Reformatting

@dilutedaspirations

It took a while for Futurekat to track down Opal. Having appeared in a way less convenient location than he would’ve preferred, he spent the last several moments wandering around the massive, snaking hallways of the horrorterror’s estate, starting to wonder if the real worst case scenario wasn’t so much as ending up on the floor convulsing, but running himself mad as he walked circle after circle in foreign territory. Luckily, it’d all worked out. One could only open so many doors before locating the correct one.

“Before you think I’m an axe murderer and smash a pot over my head, I’m Futurekat,” he quickly recites as he enters the room. Better safe than sorry. Amnesiacs were incredibly unpredictable when they had nothing to trust. “Maybe when you remember everything, you should consider reformatting this place. Like, I get it’s big. You’re big and tentacle-y when you want to be, so maybe it’s to accommodate your size. But how many rooms does a deity need? Why all the storage space?”

it’s midnight and all i’ve done today is clean my house, put back everything the renovators moved, reformatted/added to my resume, and applied to two jobs….being productive is exhausting TT i’m gonna go watch flower boys next door and eat chicken nuggets

Re: Sick and tired of hearing “source?” or having to explain white privilege and systemic racism? [reformatted]

Hello all! This is a reformatted version of this post originally compiled by randymusprime​.

On Preparing for Arguments…
Identifying and Avoiding Logical Fallacies

On White Privilege & Systemic Racism…
7 Facts That Prove White Privilege Exists
On Racism and White Privilege
The New Jim Crow
Where White Privilege Came From
White Privilege from Taking Action Against Racism
Denying White Privilege
White Privilege: An Insidious Virus
1 in 3 Black Males Will Go to Prison in Their Lifetime
What is a ‘System of Privilege’?
White Privilege 101
Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack
14 Examples of Systemic Racism in the US Criminal Justice System
Black Student Graduation Rates
Young Black Men and Gun Violence
Operation Ghetto Storm
Top 10 Most Startling Facts About People of Color in the US
Racial Profiling in Vermont
DoJ Stats Show Clear Pattern of Racial Profiling
OK, fine. Let’s talk about ‘black-on-black’ violence.
Why Police So Often See Unarmed Black Men as Threats

On the Difference Between Racism and Prejudice…
Toward an Understanding of Prejudice and Racism
Ferguson Cops More Inept Than Strategic
10 Simple Ways White People Can Fight Everyday Racism
Ferguson’s Massive Cover-Up
How Moral Leaders like MLK Approach Neutrality
Why It’s So Hard for Victims to See Justice
America’s Stop-And-Frisk Policies Proof of Racism
Examples of Institutional Racism in the US

On Why White People/Americans Are Afraid to Admit Racism Exists…
The Racism That Still Plagues America
Why We’re Still Unwilling to Admit to Systemic Racism in America
Why American Racism is Impossible to Defeat

On Reverse Racism…
A Look at the Myth of Reverse Racism
Why Reverse Racism Isn’t Real
Why There’s No Such Thing as ‘Reverse Racism’

Enjoy my lovelies, and feel free to add to this post or to the original!

- Mod D

4

PEP (Persons of Exceptional Prominence) Spot Light:  Lieutenant (JG) Harriet Pickens (1909-1969) & Ensign Frances Wills (1916-1998)

In honor of African American Women’s History Month, we are highlighting the first two African American women who were commissioned as officers in the US Navy.  Lieutenant Pickens and Ensign Wills were commissioned in the United States Navy on December 21, 1944.

Lieutenant Harriet Pickens, a public health administrator with a master’s degree in Political Science from Columbia University, was the daughter of William Pickens, one of the founders of the NAACP.  Prior to her military service, Harriet was the Executive Secretary of the Harlem Tuberculosis and Health Committee of the New York Tuberculosis and Health Association.  In addition to this position, she was a supervisor of recreation programs in the New Deal’s WPA (Works Project Administration). 

Ensign Frances Wills was a native of Philadelphia and graduate of Hunter College.  While Frances pursued her MA in Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh, she worked with famed African American poet, Langston Hughes.  She worked in an adoption agency, placing children in adoptive homes.   Her experiences as a pioneering naval officer led Frances to eventually write the book Navy Blue and Other Colors under her married name, Frances Wills Thorpe.

Obviously, these were two accomplished and well educated women, highly qualified to serve their country as military officers in time of war.  It was only their race that stood in their way and the remarkable pair would help to tear that barrier down.  They were sworn in as apprentice seamen in the US Navy in November 1944. 

After receiving their commissions a month later, both Harriet and Frances serviced at the Hunter Naval Training Station in Bronx, NY, the main training facility for enlisted WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) recruits.  Harriet Pickens led physical training sessions up until her death in 1969 at the age of 60.  Frances Wills taught naval history and administered classification tests.  She died in 1998.

Lieutenant Pickens’ and Ensign Wills’ military files are two of the records in our PEPs (Persons of Exceptional Prominence) collection at the National Archives at St. Louis. Due to the high volume of attention and research on their military career, Lieutenant Pickens and Ensign Wills’ record was placed in the PEP collection and digitally copied. The Preservation Programs at St. Louis treats and stabilizes PEP records by placing the documents in polyester film sleeves, removing fasteners and staples and undertaking any required repair actions that will extend the life of the documents. An entire record is then scanned and placed on DVDs so researchers can access exact replicas, thus preventing damage to the original documents.

We are proud to highlight the lives and achievements of these two courageous women who in the face of segregation and hatred overcame and changed the face of the United States Navy forever.

Know What You Have Done

Requested by @glithch

This is neither a curse, nor a hex, as it does not return the pain caused (though it can easily be reformatted to do so), but simply makes the aggressor aware of it. More than that, it is to force them to understand the pain caused. Do not be wary of its simplicity, for its effects are tried and true.

Gather

  • A large bowl – the darker in color the better **
  • Water **
  • (Optional, though highly recommended): a personal affect of your aggressor)
  • (Optional: a Candle, black or white)

** Alternately, you can replace the bowl and water for a mirror or other scrying surface of your choosing

Instructions

  1. Take with you your items to a dark room. Light the candle (or another dull light source) and pour your water into the bowl. The goal is to arrange it so that you cannot see through the water, but can only see the reflection on its surface.
  2. When you have found the perfect lighting, take the personal affect in your left hand and “find” them in the water. You want to use the affect to attune to their spirit/energy so that you can “see” them. Keep working until you have a definitive link. You will know it when you have it.
  3. Once the link has been made, using your right hand, dip your fingers into the water (hence why the bowl of water is preferred)  – this represents their subconsciousness. Bring forth the incident in which you were wrong and “place alongside” it, your own pain. Not in such a way as to inflict the pain, but to make them aware of your own. If you find it easier, feel free to speak what they have done aloud and the results of their actions. “This is what you have done.”
  4. When you have said your peace and shown them what they need to see, break the link by flicking the water from your fingers onto the surface and releasing the personal affect from your hand. Pour out the water wherever convenient and do with the personal affect whatever you feel is appropriate. There is no need to destroy or get rid of it – in fact, you may wish to hold onto it for any further work.

photo source

I want to be loved.
But I also really want to love someone.
I imagine, that there is no greater feeling than knowing that there is someone who looks forward to you everyday.
I want to give someone that “We will survive together” kind of love.
That “I’ll make sure you smile despite life’s horrible weather” kind of love.
That “I will never leave and I mean that” kind of love.
That “Forget your old relationships I’m here to reformat” kind of love.
I want to exchange hearts for Christmas.
I want to kiss someone until we’re both breathless.
I want to be someone’s 4am phone call when life makes them restless.
And love, has a tendency to leave me perplexed.
Even now, it’s hard to figure out what to write next.
But I know that I want to love someone.
I just hope that the one I love and the one that breaks my heart don’t have the same address.
2

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Selective Service System Draft Registration Card

The National Archives at St. Louis is home to millions of selective service system draft registration cards for men born prior to March 29, 1957.  In 2012, selective service registration cards were transferred to St. Louis from other NARA sites around the country.  The Reformatting Unit of the Preservation Programs at St. Louis recently stabilized, organized, and   re-produced digital copies of 17 boxes of these records which will available for public access.  During the project, Martin Luther King, Jr’s selective service card was located and scanned for public viewing.  Selective service registration cards can be viewed by the public and contains a great source of information for family history, genealogy, and scholarly research.

5

I’m selling all my ASOIAF pieces as prints at the Ltd Art Gallery “WINTER IS COMING” show! They are all available online as easily frameable 8x10 giclee prints on watercolor paper for $20 each, should you like to buy one. They’re each limited to only 25 prints, too!

In the past I haven’t offered all of these for sale as prints because the original files were kinda small, but I went back in and reformatted, tweaked colors, and cleaned everything up.

After the show is over I will likely offer these as 12x15 or 12x18 prints in my inprnt store, but if you want an 8x10 THEN NOW IS THE TIME!

3

Voices From Beyond
Some call it a spirit board. Some call it a talking board. It is used to commune with something from another place…

Like what you read? Visit Nerd Rage for more! New comics every Friday! And don’t forget to like Nerd Rage on Facebook and follow me on Twitter.

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This comic has been reformatted to fit Tumblr’s narrow image restrictions.  The original version and more are viewable on my website! 

youtube

Ever wonder what the Preservation Programs at St. Louis does?…Watch this!!!

PEP (Person of Exceptional Prominence) Spot Light:  Cpt. Mary T. Klinker (October 3, 1947 – April 4, 1975)

Mary Klinker served in the Air Force as a flight nurse, instructor, and flight examiner from 1969 to 1975.

In 1974, the Vietnam War was ending and in an act of pure humanity, President Gerald Ford announced a mission that would be known as “Operation Babylift.” This mission’s purpose was to evacuate more than 2000 orphaned children from Saigon. Capt. Mary T. Klinker was enlisted as a flight nurse responsible for caring for the children during their transport to the Philippines.

Unfortunately, on April 4, 1975, the inaugural Operation Babylift flight ended in tragedy crashing within minutes of takeoff killing 138 of the 314 on board.  The flight crew, caregivers, and infants died in the Operation Babylift plane crash including Capt. Mary T. Klinker.

Capt. Klinker was 27-years-old when she died and was the last nurse and only member of the US Air Force Nurse Corps to be killed in Vietnam. She was posthumously awarded the Airman’s Medal for Heroism and the Meritorious Service Medal.

Capt. Klinker’s military file is one of the records in our PEPs (Persons of Exceptional Prominence) collection at the National Archives at St. Louis. Due to the high volume of attention and research on her military career, Cpt. Klinker’s record was placed in the PEP collection and digitally copied. The Preservation Programs at St. Louis treats and stabilizes PEP records by placing the documents in polyester film sleeves, removing fasteners and staples and undertaking any required repair actions that will extend the life of the documents. An entire record is then scanned and placed on DVDs so researchers can access exact replicas, thus preventing damage to the original documents.

As we continue to protect and preserve these important military records, it reminds us that Memorial Day is not just the “beginning of the summer holiday season”, but  a time to reflect on the lives of men and woman of our armed forces who willingly gave up their lives for our freedom and the freedom of others around the world.

6

My favorite “cute” Minho photos for sakurazukaredocean​ 

3

Breeding Incense
Pokemon breeding, baby pokemon…suddenly things are falling into place.

Like what you read? Visit Nerd Rage for more! New comics every Friday! And don’t forget to like Nerd Rage on Facebook and follow me on Twitter.

——
This comic has been reformatted to fit Tumblr’s narrow image restrictions.  The original version and more are viewable on my website!