South-Lanarkshire

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Dew by Dylan Nardini

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This is Bothwell Castle (at night) by rmtx
Via Flickr:
Bothwell Castle is a large medieval castle sited on a high, steep bank, above a bend in the River Clyde, in South Lanarkshire, Scotland. It is located between Uddingston and Bothwell, about 10 miles (16 km) south-east of Glasgow. Construction of the castle was begun in the 13th century by the ancestors of Clan Murray, to guard a strategic crossing point of the Clyde. Bothwell played a key role in Scotland’s Wars of Independence, changing hands several times. The huge cylindrical Donjon was built in the 13th century, but before the rest of the castle was completed it was severely damaged in a series of sieges. Rebuilding in the early 15th century enlarged the castle, but it was abandoned by the 18th century. The present ruin is rectangular, with the remains of the Donjon to the west, and the later Great Hall to the east. The courtyard is enclosed by long curtain walls, with round towers at the south-east and south-west corners.

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Bonnie & Clyde by Dylan Nardini
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Journey to Yes #14

Hilary and Carey are farmers in South Lanarkshire. They talk about their journey from a No vote in 2014 to a Yes vote in an upcoming referendum.

They believe one of the crucial boiling points of the next referendum will be to do with farming and land ownership as Westminster wish to take full control of the UK’s agriculture policy.

They describe the emotional impact Brexit has had on them as they dealt with an incompetent local Tory MP, David Mundell as well as the impact that it will have on their farm.

I seriously urge you all to give this a watch as it gives a fair background on EU agricultural policy as well. Something I wasn’t super aware of until watching.

50 fascinating facts you should know about Scotland, apparently.

1. The official animal of Scotland is the Unicorn.

2. The shortest scheduled flight in the world is one-and-a-half miles long from Westray to Papa Westray in the Orkney Islands of Scotland. The journey takes 1 minute 14 seconds to complete.

3. Scotland has approximately 790 islands, 130 of which are inhabited.

4. The Neolithic settlement of Skara Brae (pictured below), on the island of Orkney, is the oldest building in Britain, dating from 3100 BC.

5. The Hamilton Mausoleum in South Lanarkshire has the longest echo of any man-made structure in the world; a whole 15 seconds.
(Edit - longest echo is now at 112 seconds taken in a man-made structure has been set in an underground fuel depot constructed in Scotland before World War Two.)

6. Scotland has more than 600 square miles of freshwater lakes, including the famous Loch Ness.

7. The capital of Scotland, Edinburgh, is only its second largest city, after Glasgow.

8. Edinburgh was the first city in the world which had its own fire brigade.

9. Like Rome, Edinburgh was built on seven hills and the capital has more listed buildings than anywhere in the world.

10. Scotland had its own monarch until 1603. After Elizabeth I died,James VI of Scotland also became James I of England, ruling both countries.

11. St Andrews Links is considered the “home of golf”; the sport has been played there since the 15th century.

12. Queen Victoria is reputed to have smoked cigarettes during her visits to the Highlands of Scotland to keep away midges.

13.Edinburgh was home to Skye terrier Grey Friar’s Bobby, who captured the hearts of the nation by sitting on the grave of his dead owner for 14 years.

14.Scotland is currently the second largest country in the UK, after England.

15. The highest point in Scotland is Ben Nevis, at 4,406ft (1343m)

More facts after the cut.

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okay, so this is a masterlist of locations. it contains the united states, part of the united kingdom, france, canada, and more! i wanted to provide as many options as possible since the world is such a big place and we don’t all live in the same country. this can be used for characters in a roleplay or simply the setting of a story. hope this is helpful! like/reblog if you use.

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Time Machine Video of the Week

The Jesus And Mary Chain - Never Understand (1985)

Since i have just post the latest music from  The Jesus And Mary Chain, i thought it very apt to post you the bands first ever single as, this weeks time machine video of the week.

The Jesus and Mary Chain are a Scottish alternative / indie rock band formed in East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire Scotland, in 1983. The band revolves around the songwriting partnership of brothers Jim and William Reid. They released a string of albums, singles and EPs between their 1983 formation and their 1999 breakup, and gained notoriety in their early days for short sets and violence that became common at their live shows. In 2007, the band reunited. Primal Scream’s Bobby Gillespie was the bands drummer from 1984 to 1986.

Never Understand was the bands debut single, it was released on the Blanco y Negro label in February 1985. The track was also included on the bands debut album Psychocandy, which was released later in 1985, on 18th November 1985. The bands line up at the time was, Jim Reid (on vocals), William Reid (on guitar), Douglas Hart (on bass) and Bobby Gillespie (on drums).

The sun comes up another day begins
And I don’t even worry about the state I’m in
Head so heavy and I’m looking thin
But when the sun goes down I want to start again

You never understandin’
You never understand me
Yeah

Don’t turn around until you look at me
Why don’t you take a second and tell me what you see
Things I see you only disagree
You never understand that’s what I want to be

You never understandin’
You never understand me
Yeah

Let me introduce you to my feet…..which I used on Thursday to get to the top of Tinto, a hill in South Lanarkshire.  I then lay there for a blissful two hours on gloriously spongey moss and grass :-)

This is the sort of thing I’m prone to doing most weeks, to be honest.  BUT….this particular trip was part of my visit to Europe’s biggest windfarm, which is currently under construction atop the hills in the distance.

I’m still compiling a piece about that visit for this blog, including a nifty photo panorama of the entire site.  Watch this space!

Sealed vault in St Bride’s Kirk, Douglas, with the engraved words ‘The good Sir James of Douglas. Died 1330.’
The Good Sir James Douglas was King Robert the Bruce’s right-hand man during the Scottish Wars for Independence. Douglas not only fought with the rank and file at the great victory at Bannockburn, he also destroyed his own castle so the English could no longer occupy it. For this and his other valiant and brutal actions against them, he was called “the Black Douglas.” Walter Scott wrote a novel about James and his castle entitled “Castle Dangerous.
The Good Sir James and some of his descendants are buried in Douglas at St. Bride’s Kirk. Actually it is uncertain if his bones were returned from his last battle in Spain, where he had stopped to fight the Moors with the Spanish on the way to take King Robert the Bruce’s embalmed heart on crusade to the Holy Land. Seeing himself surrounded and cut off from his men, Douglas charged into the battle, throwing the casket containing the heart ahead of him, and saying something akin to “Forward great heart! Wherever thou goest I will always follow!” Although he died in southern Spain that day, Bruce’s heart was returned to Scotland and buried in Melrose Abbey, and James’s embalmed heart was returned to Douglas and buried in the church.