STEM-IN-THE-CLASSROOM

journals.plos.org
Males Under-Estimate Academic Performance of Their Female Peers in Undergraduate Biology Classrooms
Women who start college in one of the natural or physical sciences leave in greater proportions than their male peers. The reasons for this difference are complex, and one possible contributing factor is the social environment women experience in the classroom. Using social network analysis, we explore how gender influences the confidence that college-level biology students have in each other’s mastery of biology. Results reveal that males are more likely than females to be named by peers as being knowledgeable about the course content. This effect increases as the term progresses, and persists even after controlling for class performance and outspokenness. The bias in nominations is specifically due to males over-nominating their male peers relative to their performance. The over-nomination of male peers is commensurate with an overestimation of male grades by 0.57 points on a 4 point grade scale, indicating a strong male bias among males when assessing their classmates. Females, in contrast, nominated equitably based on student performance rather than gender, suggesting they lacked gender biases in filling out these surveys. These trends persist across eleven surveys taken in three different iterations of the same Biology course. In every class, the most renowned students are always male. This favoring of males by peers could influence student self-confidence, and thus persistence in this STEM discipline.
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Top 5 Emerging EdTech Trends you Must Know in 2016
We are looking at the top 5 big trends in e-learning and education technology that can change the teaching-learning in 2016 and beyond. Below are some key ideas for online educators as well as for teach-preneurs in E-learning and educational technology. Discover how internet of things connected classroom, Open Educational Resources, Microlearning, MakerSpaces and Coding in Classroom will disrupt classrooms of 2016
Summer STEM Camp 2016 schedule now live!

Summer STEM Camp 2016 schedule now live!

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White Plains, Westchester, NY– The Digital Arts Experience’s (The DAE) 2016 Summer STEM / Tech / Computer Camp schedule is now live! Programs range from:

  • 3D Printing
  • Animation
  • Coding & Computer Programming
  • Electronics
  • Design
  • LEGO
  • Minecraft
  • …and more!

Still in the process of filling out the schedule, The DAE has a solid base of their “bread & butter” programs already available for registration. B…

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((Bedtime, round two. I’ll be mobile until sleep comes for me. I should be around tomorrow, but (and I will make an official announcement when I know the plan) I will be on semi-hiatus this coming week. I’m helping my mom with her big conference a week from tomorrow/today and I don’t know how much will be required of me. It’ll be super rad. Leading scientists and educators teaching K-12 teachers about advances in STEM fields and education and how to implement it in the classroom. My super nerd self is stoked to be proctoring workshops on genetics and forensic anthropology. It’ll be good. I just have to keep reminding myself that there are positive things coming this week that need my attention just as much as the not-so-positive.))

Inclusion + Diversity = Tolerance + Aggression

First published January 22, 2016 in the Carletonian

By Faculty and Staff Anti-Oppression Workshops (FSAOW)

Who are we? What do we want?

FSAOW (Faculty and Staff Anti-Oppression Workshops) stemmed from conversations among a few students of color about classroom and workplace dynamics at Carleton, from which they realized that systems of oppression (racism, sexism, homophobia, ableism, etc.) are not only overt in those spaces but also work in insidious, normalized ways. Since then, a collective of students has tried to tackle this issue, despite receiving a lukewarm response from the administration.

Essentially, FSAOW represents a group of students who are concerned about classroom and workplace climates that further marginalize students with diverse, underrepresented identities. Through conversation with our peers from various campus communities, we have found that different academic and student life spaces, from classrooms, to professor’s office hours, intercultural events, residential life arrangements, etc. in their current state can actually hinder many students’ ability to learn. As Carleton’s policy indicates, it was only in recent years that the school has mandated that its new faculty and staff members enroll in “diversity” training, indicating a huge knowledge gap among faculty and staff members on how to address and tackle issues of oppression and equality in their work spaces. Therefore, FSAOW is asking that all faculty and staff members, old or new, participate in mandatory anti-oppression training periodically.

“Stop feeling attacked and blaming the world for your personal problems. There’s no oppression at Carleton. Everyone’s safe.”

Let us begin by recognizing that Carleton as an institution is not immune to systems of oppression dominating the “outside” world. Rather, this school is part of the problem. We recognize that not all professors or staff members share these problems on the same level, and the population we seem to be “accusing” is not homogenous. Many faculty and staff with marginalized identities also experience biases on a daily basis.

With this in mind, we suggest that the particular power hierarchy in student/faculty, student/ staff relationship exacerbates acts of oppression.

On this campus, people seem to be more comfortable using the term “micro-aggression.” Our question is, what is so “micro” about these acts of aggression? The use of this term seems to trivialize and excuse acts with severe consequences that happen every day in classrooms and workplaces. Since last fall, FSAOW has been working on collecting student stories involving offensive incidents that are biased in nature. These stories show that students have often become disengaged from classes or work, quit classes or work, and, on occasion, even left Carleton temporarily or permanently. When a professor comments on an ESL student’s presentation, “they speak kind of funny sometimes,” it is hard to imagine a positive, engaged learning environment as Carleton promises its classroom to be.

Instead of “micro-aggression,” we choose to use the term, “micro-oppression.” These acts, to their core, are parts of systems of oppression inflicted on an interpersonal scale, leaving permanent scars on our students. For clarification, FSAOW as a group is not advocating for absolutely “safe” spaces as we recognize that students need challenging and stimulating environments to learn. What we are advocating for is an environment where faculty and staff are better equipped to deal with systemic inequities, and so do not hinder student learning and personal development.

“What do you mean by anti-oppression? Isn’t it just diversity training?”

Diversity is an end-all-be-all buzzword that obscures our understanding of how systemic violence (racism, sexism, able- ism, etc.) is insidiously at work on Carleton’s campus. It has become an empty, symbolic promise from an institution unable to address the core of these problems. The word, diversity, itself distracts us from other terms such as “oppression,” “justice,” or “equality.”

We act as though a single “diversity training” can cleanse us of problems of “diversity.” We fail to acknowledge that oppression is at work before and after that training session, and that recognizing these problems is not the same as actively working against oppression. Thus, FSAOW works towards “anti-oppression,” not “diversity.” It is our sincere hope that the institution recognizes as we do these problems affecting student learning and development, and work with, among, and for us on combating systemic oppression at Carleton.

Indogro Institute in associate with iCarnegie, STEM Education solution providers, founded by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, have merged to form a global Computer Science and STEM education solutions company.

Our mission is to make research-based STEM educational solutions accessible to every global classroom.

#indogroinstitute #icarnegie #stem #science #technology #engineering #math #program #computer #education #future #solution #global #international

Orange and Rockland To Award $25,000 in Grants

Orange and Rockland To Award $25,000 in Grants

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Orange and Rockland Utilities has announced that it will award grants totaling $25,000 again this year to support classroom projects and teacher professional-development initiatives focusing on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). O&R STEM Classroom Grants Program The O&R STEM Classroom Grants program will award 25 grants of up to $1,000 each to educators at schools…

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How this STEM school is shattering stereotypes
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Calientalo.com
How this STEM school is shattering stereotypes

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Dr. Ellis Crasnow (center) with students on the first day of school.

At STEM3 Academy, sticking to the norm doesn’t work.

In fact, the school was launched to do just the opposite.

“Our emphasis is on learning versus teaching,” said Dr. Ellis Crasnow, the school’s director. “Our students learn by doing, experiencing and constructing rather than just sitting in a classroom listening to a teacher.”

STEM3 Academy largely focuses on “STEM” subjects: science, technology, engineering and math). Teachers there use a “flipped classroom” model. This means that time in class is used to complete projects and homework assignments, while time at home is spent reviewing the next day’s lessons.

The Los Angeles school took an out-of-the-box approach for a specific reason: All of its students have a learning challenge, like autism-spectrum disorder, Asperger’s and ADHD.

The students are especially gifted in subjects like math and science, but have fallen behind in their social and communication skills. (The curriculum also includes traditional subjects like English, art and language.)

“As far as we know, we’re the nation’s only STEM-curriculum school for students with these needs,” said Crasnow. “Our goal is to help them realize their potential for achievement in school, in college and later in a STEM-based career.”

Related: Wanted: 100,000 new STEM teachers

STEM3 Academy is part of The Help Group, a nonprofit that runs 10 special-needs focused schools in the L.A. area. It opened as a high school with 30 students in August 2015. As word spread, Crasnow started getting calls from parents nationwide. Two months later, it added middle school. The school now has 60 students in grades 6-12.

About 75% of the students at STEM3 are placed by a district program (which pays the tuition). Otherwise, tuition is $ 35,000.

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STEM3 Academy has an innovation lab that’s equipped with a CNC machine, 3D printer, CAD machines and electronics. It also offers programs in robotics, entrepreneurship and programming. Much of the learning is based on group work to facilitate social interaction (the students sit at large communal tables).

“The statistics are telling,” said Crasnow. “We know that 34% of students with these learning challenges that go on to college chose STEM majors.”

Some large companies — including defense contractor Raytheon (RTN) and aerospace and defense technology company Northrop Grumman (NOC) — have already approached the school about potentially working with the students.

Related: The most innovative schools on America

Terry Whiteside’s son Cullen is a junior at the STEM3. He was previously in two other schools in The Help Group’s network. Whiteside said Cullen,who has autism, is gifted in math and programming, but struggled socially before coming to STEM3.

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STEM3 Academy students in the Innovation Lab.

“It’s been a big change,” she said. “Before he wouldn’t talk much about his day. Now he comes home and has conversations with me about what he did at school.”

Related: This is how you make math fun

She compared this to his performance growing up — his standardized test results were poor, even though she knew how bright he was.

“What’s so amazing to us as parents is how far Cullen has grown since we started the educational journey,” she said, adding that he tested in the 99th percentile of the PSAT and has had interest from several top-rate colleges.

Cullen symbolizes what STEM3 Academy is trying to achieve.

“The stats regarding the post high school success of students with special needs is very poor. 80% to 90% of them are unemployed or underemployed,” said Crasnow. “These are horrific numbers and our goal is to change them.”

Crasnow said STEM3 Academy will become a K-12 school by the end of the year.

“We want our students to be able to stand side by side with their typical peers after they graduate,” he said.

Small business news – CNNMoney.com

How this STEM school is shattering stereotypes


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Coding and Robotics for K-5 with Dash & Dot
Wonder Workshop
Genre: Education
Price: Get
Publish Date: May 29, 2015

Dash & Dot are exciting, hands-on learning tools for students in grades K–5. Targeted at teaching creative problem solving and computational thinking, they help students learn fundamental processes relevant for all 21st century skills. This book provides teachers with ideas on how to integrate Dash & Dot in the classroom for coding and other STEM subjects. These activities are designed to encourage students to think in new ways, with a hands-on application.

7 Valentine's Day Experiments That Will Make Your Child Fall in Love With Science

Getting children involved in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math education) beyond the classroom may seem like a daunting feat, but it doesn’t have to be hard! This Valentine’s Day, explore the world of science with your kiddo through a love-themed experiment that will make them adore science.

Read through for seven engaging kid experiments to do this Feb. 14. http://bit.ly/1nY0S8W

Coding and Robotics for K-5 with Dash & Dot
Wonder Workshop
Genre: Education
Price: Get
Publish Date: May 29, 2015

Dash & Dot are exciting, hands-on learning tools for students in grades K–5. Targeted at teaching creative problem solving and computational thinking, they help students learn fundamental processes relevant for all 21st century skills. This book provides teachers with ideas on how to integrate Dash & Dot in the classroom for coding and other STEM subjects. These activities are designed to encourage students to think in new ways, with a hands-on application.

Learning Brick By Brick - Big Research Centre | Education |781517386

Learning Brick By Brick
Big Research Centre
Genre: Education
Price: Get
Publish Date: December 13, 2013

This is our first evaluation and as Research Active Learners we investigated the views and experiences of pupils aged   between 9 to 11 years attending one of nine Primary schools in South Wales.  We asked them for their views and experiences about using STEM Lego Technology in the classroom and we used new digital technologies to do this.  The results of the evaluation are contained in this report and we have made a number of important recommendations.

Learning Brick By Brick - Big Research Centre | Education |781517386

Learning Brick By Brick
Big Research Centre
Genre: Education
Price: Get
Publish Date: December 13, 2013

This is our first evaluation and as Research Active Learners we investigated the views and experiences of pupils aged   between 9 to 11 years attending one of nine Primary schools in South Wales.  We asked them for their views and experiences about using STEM Lego Technology in the classroom and we used new digital technologies to do this.  The results of the evaluation are contained in this report and we have made a number of important recommendations.

Build a Balloon Rock

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Build a Balloon Rocket with Kids from Carrots Are Orange! Introduce physics to your kids with this awesome activity! Such a fun and easy way to integrate science learning into the home and classroom! #montessori #stem #ece

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baltimoremagazine.net
Kevin Plank Donates $5 Million to East Baltimore Youth Center

The expansion includes covered turf field, yoga studio, and neighborhood kitchen. |

On Tuesday, the Living Classrooms Foundation announced that a youth recreation center in Pleasant View Gardens will receive a significant renovation, funded by a $5 million donation from Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank.

The facility, located at 1100 E. Fayette Street and formerly known as the Carmelo Anthony Center, will undergo a 10,000-square-foot expansion that includes a covered turf field, state-of-the-art STEM classroom, workforce and entrepreneurship center, dance and yoga studios, a recording studio, and a neighborhood kitchen. Officials estimate that the construction will be completed by early summer.

“I really have no words for it,” says Travis Street, director of the youth center. “I grew up in this neighborhood, I grew up in poverty. When I was their age, I didn’t have these types of opportunities. I feel privileged to even be a part of it.”

Currently, organizers from the Living Classrooms are in the “needs assessment” phase of the project, in which they’re knocking on doors of the 201 units in Pleasant View Gardens to ask what they’d want out of the new community center.

“At the top of a lot of people’s priority list are programs for entrepreneurship and workforce development,” Street says. “Whether it’s teaching our students about resume writing, or how to dress for success on an interview, these are important keys for the community.”

Currently, the youth center serves 130 students from five feeder schools in Southeast Baltimore. The after-school program provides healthy meals, homework help, and art outlets. Living Classrooms hopes that Plank’s $5 million donation, plus $1.275 million for general programing, will further expand its reach.

“We’ve put together a pretty exciting canvas for this center,” says Living Classrooms CEO and president James Piper Bond. “We’ll have an incredible music studio where we’ll be working with Thomas Dolby. Our outdoor basketball court, which is kind of crummy, will be a turf with a pavilion so it can be used year-round. Our computer labs will allow our kids to learn code. We’ll be building a kitchen not only to provide healthy meals, but so our kids can start a local catering company. Working with Dr. [Leana] Wen in the health department, our yoga and dance studios will provide fitness. This center will be the heartbeat of this community.”

Another aspect of the yet-to-be-named youth center is providing multi-generational guidance.

“How cool wold it be, just hypothetically speaking, if we had a GED program for the parents during the day, and then after-school programs for the kids?” Street says. “Every portion of the day, we want this building to be lively.”

Living Classrooms aims to begin construction by the end of February and is already planning summer programming.

“I started out as a community organizer in Perkins Homes when I was 14,” Street said. “This is my passion, to help disrupt the cycle of poverty. These kids are our future doctors, lawyers, reporters, and so on. This center will be a place for them to take ownership of their community and of themselves.”

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via Baltimore magazine at http://www.baltimoremagazine.net/2016/2/3/kevin-plank-donates-5-million-to-east-baltimore-youth-center