Sexuality

most people think ‘pan’ stands for pansexual or panromantic when in fact it stands for panic, which incidentally is what i do all day

Sixth grader Molly Neuner broke her school’s dress code on purpose to take a stand against sexism

On a Friday not long ago, sixth grader Molly Neuner went to a community meeting.

At that community meeting at King Middle School in Portland, Maine, half of her grade, both boys and girls, gathered to talk about the dress code. 

That’s when Molly realized something: There were wildly different rules for the girls and the boys, with far more attention paid to what the girls were wearing than the boys.

“It made me feel uncomfortable, because I don’t want boys looking at me in weird ways and it was awkward. It made me feel sad, because I knew friends in that room who were lesbian or gay who were left out, and I saw another girl look down and looked upset because they said that.“

The following Monday, Molly experienced firsthand what it felt like to get called out at school because of her clothing, with a teacher telling her and a friend to stand up in front of the class and measure her shirt strap. 

If she wore that shirt again, she was told, she’d get detention. When she came home and told her mother, Christina Neuner, this, that’s when the wheels started turning.

“I thought, ‘Oh hell no, this is not happening,’” Neuner said in an interview. “The next day, we started looking online at ‘girls and dress codes’ and saw it was a problem at other schools, and we found the #IAmNotADistraction campaign.”

So last Wednesday, Molly wore a tank top that she loved with lace at the top, but also one she knew would be breaking the dress code. 

She paired it with the words #IAmNotADistraction written on her arm. Read more (4/17/17)

Queerbaiting in BBC Sherlock

Note: Before you label me as a ‘butthurt LGBTQ fan’ (as if such a thing even exists), I’m straight. Because apparently that makes my opinion valid now.

What is queerbaiting? 

There’s a pretty wide definition, actually, but the one that’s most relevant here is: it’s when you make very heavy references to queer relationships or even queer characters in your shows, but then you never follow through on these references. It’s done to increase viewership and draw LGBTQ fans in (because of the promise of positive representation). So basically, it’s a marketing technique, but a harmful one.

Why is queerbaiting harmful?

Think of it this way. You’re gay/bi/a lesbian, and people around you aren’t very accepting or are plain homophobic. You see these two men on TV, and you start thinking…wait, it looks like they’re in love. You go online and realize that you’re not the only one reading the show in this way - there are literally thousands of other people interpreting it the same way. So you tell everyone around you, look at these two men. They’re gay and in love, and this is a popular TV show, and it means that my sexuality and my feelings are valid, and there’s nothing wrong with how I feel. Everyone laughs at you and says “Nope, they aren’t in love. You’re delusional.” 

You think, okay, let them laugh. When this becomes cannon, they’ll know. The queer subtext is all there, and the writers wouldn’t dare not follow through on it, right? But sadly, the queer subtext remains just that: subtext. And suddenly all the homophobes around you stand validated.

But there’s no gay subtext in BBC Sherlock. It’s just a wishful ship.

Wrong. I’m not saying that everyone has to ship Johnlock, but no matter what you ship, you can’t deny the gay subtext in this show. People have written thousands of words worth of meta about it - and it all makes perfect sense. (I believe @inevitably-johnlocked has a master list - or she can link you to one). There are videos decoding all the gay subtext -  let’s take the example of TJLC Explained - 48 videos, and they add up to a total time of 37 hours, 49 minutes and 41 seconds - each one decoding a different aspect of the gay subtext in BBC Sherlock. Apart from the TJLC Explained series, there are a lot of other videos doing the same thing. Sure, a small number of such videos and meta are a little far-fetched, but the majority of them are well-referenced, well-written, and properly decode the various literary tropes used by BBC Sherlock. (Like, seriously, kudos to this fandom for being the absolute best meta-writers I have ever seen. You could turn half of these metas in as proper college essays.)

But the writers and BBC have said that there is no gay subtext.

The problem isn’t even so much with Johnlock not becoming cannon - it’s with the way Mofftiss and BBC have responded to being called out for their bullshit. Yes, they did a complete 180 around the time of season 4, saying “that is not the story we want to tell” and “it has never been implied that John and Sherlock are in love”. When so many people, literally thousands, are reading your show the exact same way, it’s because you put the subtext in there. Saying anything else is an insult to our intelligence - and again, it’s blatant queerbaiting and feeding heteronormativity and straight culture.

*yawn* Heteronormativity and straight culture are myths.

In His Last Vow, if Sherlock had come back to life for Molly or Irene Adler, everyone would insist that he’s in love with them. There would be no question about it. He came back to life for John, but him and John are eternal bros, right?

That, my friend, is heteronormativity right there.

Basically, you’re bitter that your ship didn’t become canon. 

LOL. Read above^ you think anyone would put in this much effort just because ‘their ship didn’t become canon’? The Johnlock community is literally comprised of people of all ages, sexualities, nationalities, and genders. So honestly, pegging us as ‘horny teenage fangirls’ - bit ridiculous. We aren’t waving flags and going around yelling “It’s gay because they looked at each other!”, we’re actually ANALYZING and DECODING the show. Before you label us, go read some meta, then tell us we’re still delusional for believing Johnlock could be real.

Besides, I don’t see such an uproar happening about hetero ships. You know why? Because they have representation, whereas LGBTQ representation in media is still severely lacking.

But artists have the right to do what they want with their art. 

Of course they do, but if my art offended an entire sect of society, I think I’d at least apologize, instead of blatantly denying everything and insulting the people who called me out for my bullshit. 

Additions to this post here

10

Small message from op:

Okay so I spent the last hour making 10 lgbt+ userboxes. Now, I’ve seen people blow up like “Notice how op didn’t add [insert sexuality/romantic orientation here] but added [insert one of above sexualities/romantic orientations, most likely asexual]” On posts like thisWell guess what, I didn’t search any of the sexuaities nor did I get a list. I just thought of an even number of userboxes to make and was like “Well, imma do this cause im bored lol”. So if I get any of your bullshit discourse on here, imma be pissed. So enjoy~ Everyone is free to use wherever I don’t really care.


Friends that will think this is cool/userbox blogs that might think its cool:

@next-venoms @s-m-0-l @the-babe-in-toyland @theuserboxfactory @lgbtquserboxes @lgbt-userboxes

🌸 polysexual/polyamorous folks are not “cheaters” 🌸

🌸 polysexual/polyamorous folks deserve to be respected 🌸

🌸 if you’re polysexual/polyamorous I love you & you’re amazing 🌸

my heart when i see a nonbinary person: ❗🏳️‍🌈❗  ❤️ 💛 💚 💙 💜 🖤 ❣️ 💕 💞 💓 💗 💖 💘 💝 💟  ❗🏳️‍🌈❗

I, a gay, spent 8 months alone reading books by straight moroccan people, so now I’m arguing that if you’re lonely enough anything sounds gay

Swarthmore College, French and Francophone Studies and Gender and Sexuality Studies

Futurs (im)possibles au delà du texte: lectures queers de littérature contemporaine marocaine d'expression française. 

[(Im)possible Futures beyond the Text: Queer Readings of Contemporary French Language Moroccan Literature]