against a brick wall behind us, police in front of us. To our left, water canons started to shoot. We only escaped because next to us was a guy in a wheelchair. Police let him pass through their cordon and we ran after him, hands in the air. We ran until we reached a corner where some neighbours were gathering. Some girls intoned the imperial march every time police marched up and down the street. We talked to a kurdish family there who wanted to show their kids that one has to protest against dictators, and shared a beer with a queer female protester. After some time, we went up to Reeperbahn. Others we’re gathering there as well.

Eventually, after almost two hours, we were allowed to proceed and finally walk. It was totally peaceful, music was playing (I feel love and saturday night fever) and the worst shout I heard against the police was “Go away”. I think we were at least 10000 people.

In short, I was exercising my civil rights tonight, just being on the street, taking part in a peaceful demonstration, and was chased by a police force I pay with my tax money through the streets of my hometown, hands raised in the air, fearing at some point for my health and safety because of police violence.

This can’t be right.

9

JET X SPRAY BEAST

I love visiting foreign places through some one else’s lens and jet’s photos always have an abundance of  vibe and atmosphere. In particular his work in Tokyo always stood out to me, and when I finally started visiting the city, I realised just how well he is able to capture it with his vivid photos.

Jet has been talking street photos for over a decade, and it shows. Enjoy the pictures and follow him here:

Ig: jetjaguar

Tumblr: ysociety.tumblr.com

  • <p> <b>Ocean:</b> *splashes water on Jungkook*<p/><b>Jungkook:</b> Wtf?<p/><b>Ocean:</b> That's right! Talk shit, get hit bitch!<p/><b>Vmin:</b> *Jungshook*<p/><b>Jungkook:</b> *Crying*<p/><b>Ocean:</b> - and dont catch me hearing you talk mad shit about hitting my sharks on the noses again, the streets talk son.<p/><b>Vmin:</b> *comforting a crying jungkook* It's ok kookie.<p/><b>Ocean:</b> Enjoy your vacation boi!<p/></p>

Context: We (the players) are tasked with getting rid of a gang causing problems in one of the city’s suburbs. We have convinced some of the orphan street children to talk to us about what they know. The DM tells us they don’t know much except to avoid a certain place because bad things happen there.

DM: …and one of the kids found a dead body there.

Me: How traumatized is the child?

DM: Four.

Me: Four? On a scale of what?

DM: Yes.

I never found out how the child was doing.

2

The minute he enters your room, Charles notices a definite change in the atmosphere. He can’t tell if it’s good or bad. “(y/n)?”

“In here,” your voice calls from the bathroom. Charles follows your voice to see you standing at the counter, brushing your hair. He smiles at you fondly and leans in the doorway.

That’s when he notices it. Notices what’s different.

You aren’t blocking him from your mind today. After a year of knowing each other, (y/n) finally trusts him enough to let him in.

“I can feel you in my mind, Charles,” you say softly but not accusingly, turning to face the man.

His face reddens slightly. “Sorry. I won’t if-”

“No,” you cut him off. “It’s okay. I want you to look. Well I don’t exactly want you to, but…you can.” You step forward and take his hand in yours. “I trust you.”

The corner of his mouth twitches up in a smile, and he brings his hand up to cup your cheek. “Are you sure?” At your nod, he moves his hand up instead so his fingers are on your temple. You watch as his eyes flutter shut, and you close yours too.

He sees your childhood: You running from bullies in the school yard, and then a teenage you running away from an abusive foster home. He sees you being beat on the streets of Chicago, begging for food on the street sides and giving blankets to other homeless that you found.

You, alone, cold, and scared, trying to learn to harness your telekinesis in the dead of winter.

But then it’s like all of the negativity washes away.

The hues from the scenes shift from dark to light when Charles finds you on the street, comforting you and talking to you in a way that immediately makes you trust him. Flash through your rehabilitation to full health at the academy, scenes of you and Charles working and walking through the grounds together. So many scenes of you and him together.

When he opens his eyes, it’s to see your beautiful (e/c) ones staring back into his. “(y/n)-”

You cut him off by tilting your head up and pressing your lips to his. He freezes in shock, and after a second or two of him not kissing back, you pull away abruptly. “I’m sorry, I’m sorry I shouldn’t have-”

Now it’s his turn to cut you off by taking your hand and pulling you back into him, kissing you passionately. You sink into his warm embrace as he strokes your hair, and you wrap your arms around his shoulders. He pulls away first for air, and you open your eyes to see him smiling at you.

“I’m glad you let me in today.”

In my class we have a worm day. If they promise to be gentle and not tug, they can hold one of those beautiful squiggly caretakers of dirt. The wonder they have for it is so real - and I say, did you know they have 5 hearts and love you with all of them. Then I say, “are you holding a boy worm or a girl worm” and they guess. They are all right, and they are all wrong, because worms are both. And I say that. I say, “they are just like people; sometimes not a boy or a girl but something in between, or sometimes they’re both on different days. And they still love you with all 5 hearts.”

“Cool,” says one kid. “I don’t want to be a boy, I want to be a girl sometimes.” And I say okay.

Children are taught fear. They are taught that the worms are gross. It isn’t until they’re a few years older than my class - up in 3rd or 4th grade - that they start shrieking at my little worm friends. They won’t play the silly games or sing the silly songs or even promise not to tug. A fourth grader hears my lesson about gender and says, “That’s so weird,” and suddenly I hear from the mouths of these beautiful children, “Yeah,” “this is weird,” “No, mine is a girl.”

It is not the 4th grader I blame. It is the person in her life that saw something beautiful and ruined it for her. It is the “put that down, it’s gross,” “you don’t want to get dirty” “there’s us and there’s them.” I want to show her - without the humble little blind noses of worms, we are nothing. We need them. Did you know if they grow a belt they’re over a year old! Spent tunnelling through the secrets of roots. I want to show her: it’s okay if tomorrow you feel like a boy or maybe something neither, something different that is entirely you.

But fear, once discovered, is not an easy stain to get out. We say, “What will we tell the children” and forget - the children already heard. They heard you snickering about the person down the street. They saw you talking to your friend about “those people”. And they internalize it, burrow it into them. We don’t tell the children, we model hatred until the children can’t hear you, can’t hear you declare, “do as I say, not as I do.”

Later the 4th grader goes home. “Ugh,” her mother says with a shudder, seeing my box, “I hate worms.”