RHS Wisley

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Plant of the Day

Saturday 13 June 2015

Gazania linearis (treasure flower) was introduced to cultivation in England in the 19th century and was mentioned in the Gardeners’ Chronicle in 1883 (as Gazania longiscapa). It is native to South Africa in areas of summer rainfall and here has been grown from seed in a layer of coarse sand and grit at RHS Wisley Garden, UK, as part of the on-going research work by Dr James Hitchmough into more pictorial displays in landscapes using annuals and herbaceous perennials often as meadow-like features. The plant needs sunny, free draining conditions with moisture in the summer.

Jill Raggett

Plant of the Day
Saturday 14 June 2014

A dark corner of the woodland garden at RHS Wisley was being brightened by the white flowers of Thalictrum aquilegiifolium var. sibiricum. This tall (1.5 m) herbaceous plant crowns itself with these masses of feathery white flowers. The leaves resemble those of Aquilegia (columbine) so giving the plant it’s specific name. It is native to northeastern China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, and Siberia in Russia.

Jill Raggett

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Plant of the Day

Monday 15 June 2015

The large dramatic flowers and flower buds of Baptisia alba var. macrophylla (white false indigo) growing in the Piet Oudolf herbaceous borders at RHS Wisley Garden, London. A tall, clump forming, long lived plant tolerant of poor well drained soils. This grey flushed glaucous foliaged perennial is originally from the North American prairies.

Jill Raggett

Plant of the Day
Friday 13 June 2014

The flower of Liriodendron tulipifera, the tulip tree. A vigorous deciduous tree with attractively lobed leaves which turn butter yellow in the autumn. Ideal as a specimen tree on a lawn it will reach over 12 m in height and 8 m in width. This great plant was next to the restaurant terrace at RHS Wisley Gardens, Surrey. We had a great visit with our Korean students on the English Garden Design Summer School, but today it is back to the classroom for garden history!

Jill Raggett