Ramiken-Crucible

Continues thru Dec 23:

 Lucas Blalock
XYZ

Ramiken Crucible, 389 Grand St., NYC
Wednesday - Sunday, 12 - 6pm

Blalock enthusiastically deploys any method that can be used to construct a picture, provided it is contained within the procedural program of photography. Each picture begins on film, shot with a 4x5 camera by the artist; digital interventions follow. Blalock leaves his pictures unprotected from these overlapping strategies, which often contain overly elaborated procedures lifted from the technical production of commercial photography. Patterns merge and mutate, inflected by color corrections that do not correct and masks that do not fit.

Opens Tonight, Jan 20, 6-8p:

 Nolan Hendrickson
NEW NEW FACE

Ramiken Crucible, 389 Grand St., NYC

“Many approach ‘inferior’ minority groups with the normalizing trope 'we’re just like you.’ Hendrickson’s work says something similar yet opposite: 'we’re all a bunch of freaks.’ In his shocking paintings, race and gender are mixed and matched as if in a very dirty flip book.” -Huffington Post

What I Am Up To (reviewing Lucas Blalock at Ramiken Crucible on Searching For The Light “I might have officially become old. I don’t get the Lucas Blalock. I know the kids (and The New York Times) like him, but I am really at a loss for what is going in his show. There is a string of rather underwhelming and awkward still-lifes, pictures with intentionally sloppy photoshop work and a picture behind a fake wall that is only visible through the front window. …Maybe the intentionally bad photoshop pushes the limits of what an art photograph can be and highlights the now hackneyed point that photographs are always a construction (be it technical or cultural). When you come down to it, none of Blalock’s pictures are terrible engaging. They’re often just clunky and ill-formed. Now is this some attempt to challenge an older generation of art fans? Or is this a less skilled extension of a line of thought that Ethridge started almost a decade ago?”)

(via Searching for the Light: Lucas Blalock, Id, Ed, Ad, Od, @ Ramiken Crucible)

Catharine Ahearn
empire of women, 2014
linen, gouache, spray paint, plexi
154 cm x 103 cm x 5 cm (60-5/8” x 40-9/16” x 1-15/16”)
No. L01610
Courtesy the artist and Ramiken Crucible, New York

Catharine Ahearn
empire of women, 2014
linen, gouache, spray paint, plexi
154 cm x 103 cm x 5 cm (60-5/8” x 40-9/16” x 1-15/16”)
No. L01609
Courtesy the artist and Ramiken Crucible, New York

EVERYTHING FALLS FASTER THAN AN ANVIL

Curated by CHEWDAY’S


May 9 - Jun 18, 2014
Pace London, Lexington Street

FEATURED ARTIST: Andra Ursuta’s work combines references to the traditional folklore of her native Romania with an investigation of feminine identity through a series of sculptures, installations and immersive environments. Ursuta recently had a solo exhibition at Venus Over Manhattan and her work is currently on display at the Venice Biennale.

Andra Ursuta, A Worm’s Dream Home, 2012. Concrete. 20" x 15" x 10". Courtesy of the artist, Ramiken Crucible and François Ghebaly Gallery. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer. http://sculpture-center.tumblr.com/

Opening Tomorrow, Nov 7, 6-8p:

klaer, uglee callamari
 Esther Kläs, Ugo Rondinone, Matteo Callegari

Ramiken Crucible, 389 Grand St., NYC (at Norfolk)

“Ugo Rondinone seems like a good fit for a group show with Esther Kläs and Matteo Callegari. Rondinone’s arguably one of the fathers of the life-affirming magical realism genre (which is a thing). Some of the more primitive-style sculpture seems to worship nature and light; others, like his famed "HELL, YES!” sign from the New Museum’s facade, seem just to say “Hallelujah!” to no one in particular. Similarly, Esther Kläs’s sculpture has been described as “monolithic,” and Matteo Callegari’s abstract painting has a raw, process-based feel.“
- The L Magazine