SCIENCE

Ancient Oceans on Mars

It is now widely accepted that Mars was once a very wet place. About four billion years ago Mars would have had enough water to cover its entire surface in a liquid layer about 140 metres deep. It is likely that the liquid would have pooled to form an ocean occupying almost half of Mars’s northern hemisphere, and in some regions reaching depths greater than 1.6 kilometres. This artist’s impression shows what the planet may have looked like with its ancient ocean. Imagine: could life have lived in such a place?

Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser

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ART PRINTS BY BARRUF DESIGNS

  1. Abstract Galaxies 2 
  2. The colors of the galaxy 
  3. Abstract Galaxies 4 
  4. The Colors Of The Galaxy 2 

Also available as canvas prints, T-shirts, tapestries, stationery cards, laptop skins, wall clocks, mugs, rugs, duvet covers, All over print shirts, Phone cases, Throw pillows, tote bags and More!

This might be the most awesome combination of science and design I’ve seen: a clock created by Zelf Koelman that displays time with liquid. It’s called Ferrolic after the ferrofluid which can display recognizable shapes in response to magnets embedded inside the clock’s aluminum frame.

A ferrofluid (put together of ferromagnetic and fluid) is a liquid that becomes strongly magnetized in the presence of a magnetic field. It  was invented in 1963 by NASA’s Steve Papell as a liquid rocket fuel.

Ferrolic is controlled by an intelligent internal system that is accessible trough a web-browser. The inventor wrote in this way users can assign “the creatures” to display time, text, shapes and transitions. The clocks are more of a prototype so far, the first ones were available at a price of about $8,000 each.

see the video and more information here

Our Milky Way Galaxy was once thought to comprise the entire known universe. Today our universe encompasses many billions of galaxies, and its history can be recounted back to its earliest moments.

Our universe began with an explosion of space itself - the Big Bang. Starting from extremely high density and temperature, space expanded, the universe cooled, and the simplest elements formed. Gravity gradually drew matter together to form the first stars and the first galaxies. Galaxies collected into groups, clusters, and superclusters. Some stars died in supernova explosions, whose chemical remnants seeded new generations of stars and enabled the formation of rocky planets. On at least one such planet, life evolved to consciousness. And it wonders, “Where did I come from?”

Learn more on the Rose Center for Earth and Space website

Why Teen-agers Are the Worst

Every adult has gone through adolescence, and studies have shown that if you ask people to look back on their lives they will disproportionately recall experiences they had between the ages of ten and twenty-five. (This phenomenon is called the “reminiscence bump.”) And yet, to adults, the adolescent mind is a mystery—a Brigadoon-like place that’s at once vivid and inaccessible. Why would anyone volunteer to down fifteen beers in a row? Under what circumstances could Edward Fortyhands, an activity that involves having two forty-ounce bottles of malt liquor affixed to your hands with duct tape, be construed as enjoyable? And what goes for drinking games also goes for hooking up with strangers, jumping from high places into shallow pools, and steering a car with your knees. At moments of extreme exasperation, parents may think that there’s something wrong with their teen-agers’ brains. Which, according to recent books on adolescence, there is.

Scientists are gaining new insights into the irrational brains of adolescents. Elizabeth Kolbert explores in this week’s issue.

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Moon Jellyfish

These alien-looking creatures are named for their translucent, moonlike circular bells. Instead of long, trailing tentacles, moon jellies have a short, fine fringe that sweeps food toward the mucous layer on the edges of the bells. Prey is stored in pouches until the oral arms pick it up and begin to digest it.

The coloration of a moon jelly often changes depending on its diet. If the jelly feeds extensively on crustaceans, it turns pink or lavender. An orange tint hints that a jelly’s been feeding on brine shrimp.

Scientists have studied the life cycle of this jelly extensively. They know the adult male moon jelly releases strands of sperm, which are ingested by female moon jellies. 

Found worldwide in temperate and tropical waters, moon jellies feed in quiet bays and harbors. Although moon jellies have a sting, they pose little threat to humans. (Source)