Randall-Munroe

For starters, would your soul mate even still be alive? A hundred billion or so humans have ever lived, but only seven billion are alive now (which gives the human condition a 93 percent mortality rate). If we were all paired up at random, 90 percent of our soul mates would be long dead…

A world of random soul mates would be a lonely one. Let’s hope that’s not what we live in.

anonymous asked:

I feel like every cool kid is intj and i'm intp.... can you please list some cool people that are intp ?

You
Einstein
Tina Fey
Darwin
Abraham Lincoln
Jane Austen
Sigourney Weaver
Whatshisface the guy who came up with
Wikipedia
My gal Marie Curie

(Also gonna add Socrates, Data from STNG, Carl Jung, Thucydides, Gandalf, and apparently Yoda)
Which of the following would be brighter in terms of the amount of energy delivered to your retina: a supernova seen from as far away as the sun is from the earth [93,000,000 miles] or the detonation of a hydrogen bomb pressed against your eyeball?  Answer: The supernova is brighter. By nine orders of magnitude. Supernovae are unimaginably huge.
—  Randall Munroe, creator of xkcd
Take wrong turns. Talk to strangers. Open unmarked doors. And if you see a group of people in a field, go find out what they are doing. Do things without always knowing how they’ll turn out. You’re curious and smart and bored, and all you see is the choice between working hard and slacking off. There are so many adventures that you miss because you’re waiting to think of a plan. To find them, look for tiny interesting choices. And remember that you are always making up the future as you go.
—  Randall Munroe
Take wrong turns. Talk to strangers. Open unmarked doors. And if you see a group of people in a field, go find out what they are doing. Do things without always knowing how they’ll turn out. You’re curious and smart and bored, and all you see is the choice between working hard and slacking off. There are so many adventures that you miss because you’re waiting to think of a plan. To find them, look for tiny interesting choices. And remember that you are always making up the future as you go.
—  Randall Munroe
My all-time favorite example of syntactic ambiguity comes from Wikipedia: “Charlotte’s Web is a children’s novel by American Author E.B. White, about a pig named Wilbur who is saved from being slaughtered by an intelligent spider named Charlotte.”
—  Randall Munroe