Spike-the-Knight

I’ve heard quite a few people  throw the idea of Shining training Spike to be a knight arround, so I drew a few dumb sketches about it.

No, I was NOT listening to Steven Universe’s ‘sworn to the sword’ episode while drawing this.

anonymous asked:

ive heard you say a few times that you didn't like s7 spuffy, what was it that bothered you rlly about it?

Well, number one, fandom was a hell pit at the time, (imagine having The Spike Discourse going on 24/7, on dozens of different forums and mailing lists) and I’m sure that taints my memory of the whole season.   The writers were so determined to play coy with what Buffy was feeling and why she was feeling it that every tiny nuance of SMG’s expressions got dissected and argued into the ground, every week.  I couldn’t enjoy the Spuffy moments we got, even though a lot of them are quite good in retrospect, because there was no real agreement at the time that they were Spuffy moments.

Number two, after a pretty promising start, the season arc fell apart after the first seven or eight episodes.  I don’t think they utilized the First Evil well at all.  If I could wave a magic wand over S7 and fix just one thing, I would absolutely choose to fix the season arc rather than change anything about Spuffy.

Number three, I was kind of disappointed that they gave Spike a soul.  I felt that they’d already done that story with Angel, and I was hoping they’d do something different with Spike.  But oh well, at least Spike chose to get it.

Mostly… Spike being mired in self-loathing and Buffy being his reluctant sponsor is just not a character dynamic that appeals to me.  There are a lot of fans who eat damaged, self-hating characters up with a spoon; I’m just not one of them.  There was a ton of meta written at the time comparing Spike to a chaste knight worshipping Buffy the (metaphorically) virginal queen, and stuff like that, and I just… don’t dig it.  I preferred them when they were both confident enough to challenge each other – it was great that they could be gentle with each other now, but I loved the spark and the fire, too.  And that was gone.  I hated that in putting Buffy through the depression of S6 and then the attempted rape and giving Spike a soul, the writers had utterly destroyed any chance that we would ever see either of them happy, much less happy together.  We’d never see them bantering or teasing each other, or just having a good healthy argument.  

Fandom kept talking about how mature Spike was now, when to me he just seemed suicidally depressed, and talking about how Buffy was obviously in love with him, when to me it seemed equally likely that she was just helping him out of obligation and guilt, because He Has A Soul Now.  And while I massively disagree with the people who argue that Spike getting a soul was a terrible selfish thing to do because it “forced” Buffy to forgive him, I do think that the fact that Buffy is determined to see souled Spike (and Angel) as completely different people is not all that great for her emotional health, because all the anger and betrayal she feels for what their unsouled selves did never gets resolved.  She just stuffs it down inside and never deals with it (until S10, thank you C. Gage.)

Also I kind of hate the false dichotomy of physical love = bad and dirty/spiritual love good and pure – Joss may not have meant that, but S6 and 7 taken together kinda promote it.   And while I think the final scene where Spike’s burning up is full of dramatic irony and stuff, on a personal level, I hate that TV Spuffy ends with Buffy finally baring her heart, and Spike basically telling her she doesn’t know what she’s talking about.  (I don’t buy that either of them was lying to the other.  I think Spike THOUGHT Buffy was lying to him, but he does her an enormous disservice in thinking so, because Buffy doesn’t tell pleasant lies.)  

I’m glad S7 works for so many people, it’s just always going to be a severely mixed bag for me, particularly if you consider it as the end game. The writers were so afraid of coming off anti-feminist (and rightly so) that S7 Spuffy fails for me as a romance, and comes off as a tragedy of two people who may care for one another, but who ultimately fail to connect.   If you take the comic seasons into account, then S7 becomes just one stage, and a necessary one, in a longer-term relationship, and I’m fine with that.  It’s just when people promote it as the be-all and end-all best of all possible Spuffy worlds, I’m like shoot me now.

4

I was doodling today and got into a very Overwatch mood, so I ended up drawing some MLP characters cosplaying Overwatch characters. Vinyl Scratch is actually a gift to a friend though; he wanted to see what she’d look like as Lucio and I came up with what is seen above. The rest I was just playing around with, but I like how they all came out all the same. :3 The only one that isn’t Overwatch related is Spike; I’ve never drawn “Sir Spike” (I think he looks hilarious) so I decided to doodle him as well. All in all, a lot of fun was had. :3 I think I’ll try some more Overwatch/MLP crossovers in the future; I really enjoy drawing it. c:

Anyway, I hope you guys like them! ^.^

I’ve watched a lot of Vampire tv shows in my life from bits of Dark Shadows reruns as a kid to Buffy to True Blood and the Vampire Diaries. It’s a guilty pleasure but I’ve got to say that Being Human(UK) was probably one of the best. None of the others really addressed that vampires are monsters, or at least not in the same way. By the end of that show or at least the end of the first couple seasons it makes clear that the only truly good thing Mitchell (the vampire) can do for the world is end his life. It doesn’t play around and it has one of the best episodes stating that no matter how much good the penitent vampire does he’ll never be able to make up for the evil he’s done. Now the show broke my heart and Mitchell’s end wrecked me but it was so well done. The show made a point to show that it wasn’t just the people he killed that were hurt, it was their friends and families and that by killing one he hurt countless others. It did such a good job of deconstructing the repentant vampire. (I know they kind of took a different direction with the last two seasons but still the whole thing with Lia was so well done!)