South Korea

Details about D.Va to Consider

So I realize that there are some things about Korean culture that people might not think of readily, so I wanted to offer a few fun thoughts and tidbits:

  • To recap, Hana Song aka D.Va is a teen World Starcraft Champion from the port city of Busan, famous for its beaches and Buddhist temples
  • At 19 years old, she is old enough drive, but the legal age is 18, so she wouldn’t have had a license for long. Oh, and personal anecdote: The Korean system makes it so that you can attain your driver’s license in three days if you really wanted to. So, I have a license, but I haven’t touched a car since I got the license… which I got in three days…
    • Also, within Korea, Busan is known for its aggressive taxi drivers / drivers in general, aha. I did a day trip with some friends the other day and it was gorgeous, the beach was stunning, but the bus ride was… a little nervewracking…
  • Being from Busan, D.Va should actually have the Busan dialect, which sounds very different from Seoul dialect. Even if she can switch comfortably between the two, if she was raised with the Busan one, it’s probably going to be her default. Here’s an example of the dialect, and here’s an example of D.Va’s Korean voice actress, who is from Busan herself, doing the inflection.
  • Korea has mandatory military service for its men for about two years, which you can fulfill between the ages of 18 and 25. So, unless Overwatch plans to change the system in their world, D.Va is working in a military with this in place.
  • Dunno what Overwatch is going to do with futuristic Busan, but in Korea, if you’re super famous, you’re going to end up on a lot of pizza, fried chicken, cosmetics, and or air conditioner commercials. Each of those are links, but if you want an example of how excessive Korea can get about one person, look at this Kim Yuna compilation. That’s not even all of them - just some of the ones from the year 2016. If D.Va is recognized as a national hero and an idol simultaneously, I wouldn’t be surprised by this kind of treatment.
    • Further, Korean idols are held to a high standard of moral character, as they are expected to be hardworking, positive role models for children and other youths.
    • But seriously, I could write an essay on how celebrity culture / marketing in Korea differs. Heck, I have, for school.

More under the cut since this is getting long:

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