Space-Dust

anonymous asked:

I heard that while there is light in deep space, you can't see it because there nothing for the light to reflect off of. Is that true? Is there visible light in deep space but we just can't see it?

I’m not sure what things in deep space this is referring to but if you think of it like how thick clouds block out the sun, it’s basically the same thing: some clouds of space dust are so thick they block out what’s behind them. There’s also some things that don’t emit much light like asteroids and brown dwarfs; these objects need to reflect light to us for them to be seen in light but it can be that they don’t reflect light in our direction - though there’s other methods we can use to find these kinds of objects c:

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The Orion Nebula in Infrared

A colony of hot, young stars is stirring up the cosmic scene in this new picture from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope. The image shows the Orion nebula, a happening place where stars are born. The young stars dip and peak in brightness due to a variety of reasons. Shifting cold and hot spots on the stars’ surfaces cause brightness levels to change, in addition to surrounding disks of lumpy planet-forming material, which can obstruct starlight. Spitzer is keeping tabs on the young stars, providing data on their changing ways.

The hottest stars in the region, called the Trapezium cluster, are bright spots at center right. Radiation and winds from those stars has sculpted and blown away surrounding dust. The densest parts of the cloud appear dark at center left.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Spitzer/Cal Tech

Star Formation within the Eagle Nebula - M16

This star-forming region is famous for its space pillars that appear in this infrared view from NASA’s Spitzer space telescope. The green dust is the cooler dust and the red dust represents hotter dust that was warmed by the explosion of a massive star 8,000 to 9,000 years ago. Astronomers estimate that the explosions blast wave spread outward and destroyed the eagle nebula’s three famous pillars about 6,000 years about. Since the light from the nebula takes about 7,000 years to reach us we will not witness this destruction for about another 1,000 years.

Credit: NASA/Spitzer

The Trifid Nebula - M20

The massive star factory known as the Trifid Nebula was captured in all its glory with the Wide-Field Imager camera attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. The nebula is named after the dark dust bands that trisect its glowing heart, the Trifid Nebula is a rare combination of three nebulae types that reveal the fury of freshly formed stars and point to more star birth in the future.

Credit: ESO/MPG

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Love and Space Dust - OUT NOW!

My new poetry anthology, Love and Space Dust, is out nowThe book was released today and it's available as:

** Amazon.com Paperback - Amazon.com Kindle - Lulu Publishers Paperback - Amazon.co.uk Kindle - Amazon.co.uk Paperback - Signed Direct from Author **

Plus, you can get a free novel if you buy the anthology this week - click here for more information on the offer!

A Wide-field view of the Rho Ophiuchi star-forming region in visible light

This wide-field view shows the star-forming region Rho Ophiuchi in the constellation of Ophiuchus (The Serpent Bearer), as seen in visible light. This view was created from images forming part of the Digitized Sky Survey 2.

Credit: ESO/Digitized Sky Survey 2.

Acknowledgement: Davide De Martin

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Love and Space Dust - OUT NOW!

My new poetry anthology, Love and Space Dust, is out nowThe book was released today and it's available as:

** Amazon.com Paperback - Amazon.com Kindle - Lulu Publishers Paperback - Amazon.co.uk Kindle - Amazon.co.uk Paperback - Signed Direct from Author **

Plus, you can get a free novel if you buy the anthology this week - click here for more information on the offer!