Sourwood

🍯 Honey Varieties 🍯

A short list of honey varieties in case you want to experiment with your recipes. Some have herbal remedy hints, and pairing ideas.

Acacia :Very popular with a mild flavor. The color is usually light yellow, but can range to brown or purple. Goes well with toast or tea. Medicinally, it is used to calm anxiety or help sleep.

Avacado :A warm, dark brown honey that is excellent for recipes that call for brown sugar. It doesnt actually taste like avocados, but mollasses or burned sugar.

Blueberry :Medium amber color with a medium aroma, blueberry honey tastes slightly buttery, with toasted almonds. Great for fruit pastries, it’s usually not difficult to find this variety.

Buckwheat :Dark brown, with a strong, distinct flavor of mollasses. A staple in southern BBQ recipes or other meats. Also used for coughs and sore throats.

Chesnut :This honey is usually too strong for recipes. It is very dark, with a slightly pungent smell and sweet, almost musty taste. It’s quite unpopular, so it isn’t easy to find.

Clover :Very common, known as “table honey”, clover honey is a light, sweet honey that can be used universally.

Cranberry :Medium-red colored and fruity, it tastes like figs or dates. Use cranberry honey for fall fruit dishes.

Eucalptus :Suprisingly, eucalptus honey tastes sweet, with notes of rose petals. It smells strong, almost smokey, and is very dark in color. Goes well with meats or potatoes.

Forest :Also known as Honeydew honey, it is produced by aphid excretion from trees in the area, such as pine. It tastes woody and sweet, and pairs with just about anything.

Hawthorn :Hawthorn honey has a natural calming effect, so it’s usually stirred into chamomile tea. The flavor is strong so it doesnt take too much to sweeten.

Lavender :Ranging from bright to dark colors, the smell is intense just like the flowers. However one spoonful can help with seasonal allergies, and it’s a good source of calcium.

Mountain :Bees collect pollen from wild herbs and flowers in non-polluted mountain areas so the flavor and color can vary. Excellent for coughs and flu.

Orange Blossom :Light yellow with a mild floral smell, it is readily avalable in early spring when orange trees bloom. It has a sour citrus flavor, so it is best used in citrus recipes.

Rasberry :Rasberry honey is slightly bitter, but still tastes like brown sugar or toffee. It smells almost woodsy, and pairs well with fruits or especially coffee.

Sage :Sage honey tastes sweet with hints of rose petals. The color can be light yellow to purple, and it smells mildly floral. It also has a light violet aftertaste. It has so much body it is one of my favorites!

Sourwood :Slightly rare, it’s only available in June or July before its all bought up. It tastes a bit like cloves or nutmeg and smells like cinnamon.

Sunflower :As yellow as it’s petals and smells just as exceptional. It can crystallize easily, if that happens just heat up the jar in some hot water. It can help with sinus problems and allergies.

Tulip Poplar :Tulip Polar honey can be used for almost any dish. It is dark orange, and smells like cooked fruits. It tastes buttery like toffee and a bit like caramel.

Tupelo :Comes from the ogeechee tree in Florida and Georgia. It is slightly rare, and doesn’t crystalize easily. Tastes light buttery and sweet, use with vegetable or chicken recipes.

Top Honey Plants for Producing the Best Honey

Novice beekeepers are often confused as to what honey plants and flowers they should plant in order to provide bee forage for their bees. Too often they have the idea that a few extra pots of geraniums or a couple of hollyhocks will make a difference in the honey crop. They fail to realize that plants suitable for bee pasturage must be planted in high numbers before any noticeable results are seen in the amount of honey that is stored in the hive, and that not all flowers are worked by bees. 

So why don’t bees work certain flowers? Well, for a start, it is no use planting red geraniums and hoping to attract bees to your garden because bees cannot see red. On the other hand, bees are attracted to blue, white, yellow, and purple colored flowers.

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Daily Lines

#DailyLines #BookNINE #GoTELLTheBEESThatIAmGONE #comingalongnicelythankyou #nobabynewsyet

I broke off a small chunk of bread, carefully spread a dab of the pale honey onto it, and handed it to Jamie.

“Taste that. Not like that!” I said, seeing him about to engulf the bite. He froze, the bread half-way to his mouth.

“How am I meant to taste it, if I’m not to put it in my mouth?” He asked warily. “Have ye thought of some novel method of ingestion?” He lifted the morsel to his nose and sniffed it cautiously.

“Slowly. You’re meant to savor it,” I added reprovingly. “It’s special.”

“Oh.” He closed his eyes and inhaled deeply. “Well, it’s got a fine, light nose.” He raised his eyebrows, eyes still closed. “And a nice bouquet, to be sure…lily ‘o the valley, burnt sugar, something a wee bit bitter, maybe…” He frowned concentrating, then opened his eyes and looked at me. “Bee shit?”

I made a grab for the bread, but he snatched it away, stuffed it in his mouth, closed his eyes again and assumed an expression of rapture as he chewed.

“See if I ever give _you_ any more sourwood honey!” I said.
He swallowed, and licked his lips thoughtfully.

“Sourwood. Is that no what ye gave Bobby Higgins last week to make him shit?”

“That’s the leaves.” I waved at a tall jar on the middle shelf. “Sarah Ferguson says that sourwood honey is monstrously good and monstrously rare, and that the folk in Salem and Cross Creek will give you a small ham for a jar of it.”

“Will they, so?” He eyed the honey-pot with more respect. “And it’s from your own wee stingards, is it?”

“Yes, but the sourwood trees only bloom for about six weeks, and I’ve only the one hive. That’s why it’s so—“

A thunder of feet coming onto the porch and the bang of the front door drowned me out, and the air was filled with excited boys’ voices shouting, “Grand-da!” “_Grand-pere_!” “ _Maighister_!”

Jamie stuck his head out into the corridor.

“What?” he said, and the running feet stumbled to a ragged halt, among exclamations and pantings, in the midst of which I picked out one word: ‘Redcoats!’

My Sourwolf *Derek Hale x Reader*

fiesty-kitten123 : Hiiiii! Again with a request, can you do a Derek×reader and he’s a big jerk but likes her and doesn’t know how to act and she a sexy badass vampire who just as bad as him and much sourwood please! Thanks!?

A/N: omg tsundere derek i like (google it if you dunno what that means!). even though i totes suck this was mega fun to write and i’m actually proud of this one? XD  hope you enjoy it ! xxx

(Y/N) (L/N). Someone you most definitely did not want to provoke. She just moved to Beacon Hills, something she ends up doing a lot. She was helping Derek, Scott, and Stiles find their newest threat, a vampire. So, since (Y/N) herself was a vampire, they thought that that’d be their best bet of finding their threat.

‘To get one vampire, you gotta use another vampire’ as Stiles worded it.

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bicycling by the sea, driving with the windows rolled down, roadside produce stands, quiet natural-lit museums,  strawberry ice cream straight from the carton, cats lying in in the sun, freckles, moles, and scars, sourwood honey, thunderstorms,  reading old books by open windows, catching fireflies in august, orange slices with cinnamon, skyscrapers painted gold by the setting sun, waking up next to her

Herb (tree) of the Day

Sorrel (Sourwood) Tree 

Oxydendrum Arboreum

While lore on the Sorrel Wood tree is limited, it is a wonderful addition to any magical practice.  As a medicinal the leaves are cardiac, diuretic, refrigerant and tonic. A tea made from the leaves has been used in the treatment of asthma, diarrhoea, indigestion and to check excessive menstrual bleeding. It is diuretic and is a folk remedy for treating fevers, kidney and bladder ailments. The bark has been chewed in the treatment of mouth ulcers. And as I always say, be sure to check with your primary care physician or licensed Holistic Practitioner before using any natural or folk remedies.

Sorrel wood is a great choice for wands or ritual tools.  It promotes healing and health, balance and beauty.  It’s use in any ceremonial magic or ritual for blessings and good health is a good choice, especially those that have chosen a healing path.  Ritual cups, wands can be used in handfastings, crossings and baby blessings as all require healing, good health and the ability to grow and accept.  

Flowers can be worn on the head, or offered on the altar, and used to dress tables and receiving areas.  Branches may be offered as a healing gift and used in charm bags and amulets.  

Sourwood Honey

Sourwood honey is so rare that a good crop sometimes only surfaces once every decade. Yet, its deep, spicy flavor makes it sought after by honey connoisseurs everywhere. The honey’s scarcity can be attributed to the very small amount of sourwood trees currently growing. The medium-height tree is indigenous to the United States and grows from southern Pennsylvania to northern Georgia. It is also known as sorrel and lily-of-the-valley. It typically blooms from June to August, providing a small window of time in which beekeepers can bring their colonies to collect nectar from the flowers.