Savan-Kotecha

lololypopy  asked:

Hey sweetie ! Asking for your opinion on this. I'm not sure I understand why people say Louis is the leader of 1D and that he made what 1D is/was today. Is it because he wrote most of the songs on the last album ? (Liam did too). Like I saw some posts saying that it's partially thanks to Louis that Harry, Niall and Liam are "free" today. In interview I definitely saw that he was kind if a leader for the boys. But how come it is too for business.

Hi there!

We know from several sources that the boys were supposed to have individual, preconceived images that distinguished them as archetypes of a boyband (similar to how the Spice Girls each had a “handle”).

The Sony hack basically confirmed these shallow, idealized, patronizing images that included a description of Harry as “adorably slow.”

https://waitingforthatday.tumblr.com/post/160988626422/remember-how-sony-designed-and-implemented-these

The consensus is that Louis, being the oldest, and the member w/ the most experience in the entertainment industry, had influence over the boys in their dealings with management. After 2011, it was increasingly clear that Simon Cowell had a vision of One Direction as a typical boy band that would 1. never evolve musically, and 2. never develop an audience outside of their base.

This is not a crazy fan theory. It was confirmed by Ross Golan’s interview of Savan Kotecha, who co-wrote WMYB.

https://seasurfacefullofclouds.tumblr.com/post/159522363780/and-the-writer-iswith-ross-golan-by-big-deal

http://bulletproofhalo.tumblr.com/post/157865630236/savanmy-dude

The interview, which came out earlier this year, confirmed a lot of fan theories about the restrictions the boys had in their musical creativity, and their conflicts with the songwriters hired to write their music.

I discuss it further here, if you’re interested.

https://seasurfacefullofclouds.tumblr.com/post/157937777410/hi-anon-here-thnkyou-for-your-kind-response

https://seasurfacefullofclouds.tumblr.com/post/159574630970/reflections-on-one-direction-harry-styles-and

https://seasurfacefullofclouds.tumblr.com/post/157917630515/so-this-is-a-long-rants-maybe-dont-publish

So the upshot is that Savan Kotecha lost his job because he could no longer argue against Louis Tomlinson. Many of the writers subsequently had to deal with a more empowered One Direction because of this struggle.

Personally, I believe that what we learned about the boys’ creative struggle is a “canary in the coal mine” about their interactions with management.

Louis is outspoken, not easily intimated, and not afraid of conflict. The other boys, in contrast, do not engage well with conflict. You see how, in interviews, they shy away from questions that are at all challenging, and their body language reflects their unease. Sometimes it can be detected in written interviews too.

Harry has dealt with this by seeking new management and breaking old ties as soon as he was able to. Liam and Niall went to different labels. Zayn also went to a different imprint (RCA) under Sony.

The impact of the loss of Simon’s Syco empire cannot be overstated. It wasn’t just that he lost control to Sony (and in effect owns only 10% of Syco) but that the value of the company dropped from multiple hundreds of millions of pounds to about £60 million when it lost One Direction, and failed to develop another comparable act.

Louis’ signing with Syco is not any different than signing with Sony. Syco is majority-owned by Sony.

What Louis has been going through professionally since July 2015 (which was when Syco’s shares were sold to Sony) is a coordinated effort to destroy his career by 1DHQ. It’s revenge.

What 1D-related media (The DM, The Sun) print about the boys is also very telling. These stories paint Louis as a negligent father, a bad friend, a low-classed, talentless hack, etc. Their agenda is to destroy Louis Tomlinson’s career.

Louis is, as you point out, the 1D member with the most songwriting credits.

http://alw4ys-you.tumblr.com/post/160992954390/louis-tomlinson-songwriting-credits

The influence of 1DHQ is fading, in my opinion. Louis is making new music. There’s evidence that he has written with the best songwriters at Warner Chappell and elsewhere. Outside of any reputation of “being difficult to work with” (he has strong opinions about songwriting, I have no doubt), Louis is a $multi-million brand. Industry bigwigs are not going to ignore him; they’re not going to turn down a chance to work with him, if he is free and available. He has a ready-made fanbase, and his songs are going to sell, no matter what, just like his band mates’.

One other thing: John Ryan still works for U.K. X-Factor. It’s a source of good income for him. Interpret that how you will.

Here’s to hoping for happier days.

Hope that helps.

Sea

anonymous asked:

Did you saw the savan thing? I'm glad for louis for standing out like imagine if 1d didn't changed their sound? Probably they wouldn't be here anymore I'm quite sad that they never let them take 100% of control of their music like it would be so great I hope they can show their talents in the future

What stands out to me is that Savan himself admits that he was stuck in a headspace where he viewed the boys as incompetent children.  It’s his own fault that he didn’t give them room and support to grow and they (or only 1 if you listen to Savan) rebelled against that.

All the boys have always had their own opinions and even if they aren’t always free to do what they need to, they’re not going to sit and take it quietly.  That quality of theirs is important because that’s what you have to do to succeed. You can’t succeed just by doing everything that someone else tells you.  You have to have your own voice and your own unique something to add to the world.

Savan KNOWS that he was at fault and yet he’s still bitter that not all the boys were happy with being ignored and suffocated.

I don’t think he’s completely wrong.  It makes sense that they’d need some time to learn and get adapted to the music scene.  They would need guidance at first and not every idea they thought was wonderful would actually be a good one.  If the company was looking for the “5 and bled dry” plan that they habitually use, Savan’s right in that the safe route was the super general romantic pop that was on the first 2 albums.  In that sense, it would be inevitable that the boys would have to sing music they didn’t love.

“Safe” isn’t the only way to succeed, though, and Savan should know as well as anyone that the “5 and bled dry” plan wasn’t in the interest of the boys themselves.  It’s something that is only meant to make profit for the company. He has no business criticizing them for not liking what they were forced to do to earn money for 1DHQ.  Their goal wasn’t ever to be a 5 and done flash in the pan.

It says more to me about Savan’s maturity level that he’s talking about someone that way.  Pretending to be vague while giving enough details that anyone can tell who you’re talking about is petty and disingenuous.  Saying that you made mistakes and still bringing up bitter feelings and painting the other person in a bad light is even more so.

We all can tell it’s Louis he’s talking about.  Not because it describes Louis, but because it clearly describes what 1DHQ has always thought Louis was.  Louis has an amazing knack for writing lyrics and he’s got such an emotive voice. What would have happened if he sat back and continued to allow them to pretend he didn’t exist except as a comedian for the band?  He’d have gotten nowhere.  Anyone can tell that if others are ignoring you, if you don’t speak up, you’re going to continue to get ignored. 

Did Savan just want Louis to take being treated like he didn’t matter lying down?  Did Savan want them all to sing music they didn’t like and be treated as a commodity and be grateful for it?  That’s not what they signed up for. Unfortunately they didn’t know that’s what they were going to get when they did sign up.

I’m disappointed because I really loved Niall and Savan’s interactions over Twitter in the early days.  I wanted him to be more of a Caroline Watson or Paul Higgins.

TLDR;

Savan: “Can you believe that they were angry we didn’t listen to them, pigeon-holed them as worthless, treated them like unimportant children, and were trying to make money rather than advancing their artistic careers?  How childish.”

anonymous asked:

who the hell is Savan Kotecha?

Ah, Nonnie! To not know who Savan Kotecha is marks your life as empty and dull.  Savan is one of the writers of the greatest song ever written. Yes, “What Makes You Beautiful.”  He and Harry stayed friends after that. The pic below is from last year.

But not only that, if you look back in time to 2011-2012, you will find some truly hilarious exchanges between our lovely Harry and the charming Mr. Kotecha.

WTF is wrong with this guy????? So dissappointed….

Interview:

Savan: But, yeah, we didn’t break an act. And even though One Direction is not, like, a credible act, the way, the-the meetings I had with the industry, because, whether or not all the boys recognize [laughing] the development I did for that band from day one, everyone that was around it that was in charge of it, they all saw it, and that spread within the industry. And the tremendous success obviously.

Ross: Is that why you pulled away from them, or is it just sort of like, they grew up-

Savan: They grew up.

Ross: And do their own thing, because they want to go and try to be more credible and-

Savan: Yeah, I think, like, it was a lot in the very beginning. And I’ll take a lot of blame for some of the stuff in the very beginning. They were a manufactured boyband. That’s what it was. They weren’t all hustling musicians trying to make it. They were on a TV show and, and we purposefully, and I was open about that. Like ‘you’re gonna hate hate the music that you do in the beginning.’ Like, I was open about that. You’re 17, 18 year old boys, you’re not supposed to like what a boyband does. Historically, that’s just not how it’s gonna go. And that’s what happened, but it blew up. And yeah, I think by album 3 [Midnight Memories], yeah, not all of them, there was definitely one or two-one especially-that was like, kind of bitter about the fact, that, you know-

Ross: They were a boyband?

Savan: -and he was not the talented one. He wasn’t the singer, and he wasn’t the star. And you know which one I’m talking about…

Ross: Of course.

Savan: And he then started having something against me and against that process, I think. And, you know, maybe we could have been more inviting in the creative process during album 2 [Take Me Home] and not been so…authoritative, but. What happened is that, also, I knew the from day 1. They would cry on my shoulder, because I was with them through the show, and development. No one knew what that thing could be, and who could sing lead, or what that was. And that was me helping shape that thing. And especially the first record. You know, the label wanted, there was this, like, Stargate [another production team] reject Rhianna dance-y song, that they really wanted to do. And I was like ‘No, that can’t be the direction.” ‘Cause, like, they were like my little brothers. I had a lot invested, in like, my time, and emotionally in these kids and their parents and everything.

Ross: Because of the show.

Savan: Because of the show. And the U.K. show is really intense. You become family. It’s three months, and, I love those kids.I will always pick up the phone if any of them call. Even like, that one. And I remember with, like, Julien, I had to convince some of them that, like, ‘you should go in with Julien, he’s really good.’ And agree to go in with him, and like, I think like, and, and when they did, I mean, I’m really happy for Julien in all that.

Ross: Oh yeah!

Savan: Because I think, like what he was able to do, because he came from a different perspective. Like, I came from ‘these are kids from a show and I’ll tell you guys what to do,’ because in the beginning, that’s what I had to do. And I think, for me, it was then hard for me to see them in a different way. And I think they needed, especially a few of them, like needed, people who could see them in a different way.

Ross: Right.

Savan: And it’s kind of hard for me to see them-it was hard for me to adjust and see them in a different way. They’d be like ‘yeah, I’ll give you musical-yeah, you have musical credibility.’ ‘Cause I already had a bunch of hits with them, with people, and for me, it was like ‘you guys didn’t know what you were doing in the beginning, so why-.’ For me and looking back, I’m sure my process was like ‘but of course they don’t know what they’re doing or saying. they’re just from a show!’ You know what I mean?

Ross: Right.

Savan: And I was wrong. I was wrong to think that way, because they’re, they’ve grown into like, especially some of them, have grown into like really knowing what they’re doing. I mean, like Harry’s a fantastic writer.

Ross: We did that song. Harry and Johan [Carlsson] and I did that song [”If I Could Fly”] it was shocking how good he is.

Savan: He’s amazing.

Ross: [talking over Savan] And these kids are now working with the best writers, been on tour with the best artists, and been on tour throughout the world, you know, and your developing years spent, spending those four or five years listening to amazing writers…if you’re open-minded, and you know, these kids all should be really good.

Savan: Yeah. And at the point, it was like, yeah. And you know, it was also just the social thing, where like I had a baby during the second album. I couldn’t be around, hanging, going on tour with them, and doing that thing with them. If you haven’t had this yet, but when you like, help an artist start from the beginning and you guys are close, you start going on tour. There’s a lot of other people, they start meeting other artists and other writers. And there’s a lot of people that want to go get in there, and be in your position, and that happens, and that becomes, like, this mind fuck. So, with Harry, it was really interesting. Harry always-especially since album two-you really saw he’s a really fucking good writer. Like, we did a song together, like for the third album [”Happily”], the only thing we did for the third album, and he was just-the song “Happily” which I’m really proud of, and I think he is, as well. He was-it wasn’t like that thing, where like, writing down for the artist, he was like fucking great, like bringing ideas. So that was cool to see. But I think, especially, with like one of the particular members, it was hard to see that person, and like take that person the way he wanted to be seen, and he became, like, the loudest voice of the group. And at that point, I just told the label, it became kind of like unhappy for me to feel like, ‘why’s he doing that?’, like, so for me it became just this really heartbreaking thing, that like, he wanted, they wanted to move in a different direction. And I felt like ‘I don’t wanna lose sleep over this.’ It really felt like I can’t see it in a different way than I’m seeing it. So I think they made the-it was right for both of us. Put it that way. To not continue creatively being-

Ross: That gave you time. First of all, cutting out things that are negative as a songwriter is essential.

Savan: Yeah…

[chatter about a bad artist relationship Ross had]

Savan: Yeah…and like, Harry and I always stay in touch. Me and Zayn, at the time, were always in touch. And that…it was always, sort of like, this loving relationship. And obviously I brought Harry into our camp, and like, Johan, and you guys starting working-you guys write great music together. And I’m so proud of him. And I haven’t heard Zayn’s solo stuff, but I’ve heard it’s really good.

Ross: Do you like…have you though about working with…[Zayn], or is it sort of like, that train has sailed [laughs]?

Savan: Put it this way. For any of those boys, if they ever reached out to me and wanted help, I would, in a heartbeat, do it. Just because of loyalty. If Zayn ever said ‘look, i need your help,’ or ‘can you come listen to stuff.’ He doesn’t need me, from what I understand, it’s really good. I don’t think they want to go to me, I don’t think. I mean, maybe Harry’s different, because we’re kind of closer, and we’ll see what he does if, you know, if all that stuff. But like, um, probably until the Weeknd, I understand why Zayn wouldn’t want to. They only know me as the guy who did their early stuff, which, you know, is not the stuff that they’re proud of. Even though they know I did other stuff. I mean, Harry understands that, because he understands the music business.

Ross: But the Weeknd gives you a credibility…it opens such a big door. Like you said, Ariana opened the door for the Weeknd.

Savan: Yeah, and then, the whole, letting the One Direction thing go. It was a year of trying to find myself again. It was a super intense few years. And I lost a lot of confidence during that time. And it was Max [Martin] who helped me get out of the funk.


What have I read??? Savan is so bitter!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! How can he dare to speak this way about Louis????? and One Direction in general??? He is so disrespectful!!!

But, of course, he has to praise Harry!!!! I´m not surprised….

I can´t stand people who praise Harry, but talk shit about the other boys, because I know that Harry loves his bandmates.

anonymous asked:

🤔 Did people forget the one person who ACTUALLY worked with the boys was recently bitterly claiming that Louis was the one who wanted to change how they sounded and wanted them to start writing for themselves. 🙄

i continue to be incredibly unimpressed

anonymous asked:

Hi, (*) anon here, thnkyou for your kind response. I've sent the last part of my looongg ask. The thing is, savan worked with 1d on the first 2 album. And to think on such a short time for a band with minimal experience, to push and push and push the people bts enough that they went with it, give more control musically, although clearly not gracefully. There is no doubt who's the loudest. And I love him for that. You cant help but admired their strength. I have faith for their bright future :)

My own reaction was surprise that management bothered to listen to Louis at all, that he won in the end. If he was the problematic one and “not the singer, not the star,” why didn’t they just kick him out? They got their star. They got their singer. They could’ve made some narrative– Louis couldn’t get along with the others, etc.

The problem, for management, of giving in to Louis, was that it set a precedent. It relinquished management’s absolute control.

So by giving up creative control, they had to establish dominance in some other way, by controlling image. Image control was as much a psychological tool as a financial one. You make them feel like they’re not in control of their own social life, you play with fan perception, you’re going to play with their self-esteem.

Cue “band psychologist,” Anne Marie Thompson– also head of PR. Talk about your conflicts of interests (except there was no conflict. She wasn’t ever there to protect the boys. Psychology works both ways).

Read more here: http://business-direction.tumblr.com/post/134214607193/scrufflecake-ann-marie-thompson-is-head-of-syco

The reason Louis won in the end, in my opinion, was that he wasn’t alone. All the boys felt the same way. They wouldn’t have worked well without him. That must have been clear to management.

Management, and Savan, were clearly taken aback by this development. Hence the war we’ve seen since 2012.

What was fascinating about the interview was the skeletons it exposed. Fans are constantly being mocked for their “conspiracy” thinking about band-management disagreements. And here, in black and white, is how it went down, spelled out pretty clearly.

In case there’s any doubt about the boys needing psychological counseling, look at this interview: https://youtu.be/xHjBFCoy1yU?list=RDR8YzZQ396sE. Try not to get distracted by Harry’s beauty. At 3:25, Liam says to Harry, you should lie down on this couch and get sorted. And Harry answers, softly, wryly, I’ve already done that.

anonymous asked:

Okay now after listening to that disgusting interview I'm really really hoping that rumour from last year about Harry refusing to work with Savan is true because that would be amazing and a big fuck you to that bitter arsehole

^^^

anonymous asked:

Hi!! Why does the John Ryan post sound like Louis was a problem!? And what is with the ego connect?? Just surprised by his comments I guess. Your thoughts??

I’m listening to the podcast now, I’ll have an educated opinion when I hear it in context, but at the moment, I’m thinking that Louis was pushy and aggressive with the songwriters while in 1D so that the sound of the band was THEM not their assigned songwriters.

And the songwriters resented the fuck out of that.

But in both cases, John Ryan and Savan Kotecha have said that they get along fine with Louis now.  Julian Bunetta apparently always meshed well with Louis and he ended up being the primary writer for the band, I don’t think that’s a coincidence.

It’s just funny that John and Savan still haven’t figured out what was happening then or why Louis was so difficult for them to work with (which is the exact opposite of what Steve Aoki said about him). 

As someone else said, the ego problem wasn’t Louis’, it was the writers that just couldn’t understand why this ONE member of the band, the one with no solos, was such a loudmouth when the others would have gone along with them (at first, I’m sure they all got more confident later on). Louis wasn’t fighting for his ego, he was fighting for everyone else’s and for the quality of the band.

Honestly, I’m so fucking proud of Louis.

Savan Kotecha is an extremely talented songwriter, he wrote Can’t feel my face, Side to side, Into You, If You Seek Amy and like a shit ton more. What was his downfall with 1D, and he says it himself, was that he had this really narrow view of how much artistic talent the boys had since they came from a manufactured boyband background. That made Louis mad because they’re all talented dudes who just wanted to express themselves, and Savan wouldn’t let them. So Louis went fuck it and fuck you, we want a new writing team. 

‘...but of course they don’t know what they’re doing or saying. they’re just from a show!’

“they’re just from a show” hit me so bad like they were put together in a band because 1. it was time for a new generation of (brainless) teenage girls buying boyband merch because Westlife were in their 30s and it was already overrated and 2. we do not care about anything but the money.

THEY’RE JUST FROM A SHOW became like the hymn.

They didn’t give a fuck about them, what they felt, their opinions, ideas because as long as money came…

They should’ve been happy about it! not be ungrateful little shits and turn their backs to the people who made them who they are! They’re just from a show.

They don’t know shit about the industry and they should stick with what it’s given to them even after years of working their asses off. They’re just from a show.

They are not important, “they are the puppets and they should dance while we sing” because they don’t know how all of it works! They’re just from a show.

They saw them the same as they see us: brainless.

They thought they are JUST FROM A SHOW and they should keep their mouth shut.

They treat them like garbage: put them in a band, write pop songs for them, label them, control them and when they see they will lose control of them, ditch them and speak bad about them, because they had the BALLS to speak for themselves.

Bitter much, Savan?

anonymous asked:

(*) so this is a long rants, maybe dont publish it? Up to you, friend. I just need to talk to someone and I always like reading your response to anything so if you wouldn't mind.. I didn't hear the podcast, only from the transcript. And my readings probably not accurate. But, I have kinda similar experience with my job. Where sometime I couldn't help but wonder what the fuck am I doing here?? I get so frustrated, and Im not one to fume inside so I become very vocal with my bosses decision (**)

(**) concerning my job because they didn’t listen/read my report. And I’ll be embarrassed about my outburst but I couldnt stop and it brought me to tears sometime. And my peers cant understand the problem because they didn’t have to compromised professional integrity doing their job, they all have great relationship with our bosses. 1D come from TXF, a reality show in nature, so its gonna be full of fabricated dramatisation. As we know they were encouraged to act as certain character,

(***) although it could be derived from their true personality traits? Idk. Image is everything, even now 6 years later. I think Savan try to share his take on what happened, from a point of view of someone who already form an opinion and deemed they are not credible and consist of some talentless individual. At the end of the day, he come to do his job while the boys pursuing their dream. Louis got the opportunity to be in a vocal band, but got the least singing part. My point is, the boys

(****) My point is, the boys’ experience might be different from each other. They could empathise and I’m sure of it. They showed us they love and support and protect each other. Again, personality play a big roles on how yau handle hurts, disappointment and anger. So while all of the boys experience the exact same situation, it won’t affect them similarly. I feel like louis’s frustration translate into being ‘loud’ or probably argumentative. Savan’s fond memory of working with harry could also


Dear anon,

I might not have gotten last parts of this ask? If you have them, please send them.

First, thank you for understanding the complexity of the Golan/ Kotecha interview, for reading between the lines, and for articulating that in an empathetic way.

Now that we have all had time to digest it, I think it gives a lot of insight into the group dynamic.

Undoubtedly the powers-that-be have always seen One Direction as a manufactured product. Industry has never respected the band because of this background, despite the fact– the FACT not only voiced by fans but now, explicitly, by these two songwriters– that One Direction is not a typical boyband, that the talent is extraordinary, that their ambitions and their ability to learn the music business (from the creative to the business) was outsized.

And if Industry bothered to listen to pop podcasts, it would know that One Direction songs are actually, within the frame of their pop genre, quite good, considered by critics to be surprisingly good for a “manufactured product.”

I think Kotecha expressed his regret that 1. he underestimated them, 2. he let the psychological “mind fuck” –the antagonism he had with Louis– get in the way of helping them develop as artists, 3. he missed out on the biggest portion of their success, 4. he burned some bridges with them.

Kotecha is an incredible songwriter. I’m really glad he found his success with other big-name artists. He wrote my favorite AG song on Dangerous Woman, “Into You.”

The interview also revealed a lot about the band members’ state of mind through the first three albums. Kotecha states that none of the boys liked the music on Up All Night : it’s not music they are proud of, he says. If they disliked UAN, they would have recognized in the making of Take Me Home that Syco expected them to stay in this traditional boyband mode for all five albums– and perhaps they were already sensing the impetus to find a breakout solo act (Harry) so that the band wouldn’t finish their contract. They sensed it because that was the natural boyband trajectory, and had been for the last 30 years.

We talk about The Beatles being the first boyband, but of course, The Beatles were not put together on a reality talent show. No one expected the talent show band to last. No one expected them to have any creative or business talents. No one expected them to form any deep bonds with each other. No one expected them to do anything except bleat out tunes, look pretty, sell merch. No one expected these things because there was just no precedent. And now Kotecha’s interview basically confirmed all of this.

And imagine being in the boys’ shoes. Obviously they were going to sing whatever they were given in UAN: they were unknowns. They relied on industry experience to get to world-wide success. They would do whatever they were asked to do.

It was only after TMH, when their success became ever more apparent, that they had the courage to demand more. Even then, they were risking a lot to raise their voices. They could easily have been shouted down. And you’re right, anon, I think at some point, Kotecha felt like he was being attacked for doing exactly what he was hired to do. He felt an ownership for the creation of the 1D sound, and there was bloody mutiny from the bleating pretty faces– and not even from the talented one, or the singer.

And if Louis hadn’t been in the band, who knows who would have stepped into his place? Louis took a big risk (never play poker with him– his bluffs are deadly)– he could have been the one asked to leave. He was the loudest voice, but Kotecha sort of made it clear that it wasn’t only Louis who felt this way. Louis was simply the one willing to stick his neck out, to take the brunt of bad feelings. He risked his own career to make sure One Direction was in it for the long haul.

I wrote about “Strong” as a romantic song, but it could also be a song about camaraderie. “Waves try to break it”: it’s as poignant as any other reading.

Not only that, but Harry’s refusing to leave the band to be The Breakout Star also strengthened the band’s argument against management. They needed to be a united front, to argue for their creative independence. Perhaps Zayn’s willingness to give up on this united front is why bitter feelings ran so deeply during OTRA promo.

To Kotecha’s point about Harry’s songwriting chops, I think he is sincere. I think the songwriting community in pop music is a small one, and they don’t blow hot air around just for promo– the public doesn’t care if pop stars write their own songs, tbh. Indeed, it’s not the first time, second time, or even the tenth time we’ve heard from other songwriters that Harry is a pretty fucking good songwriter. I also think he and Harry are no longer in contact, at least not in any meaningful way, by the way Kotecha says “Harry probably would” [contact him]– at least, as of February 2016.

It’s weird, for me, to have this detailed, intimate snapshot of the band members circa 2011-2012. It adds to the complexity of the 1D boys as human beings, and I must say I love them more for this, for recognizing their mutual talents, for refusing to be ground down by the inevitable boyband gristmill, for having the vision to see their unknown futures and for wanting to be taken seriously as artists– risking their fame and celebrity in the process. They are a very special band.

anonymous asked:

i completely understand if you don't publish this but i'm with you that i'm extremely shocked (not necessarily at the people but that they're /actually/ defending this) and grossed out about the harries saying we're being dramatic or that there's nothing wrong with what he said. because i recall a few months ago when someone who worked on dunkirk posted a fan pic with harry and all they said was "despite what we all may think he's actually really great" and they went OFF.

oh i’m publishing this anyway because yeah the double standard is particularly glaring today isn’t it?

if savan was saying this shit about harry rather than louis i guarantee you the uproar from the same people defending him right now would be deafening.

And The Writer Is... with Ross Golan - Ep: 3 Savan Kotecha

[Discussing the difference between writing for someone like Britney, who will have hits regardless of who writes them, versus “breaking an act”]

Savan: …when you break an act, and even though One Direction is not, like, a credible act, but the way that they—the meetings that I had with the industry, because whether or not all the boys recognized the [?] that I did for that band from day one, everyone around it that was in charge of it, they all saw it, and that spread within the industry, and the tremendous success obviously—

Interviewer: Is that why you pulled away from them, or is it just sort of like they grew up and they kinda wanted to do their own thing? Because they want to go and try to be more credible.

Savan: They grew up. I think like, a lot in the very beginning, and I’ll take blame for some of the stuff in the very beginning—they were a manufactured boyband. That’s just what it was. They weren’t all like, hustling musicians trying to make it, they were on a TV show, and we purposefully—and I was open about that, like, you’re gonna hate the music that you do in the beginning, like I was open about that. You’re 17 year old, 18 year old boys, you’re not supposed to like the music that a boyband does, historically that’s just not how it’s going to go. And that’s what happened, but it blew up. And I think, yeah, by album three, not all of them, but there was definitely one or two—one especially—that was like, kind of bitter about the fact that—

Interviewer: That they’re a boyband?

Savan: And he was not the talented one, and he wasn’t a singer, and he wasn’t a star—and you know which one I’m talking about.

Interviewer: Of course, right.

Savan: And he then started having something against me and [?] and against that process I think, and you know maybe we could’ve been more inviting on the creative process during album two and not been so authoritative, but you know what happened was also that I knew them from day one when they would cry on my shoulder when stuff—because I was with them through the show and developing them. No one knew what that thing could be or who could sing lead or what that was, that was me helping shape that thing. And especially the first record, you know, the label wanted—there was this stargate-like Rihanna reject dance-y song that they really wanted to do, and I was like, “No, that can’t be the direction,” you know, because they were like my little brothers. I had a lot invested in my time and emotionally in these kids, with their parents and everything.

Interviewer: Because of the show?

Savan: Because of the show. The UK show’s really intense, and you become family—three months—and um, I loved those kids, I will always pick of the phone is any of them call, even that one, that, you know. And I remember even with Julian, you know, I had to convince some of them that you should go in with [Gino?], he’s really good, you should totally go in with him, you know. And I think like, um, and when they did—I’m really happy for Julian and all them, because I think what he was able to do—because he came from a different perspective, like I came from: “These are kids from a show, and I’ll tell you guys what to do,” because in the beginning that’s what I had to do. And I think for me it was hard to then see them in a different way. I think they needed, especially like a few of them, needed people to see them in a different way. And it’s kind of hard for me to see them, it was hard for me to adjust and see them in a different way. Like, yeah, I’ll give you musical, yeah you have musical credibility to me, because I already had a bunch of hits with other people for me, and you guys didn’t know what you were doing in the beginning, so why—for me in my mind, now when I’m looking back, I’m like, I’m sure my process was like, “But of course they don’t know what they’re doing, what they’re saying, like, they’re just from a show,” you know what I mean? And I was wrong to think that way, because they’re, um, they’ve grown into, especially some of them, have grown into really knowing what they’re doing. I mean, Harry’s a fantastic writer. 

Interviewer: We did that song, uh, Harry and Eoghan and I did that song, and… it was shocking how good he is.

Savan: He’s amazing, yeah, but we knew that—

Interviewer: But these kids are working with the best writers and been on tour with the best artists and throughout the world, you know, you’re developing years spending those four or five years listening to amazing writers, if you’re open minded, and these guys all should be really good at this point.

Savan: Yeah, and at the point, it was like, you know, it was also the social thing where I had a baby during the second album, I couldn’t be around hanging and going on tour with them, and doing that thing, and [stammering] if you know how it is, yeah, when you help, like, start an artist from the beginning and you guys are close, you’ll understand when they go on tour, there’s a lot of other people, they start meeting other artists, and there’s a lot of people that want to go get in there, and be in your position, and that happens, so that becomes like this mindfuck. So, um, but with Harry it was really interesting because Harry always from the start of album two you really saw that he’s a fucking good writer. Like we did a song together for the third album, the only thing we did for the third album, and he was just—this song ‘Happily’ which I’m really proud of and I think he is as well, he was—it wasn’t like that thing where you’re like writing down for the artist, he was fucking great at bringing ideas. So that was cool to see, but I think especially with one of the particular members it was hard to see that person, and take that person, the way he wanted to be seen, I think, and he became the loudest voice in the group. And then there was a point where I just told the label, it became sort of unhappy for me to feel that like, “Why’s he doing that?” Like, um, so, to me it became this really heartbreaking thing that I felt like, I think he wanted to—they wanted to move in a different direction, and I felt like I don’t want to lose sleep over this, and I really felt like, I can’t see it in a different way than I’ve seen it, and that, and so I think they made the right—it was right for both of us, put it that way, to not continue creatively being a thing.

Interviewer: That gave you time—first of all, cutting out things that are negative as a songwriter is essential. [Talks about himself for a while]

Savan: It was hard to let go, it was so big, and they were everywhere, and every time I’d go to a store I would see their face, and it was a little bit heartbreaking. But again, and it’s not for everyone, but like, me and Harry will always stay in touch, me and Zayn at the time were always in touch, [stammering] some of them, there’s always like this loving relationship, and obviously I brought Harry into our camp working with Eoghan [Yohan?] and you guys started working, and you guys write great music together, and I’m so proud of him. And I know, I haven’t heard Zayn’s solo stuff, but I’ve heard it’s really good.

Interviewer: Have you tried—have you wanted to work on their solo stuff, or is now that train has sailed?

Savan: Put it this way, for any of those boys, if they ever reached out to me and wanted to help, I would in a heartbeat do it, just because of loyalty, I wouldn’t—you know, if Zayn ever said, “Look, I need your help, will you come listen to stuff,” he doesn’t need me, from what I understand it’s really good. I had one conversation with him about—but, I don’t think they want to go to me, I think maybe Harry’s a different thing because we’re kind of closer and we’ll see what he does, if, you know, if all that stuff—but like, um, probably until The Weeknd, I understand why Zayn wouldn’t think—because they all only know me as the guy that did, like, their early stuff, which isn’t the stuff that they’re proud of, even though they knew I did other stuff. I mean, Harry understands that because Harry understands the music business, and he knows—

Interviewer: But The Weeknd gives you credibility to allow you to, I mean, it opens up such a big doorway. I mean, like you said, Ariana opened the doorway for the Weekend—

Savan: And the whole, letting the whole One Direction thing kind of go was a year of trying to find myself again because it was a super intense few years and, um, I lost a lot of confidence during that time…

anonymous asked:

Yesterday when Harru said that his favorite song off the album was "A little bit of my heart", I remembered "Two Ghosts", "Do not let me go" and stockholm syndrome. Harry looks like that poet in a relationship in which after a fight, he takes a bottle of drink, a cigarette and a guitar and writes his wounds. And Louis from his writing, is the one who comes home, sees him fall, and says "ok baby, I love you, let's solve this.

I think about:

1. Their tattoos. Louis is the one who finds the way out. He is the compass home.
2. Harry is the Rose. Louis is the Dagger.
3. Louis was the one who confronted Savan Kotecha about getting more control of their music, and by extension of their image.
4. Savan acknowledged Louis as the de facto leader.
5. Harry has a tattoo of a bird cage. Of hangers. Of the Bible. Of an eagle.
6. Louis “It is what it is” Tomlinson. Rolls up sleeves and gets to work.
7. Louis: 28
8. Harry is the Little Spoon.
9. Louis watching over Harry on the bed during the “Perfect” music video shoot
10. “The wind makes nice waves.” “That is true, Harry.”
11. Achuoo = Harry + Louis in Doris talk (this is from @larry-god-mother)
12. The shared costume closet during OTRA
13. Louis’s hand on Harry’s back
14. In that iconic video where they’re walking backstage during OTRA, and Harry’s fixing his hair and Louis wipes his mouth, Louis is walking behind Harry. Always walking behind Harry.
15. Louis brings bottles of water onstage for Harry. Kicks away empty bottles for Harry.
16. SBB is the GROOM

Should I go on?

anonymous asked:

saying that someone is talentless is not giving your perspective, it's insulting them. as someone who tends to be shy and reserved, i know a lot of people including myself who'd kill to have Louis' personality and attitude. he's so much more than what savan reduced him to in that interview. he's got so much to offer and not just with song-writing but with his charistmatic and fun persona. he is a story-teller and he's so talented in so many ways.

i’m just like *puts on battle gear* I WILL FIGHT YOU SAVAN AND YOU WILL LOSE