Sam-and-Carlie

a list of people Jill Ellis fucked over in 2016:

Heather O'Reilly
Christen Press
Ali Krieger
Ashlyn Harris
Crystal Dunn
Tobin Heath
Whitney Engen
Mallory Pugh
Morgan Brian
Alex Morgan
Kelley O'Hara
Becky Sauerbrunn
Lindsey Horan
Julie Johnston
Meghan Klingenberg
Alyssa Naeher
Carli Lloyd
Emily Sonnett
Sam Mewis
Dawn Scott
Every single USWNT fan

Sam Esmail is off his fucking rocker and I’m beyond into it. While a lot of critics are discounting last night’s episode of Mr. Robot because of its wacky first part, I am still all in with this show. The second half left me with such an uneasy feeling that I haven’t felt since the first season. Like, bitch was freaking out. And that’s what I want from my TV shows. Fuck being happy all the time. I want you to take me to a place that leaves me stressed and begging for more.

vine

Love this “I SECOND THAT VOTE! MR ROBOT MUSICAL!?”

Made with Vine
Summer Bummer: Why the Failed Revolution of ‘Mr. Robot’ Is Exactly What We Need

What makes Mr. Robot unique is that it weds its politics to its emotional and visual palette. “We’re exploring what loneliness looks like today,” Esmail has said, and he’s dead on. This starts with the singular look cinematographer Tod Campbell has established for the show: characters “shortsighted” against the edge of the frame, like people staring into their laptop screens or smartphones; vast empty spaces above and around them, creating a sense of isolation and oppression. It extends to how Esmail and his fellow writers script the thing: Elliot and his companions communicate primarily the way most young people do these days—digitally. Text messages are more common than face-to-face meetings, which are riddled with anxiety when they do take place; even phone calls are reserved for only the most crucial information. Angela ensconces herself in the sonic womb of her headphones. Elliot stares listlessly at his few friends and his computer screen alike. Even relative go-getter FBI agent Dom DiPierro masturbates joylessly while sexting between bouts of insomnia. Talk to anyone who really loves Mr. Robot this season and you’ll get the same message: This show speaks to how it looks, sounds, and feels to be alienated in 2016, alone in a house or apartment with the internet at your fingertips and a world outside you but no real human connections.

That’s the difference between Mr. Robot and other political dramas—or, for that matter, between Mr. Robot and other shows that attempt to capture, and even succeed in capturing, young urban ennui, like Girls. It depicts the way political failure and personal failure blend together in our hearts and minds, becoming this inextricable, sticky depressive goo. It’s televised weltschmerz, and not since The Sopranos and The Wire were on has anyone done it better.

Mr. Robot’s first season was televised catharsis: a bracing breath of fresh political air on the TV landscape, unafraid to call out corporate and cultural malefactors by name and construct a story in which these evildoers could be taken down a peg or two. But to continue in that direction would be to betray the plight in which America finds itself—it would be a left-wing version of The Walking Dead’s hyper-violent paean to protecting ourselves from the dreaded outsiders by any means necessary. The bullet fsociety attempted to fire into the head of E Corp was no more fatal than the imaginary ones Elliot’s Mr. Robot blasted into his own brain. For the problems the show is confronting, there is no magic bullet; there may well be no remedy at all. That’s an unpleasant message, but that makes it all the more vital to hear. By wedding its political critique to intensely personal anxieties, Mr. Robot delivers that message loud and clear.

I wrote a defense of Mr. Robot Season Two for the New York Observer.