Sear-Tower

The foods we choose to put on our plates — or toss away – could have more of an ecological impact than many of us realize.

On Earth Day, here are some ways to consider how our diet impacts the planet.

You’ve heard the numbers on food waste. More than 30 percent of available food is tossed each year in America. It’s enough to fill Chicago’s 1,450-foot-tall Willis Tower (formerly known as the Sears Tower) 44 times over.

The U.S. has set an official goal to reduce food waste by 50 percent by the year 2030. Universities have begun to chip away at the food waste issue by promoting ugly fruit and vegetables and shifting away from pre-cooked, buffet style food, instead serving more cook-to-order options that can cut down on waste. Food service companies are working with farmers and chefs to get more blemished but edible produce into cafeterias across the country. Even religious groups are getting into the act, raising attention to the problem of food waste among the faithful and connecting with restaurants, retailers and food banks to help redirect food to hungry mouths that might otherwise end up in landfills.

Chew On This For Earth Day: How Our Diets Impact The Planet

Illustration: MHJ/Getty Images

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Chicago Plate 251 by David Harmantas
Via Flickr:
Near West Side, Chicago. 8 March, 2016.

vimeo

As you cross the landscape of central North America, the City of Chicago seems to rise up out of nowhere - you’re surrounded by flat, recently glaciated plains and all of a sudden at the boundary between a river and a lake these enormous steel structures rise up into the sky. This video clip explores that urban landscape from the sky.

showmeyoureverythingisokface  asked:

Dear Archy, I noticed that today's Google Doodle was about Fazlur Rahman Khan. Do you have any favorite buildings he designed or influenced, and an estimation of his achievements?

Willis Tower

Fazlur Rahman Khan (Bengali: ফজলুর রহমান খান, Fozlur Rôhman Khan) (3 April 1929 – 27 March 1982) was a Bangladeshi-American structural engineer and architect, who initiated important structural systems for skyscrapers. Considered the “father of tubular designs” for high-rises, Khan was also a pioneer in computer-aided design (CAD). He was the structural designer of the Sears Tower, since renamed Willis Tower, the tallest building in the world from 1973 until 1998, and the 100-story John Hancock Center. via

Fazlur Rahman Khan Google’s Doodle

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Ideal (Chicago P.D.)

Title: Ideal

Fandom: Chicago P.D.

Rating: T/PG-13

Author’s Note: I probably watched one too many romantic dramas this weekend, but I was trying to make myself feel better after the announcement about Sophia’s departure. To me, the best case scenario we can hope for after 4x23 (and given Sophia may be coming back for a few episodes in S5) is a follow-up to Erin and Jay’s conversation in 4x21 about ideal living situations so this is what I came up with.


She will never get used to the hustle and bustle of this city - the constant honking of car horns, the way people push past each other on crowded sidewalks without the apology that comes with Midwestern nicety, the thin crust pizza being hawked by the slice at the same cart selling skinny hot dogs that don’t deserve to be called sausage or bratwurst, the turf wars among precincts over which borough they serve, or the tunnel vision the highrises create making it is impossible to see city landmarks.

That last change was - is - probably the hardest to adapt to because it used to be she walk down the back steps of the District or swing by Firehouse 51 or chase down a suspect and be able to see Sears Tower standing up straight. Offering orientation as she floored the 300 or the Sierra or as she hopped over a fence in a foot chase. Now? Now she orients herself by the number of blocks to the FBI’s headquarters, by the coffee shops and hole in the way restaurants that Lieutenant Benson pointed out to her the night she arrived in New York City with Hank’s admonishment not to look back still ringing in her ears.

Advice Hank himself hadn’t followed given that Benson was waiting for her at baggage claim, that the first person she saw upon arrival was someone from her past. It had been Benson who helped her find a place - one that was smaller than her condo in Chicago and without the floor to ceiling windows or the fireplace, but in a neighborhood that didn’t feel quite so sterile or gentrified as the place the FBI set her up with. It had been Benson who took her out to the coffee shop around the corner from her new apartment and offered her a position in her own unit. Offered to open up doors for her at the NYPD that would let her out of a life spent in starched, white blouses and pantsuits.

But she had to pass, had to take Hank’s advice that she not look back because she couldn’t imagine facing the kind of monsters like Yates every single day. Couldn’t handle the mental mindfuck that would come every time a woman was brutalized that way Nadia had been. And she had to keep the deal she made five months ago. Five months, eleven days, and six hours ago.

So much for not looking back.

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Standing Strong in the Windy City

As part of its Skyline Stories video series, the Chicago Architecture Foundation highlights Willis Tower as a seminal skyscraper that helped transform supertall building design. Formerly known as the Sears Tower, the Chicago icon is comprised of nine squared tubes, each rigid within itself without internal supports. The tubes are bundled together and terminate at varying heights, creating a multi-tiered, wind-resistant form. Watch the video

anonymous asked:

OMG you're in my state please know that i am waving to you from about 100 miles to the south!! also if you get the chance, please visit the natural history museum it's So Freakin Cool

aw helloo! 8’) we were on chicago for a few hours today and we saw the bean, the sears towers and the park then walked around for a while
we’re going back another day too but idk if well get into the museum because that would take a long time to visit ;v; sounds cool tho