STAIND

I Used To Sing.

Before I seriously considered being an artist, cartoonist or novelist, I wanted to be a singer. Not only did I want to be a singer, I wanted to sing Symphonic Rock or Ballads and even old-style Linkin Park/Evanescence-style music. I wanted this dream so badly, I made sure I attended every music class I could.

I was absolutely successful in the school choirs I participated in. From seventh grade’s beginning course to eighth grade’s ‘Honor Choir’ to the Tempe District Honor Choir. All I gained was a personal confidence —- the medals and awards mattered little. Even as I dealt with my personal issues, I could set that aside because I knew I had a skill.

On a break from singing, I took guitar in my Freshman year of High School. Of course, I had to start fresh, and I wanted to add another instrument to my resume of musical attributes. I plucked strings throughout the year —- not just guitar strings. Somehow, I managed to feel like a bother to the other students (mostly men) in the class because of my presence alone, so I kept to myself.

For our class final, we had to cover a song. I covered Staind’s ‘It’s Been A While.’ Not only did I feel this represented my emotional state, but this was a song directly connected to my estranged father. I decided to sing the lyrics as well —- but I shut myself up in the middle of the song because I broke into tears. I finished the song on the guitar and then turned my back to my class. I did not want them to see me after that.

I passed. Yes, I passed, but I still felt like a failure because I did not do enough. 

The next year, I switched back from guitar to choir.

I might have been in the beginning section but I proved to be a bit of an “advanced-staged” rebel. When the higher-ups would sing songs that I would know, I would join as an Alto or Soprano. Of course, this angered the teacher, but he never found out it was me. I tried to get more involved, but the others were socially better than me. Just because they could talk about boys and girls and everything that has to do with material life, I was left looking at the piano I was not allowed to play.

When I did get recognition —- Rookie of the Year —- I could not speak because I felt I did not do anything to deserve it besides sing.

The next year was a little better. I felt I had the teacher’s approval and that was all I needed. I thrived a little more than usual, and I was reminded of the success in middle school —- even with the naysayers.

Of course, the other students believed others were way better because they were more ‘in.’ So, I still kept to myself and did what I have to do.

Senior year —- the year after the choir basically disbanded due to the teacher’s departure —- I would try to get some singing in. I would occasionally get upset if someone else sang and everyone flocked to them, but I had a goal —- to sing the Star Spangled Banner in front of my peers.

In late November of 2010, I got that chance. This would be in front of everyone —- including the teachers and naysayers. I just wanted to make a certain teacher proud. I told her this many times.

I thought I had belted out my best rendition. I was given high-fives, nods and smiles.

Then, I went to her.

She told me, “It was —- okay,” with a shrug and shaking her head in a ‘Hell No,’ type of way. Shocked and shattered, I cried and left the room. Needless to say, I did not go to her class. The one teacher I wanted to sing for did not appreciate what I had done for her. She did the same when I tried the Cafeteria job. She also did the same for my art projects after the whole singing bit.

After that day, I decided to put down the microphone. I could not make someone happy. Her answer, to me, meant I should regret even opening my mouth. I still have trouble speaking, because I feel my words will not matter.

I want to pick up the microphone again. Next time, I want to do it for me, and not for someone who will not appreciate my efforts.

We need more shaming of people who molest others at shows (also, everywhere):

“Alright, listen up, you f*cking *ssholes,” Lewis said. “That f*cking girl right there is, like, 15 f*cking years old, and you f*cking pieces of sh*t are molesting her while she’s on the f*cking crowd.”

“Your f*cking mothers should be ashamed of themselves, you pieces of sh*t,” Lewis continued. “You should all be f*cking beaten down by everyone around you for being f*cking pieces of sh*t. If I f*cking see that sh*t again, I swear to God, I will point you out in the crowd and have everyone around you beat your f*cking *ss.”

Outside
  • Outside
  • Staind
  • Break the Cycle [Australia Bonus Track]
Play

But I’m on the outside
And I’m looking in
I can see through you
See your true colours
‘Cause inside you’re ugly
You’re ugly like me
I can see through you
See to the real you

youtube

Staind Singer Stops Concert To Berate ‘F*cking *ssholes’ Molesting Crowd-Surfing Teenage Girl

The lead singer for Staind stopped the grunge rock band’s concert Saturday to berate concertgoers who were inappropriately touching a crowd-surfing teenage fan.

Aaron Lewis interrupted the band’s performance of “Something To Remind You” during Rockfest in Kansas City to make an announcement.

“Alright, listen up, you f*cking *ssholes,” Lewis said. “That f*cking girl right there is, like, 15 f*cking years old, and you f*cking pieces of sh*t are molesting her while she’s on the f*cking crowd.”

Video shot by a concertgoer captured the singer’s rant, which was cheered by the crowd as the girl apparently continues crowd-surfing.

“Your f*cking mothers should be ashamed of themselves, you pieces of sh*t,” Lewis continued. “You should all be f*cking beaten down by everyone around you for being f*cking pieces of sh*t. If I f*cking see that sh*t again, I swear to God, I will point you out in the crowd and have everyone around you beat your f*cking *ss.”

Right Here
  • Right Here
  • Staind
  • Chapter V
Play

I know I’ve been mistaken
But just give me a break and see the changes that I’ve made
I’ve got some imperfections
But how can you collect them all and throw them in my face

But you always find a way to keep me right here waiting
You always find the words to say to keep me right here waiting
And if you chose to walk away I’d still be right here waiting
Searching for the things to say to keep you right here waiting

I hope you’re not intending
To be so condescending it’s as much as i can take
and you’re so independent
you just refuse to bend so I keep bending till I break

I’ve made a commitment
I’m willing to bleed for you
I needed fulfillment
I found what I need in you

Why can’t you just forgive me
I don’t want to relive all the mistakes I’ve made along the way
But I always find a way to keep you right here waiting
I always find the words to say to keep you right here waiting

But you always find a way to keep me right here waiting
You always find the words to say to keep me right here waiting
And if I chose to walk away would you be right here waiting
Searching for the things to say to keep me right here waiting

Staind Frontman Calls Out Crowd For “Molesting” Crowdsurfer

Staind played Rockfest this past weekend. Frontman Aaron Lewis went off on members of the crowd for apparently “molesting” a young female adult while crowd surfing. Read a transcript and watch a video below after the jump.

Keep reading

Layne had such a profound influence on rock music that he is not only celebrated by Alice in Chains, but other artists as well.
Layne befriended and inspired many. Here is a look at some tribute songs to the great Layne Staley:

~LAYNE by Black Label Society: The door-knocking sound at the end of the track has been said to be a symbolic representation of the police knocking on Layne’s door as well as Layne knocking on Heaven’s door.

~SHADOW by Theory of a Deadman: Conveys the sadness when Layne faded away

~JUST A BULLET AWAY by Metallica: Layne served as an inspiration for the band’s 2008 album. They even hung a photo of Layne in their studio, according to their interview with Guitar World.
In a separate interview with Rolling Stone, James explained, “I know Jerry Cantrell quite well and learned about Layne through him… I could see some of the things Jerry went through to keep that band together. I started writing a song around a Layne Staley type – a rock ‘n’ roll martyr magnetized by death. Why did he choose that path, someone with such talent?”

~LAYNE by Staind: On the day that Layne passed, Staind singer Aaron Lewis witnessed the birth of his daughter Zoe Jane.
April 5, 2002 became a date that would be bittersweet for Lewis. A few weeks later it was discovered that Layne — a huge inspiration to Lewis’ sound — passed the same day.
The influence Layne had on Lewis came through clearly in his tribute.

~4/20/02 by Pearl Jam: Included as the hidden track on Pearl Jam rarities ‘Lost Dogs,’
'4/20/02' starts playing 4 minutes and 20 seconds after 'Bee Girl' stops playing.
Eddie Vedder recorded the song on guitar with ukelele tuning the day he heard the news of his friend’s passing.
Alice in Chains and Pearl Jam (then Mookie Blaylock) often played gigs together and the members of the two bands remained friends over the years.
You can hear the pain in Eddie’s voice as he warns the terrors of addiction — “It could be you” — and takes a shot at all the Layne imitators — “So sing just like him fuckers It won’t offend him just me because he’s dead.

~”BARGAIN BASEMENT HOWARD HUGHES by Jerry Cantrell
Though it was never directly confirmed, this song from ‘Degradation Trip’ seems like Jerry’s open apology to Layne for a number of things. Specifically the line “Your life I belittle dignity I’d steal now I know how it feels.” 

Though it was released just months after Layne’s passing, the album was written and recorded well before.

~THE DAY SEATTLE DIED by Cold
A tribute to Layne, as well as Cobain

~LAYNE TO REST by Katastrophy Wife (Kat Bjelland’s band)

~BLACK GIVES WAY TO BLUE by Alice in Chains:
Easily the most touching and hauntingly beautiful song inspired by Layne’s life written by Jerry. He explains.

“I think of anything off this record, obviously “Black Gives Way to Blue” is the most difficult song, without a doubt. Even cutting that song, you can hear it in my voice. You can’t really hide that. I don’t even know how I got through the recording of that, but I just kept fucking slugging away. It was producer Nick Raskulinecz, our drummer Sean, and me in a room, and all of us are crying  our fucking eyes out. Sean’s having fucking anxiety attacks and I’m fucking just holding onto the mic stands, [trying to] get through the fucking thing. And it was very difficult, even on the writing of that song. There was a huge chunk of grief there I’d been holding on to for a long time — I think we all have. And by writing that song, it kind of puked it out. So that probably triggered a big part of a mourning process that probably didn’t happen right at the time Layne passed away. And I think a big part of that, for me, was that I dropped a record right when he died and I had to go on the road, so I probably was carrying a shitload of stuff around. And probably still will. Like I said, it’s never gonna be right.”

Sources:
Inked Magazine
Guitar World
Rolling Stone
Loud Wire