Seven sisters

A tarot spread to try out during the winter months when the constellations Orion and Taurus are overhead. Within the Taurus constellation is the famous Pleiades Star Cluster. In Greek mythology the Pleiades are seven sisters, the daughters of Atlas and Pleione. This star cluster has been observed and worshiped by many ancient civilizations, and today they are connected to the new age idea of higher consciousness life and divine evolution.

The Seven Sisters are the seven stars of the Pleiades and they correspond with the seven chakras. The Pleiades are recognized in every culture around the world, and central to the secret knowledge of ancient civilizations.

1.) Maia the Midwife - Root Chakra
2.) Alcyone the Queen - Belly Chakra
3.) Electra the Awakener - Solar Plexus Chakra
4.) Clean the Lover - Heart Chakra
5.) Taygeta the Storyteller - Throat Chakra
6.) Asterope the Visionary - Third Eye Chakra
7.) Merope the Priestess - Crown Chakra

When you hear the music, you just gotta dance

flickr

Edgy Kodak Girl on a Dangerous Cliff – 1910 by Jim Griffin

<br /><i>Via Flickr:</i>


Standing TOO close to the cliff’s edge.

Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York

Advertisement designed by John Hassall (1868 – 1948)

“The Kodak Girl may have liked living close to the edge, with her modern dress, exposing her ankles, and working that new camera.”

– Trish (below)

Not the White Cliffs of Dover, which you can’t see easily from anywhere on shore. This looks more like the Seven Sisters, near Seaford, almost due south of London, and more than 50 miles southwest from Dover. – Mike (below)

Truthfully, I did not apply to Barnard because it’s a women’s college – I applied in spite of it. Luckily, the school had enough positive aspects to outweigh this negative. Surrounded by only women, 24/7? Ew, no thank you. I agreed with the sentiment that, in this day and age, women’s colleges are somewhat irrelevant. If women no longer need to attend female institutions to achieve higher education, then why would they? There are hundreds of perfectly good co-ed colleges in the world! Yet in only one year at Barnard, I’ve learned my lesson: women’s colleges are not only relevant, but necessary in today’s society. I could tell you the facts – that while only 2% of women graduate from women’s colleges, these graduates comprise over 20% of our congress; that women’s college alum include the likes of Emily Dickinson, Hilary Clinton, Cynthia Nixon (Sex and the City, anyone?), Meryl Streep, Barbara Walters, Nancy Pelosi and hundreds of other household names – but instead I’ll explain my own experience at Barnard, and why attending a women’s college is one of the best decisions I’ve ever made.

One of the most overused, age-old arguments against schools like Barnard is one you’ve probably heard before (I certainly have): a community of only women is unrealistic – it’s nothing like the real world. (News flash: neither is regular college!) The logic is, “how can women successfully assimilate into the work force, where men are not just present, but dominant, if they’ve spent their days surrounded by other women?” Believe it or not, 81% of women’s college graduates reported that their college was extremely or very effective in helping prepare them for their first job, versus 65% of women who graduated from public universities. Yes, I’m surrounded by a lot of estrogen, a lot of the time. No, I don’t feel as though the lack of men is leaving me ill-prepared. Rather, I feel confident and ready to speak my mind, thanks to the simultaneously nurturing yet challenging environment. I never feel as though I’m in competition with my classmates, because I have the opportunity to speak in a free space, without feeling as though I’m being judged or criticized. Every class is an ongoing discussion between peers and professors alike. While this may be possible at co-ed universities, studies have shown that women are less likely to speak up when they are outnumbered by men. Women’s colleges teach leadership and confidence through active participation. (And believe it or not, “women’s studies” isn’t the main focus of every class – and when it is, we analyze gender roles from every side, including the male perspective!) After four years of this, you can imagine that graduates emerge empowered and ready to take their seat at the metaphorical table.

—  Sofia Lyons, HuffingtonPost

A commuter was astonished when he saw seven nuns waiting for a train at Seven Sisters Tube station in London.

The entertaining coincidence appeared not to have been noticed by the nuns as they sat and chatted in a group.

Ben Patey, 33, said: “I had just had a long day and I was waiting to jump on the train when I looked across and saw the nuns and the sign. “I had to do a double-take. It was one of those strange but amusing moments.”

Seven Sisters is believed to take its name from a group of seven elm trees that were planted around a willow tree in the 14th century.

Source: telegraph.co.uk