Seung-Mo-Park

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Thru Apr 7:

MAYA
 Seung Mo Park

BLANK SPACE, 511 W25th St., NYC (#204)

MAYA (generally meaning “illusion” in Sanskrit) is the third phase in a trajectory of Park’s conceptual works dealing with reality, illusion, and existence. Barely possessing materiality of sculpture, or the ideas within them, the idea and conceptualization of MAYA is far from tangible substances.

Ethereal Portraits Made from Layers of Wire Mesh by Seung Mo Park

Korean sculpture Seung Mo Park intensifies the purpose of photography by layering wire mesh over an image. By cutting layers of wire mesh to frame the photographs, Park gives his portraits a three-dimensional effect. To give each piece a deeper dimension, Park uses a projector a few finger widths apart from the final image. Watch the video below on how Mark meticulously configures his work. 

[via Colossal’s Top 20]

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Seung Mo Park is the Korean artist who meticulously cuts up layers of wire mesh by hand to create some very beautiful large-scale portraits.

Each of his pieces start off with a photograph laid over layers of wires with a projector. Then Park starts to cut away certain areas of the mesh to slowly reconstruct the image of the original picture.

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Seung Mo Park.

Using a process that could be the new definition of meticulous, Korean sculptor Seung Mo Park creates giant ephemeral portraits by cutting layer after layer of wire mesh. Each work begins with a photograph which is superimposed over layers of wire with a projector, then using a subtractive technique Park slowly snips away areas of mesh. Each piece is several inches thick as each plane that forms the final image is spaced a few finger widths apart, giving the portraits a certain depth and dimensionality that’s hard to convey in a photograph, but this video on YouTube shows it pretty well. Park just exhibited this month at Blank Space Gallery in New York as part of his latest series Maya (meaning “illusion” in Sanskrit). You can see much more at West Collects. (art news, west collects, lavinia tribiani) (by Christopher)

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Korean artist Seung Mo Park (previously featured here) continues to develop and perfect his ability to create awesomely photorealistic sculptures using stainless steel wire mesh. Numerous layers of wire appear to form a holographic shadow world from which hauntingly beautiful faces and figures emerge.

“If you gaze at Park’s work for long enough, it almost seems as though he has dialed into some special channel caught between realities. A slight turn to the right and maybe his subject will become a real boy once and for all. A slight turn to the left and these ghostly figures might be subsumed forever.”

Park’s sculptures appear so lifelike that it feels like it would only be mildly startling to see one of his faces or figures suddenly move, their eyes locking with our own, perhaps about to speak. We love how the wire mesh frays around the edges of some of the pieces, as though that’s where Park’s shadow world gives way to our own.

Visit Beautiful/Decay to view more of Seung Mo Park’s recent work.

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Among the largest fairs during Miami Art Week has always been the extensive Art Miami, which was conjoined with its sister fair CONTEXT Art Miami in Wynwood, and Aqua Art Miami on the other side of the causeway. We first attended Aqua Art Miami, so named for its host, the Aqua Hotel. Since 2005, the fair has filled room after room, and even the hotel’s hallways, with works by emerging galleries and mid-career artists.

Miami Art Week 2015: CONTEXT, Art Miami, and Aqua Art Miami Recap

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Stunnigly Realistic Portraits Woven From Wire

Korean artist Seung Mo Park uses an unusual medium to create his fantastically detailed portraits: wire. The process is one of painstaking addition and subtraction, cutting wires away from his layered mats to reveal a figure or face. To create the works, Park superimposes pieces of square wire mesh or layers of individual wires, later cutting and bending them to release the image he sees hidden inside. It’s a process much like stippling in reverse, and translated to a highly unusual format.

(Continue Reading)

thisiscolossal.com

Seung Mo Park

Using a process that could be the new definition of meticulous, Korean sculptor Seung Mo Park creates giant ephemeral portraits by cutting layer after layer of wire mesh. Each work begins with a photograph which is superimposed over layers of wire with a projector, then using a subtractive technique Park slowly snips away areas of mesh. Each piece is several inches thick as each plane that forms the final image is spaced a few finger widths apart, giving the portraits a certain depth and dimensionality that’s hard to convey in a photograph.

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Using a process that could be the new definition of meticulous, Korean sculptor Seung Mo Park creates giant ephemeral [and thoroughly awesome] portraits by cutting layer after layer of wire mesh. Each work begins with a photograph which is superimposed over layers of wire with a projector, then using a subtractive technique Park slowly snips away areas of mesh. Each piece is several inches thick as each plane that forms the final image is spaced a few finger widths apart, giving the portraits a certain depth and dimensionality that’s hard to convey in a photograph, but this video on YouTube shows it pretty well. Park just exhibited this month at Blank Space Gallery in New York as part of his latest series Maya (meaning “illusion” in Sanskrit). You can see much more at West Collects

[via Colossal]