Queer-Theatre

No, but guys.  Fun Home took Best Musical.  Hedwig took Best Revival last year.  Two years in a row, two shamelessly, explicitly queer stories - BOTH WHICH ARE ABOUT ACCEPTING YOURSELF AS YOU ARE EVEN IF YOU FUCK UP ALONG THE WAY - have taken top prize in their category, with their lead actors from both winning Best Actor for their performances.

THIS IS SO IMPORTANT.  

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What is that you say a musical where the lead is a lesbian? Why yes it is!

The stage production is based off of “Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic” Alison Bechdel’s graphic memoir.

In this video young Alison is singing “Ring of Keys” a song all about her feelings for a woman. 

Love is - something I know. I don’t know how we got here, I don’t know why touching you makes me so happy, but I know - that seeing you, or even thinking about seeing you, makes me feel like - I don’t need to know anything else.
—  The Most Fabulous Story Ever Told
If you’re LGBTQ+ and involved in theatre, I need your help!

So, I’m writing an essay on LGBTQ+ people in theatre, and if any of you would be willing to be “interviewed” (by which I mean answering some very open-ended questions about your experiences and opinions and all that), it would mean the world! 

If this doesn’t apply to you, but you know someone you think would be interested, then please pass it on! 

Thank you!

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First produced at The Flea in 2011, She Kills Monsters by Qui Nguyen is an action packed play featuring three-headed monsters and gelatinous cubes. I have seen this play twice and I cried at both productions from laughter and big gay feelings. 

She Kills Monsters is a play about an older sister named Agnes who tries to connect with her deceased little sister, Tilly, by navigating through her younger sister’s homespun Dungeons and Dragons module. Despite being sisters, Agnes and Tilly were very different people. Through playing the game, Agnes realizes that she did not really know her sister at all. Now immersed in her sister’s imagination and equipped with a sword, Agnes becomes Agnes The Ass-Hatted and learns more about her sister than she could have ever imagined. In Tilly’s ideal world within Dungeons and Dragons, everyone is gay. 

Winner in 2013 of the Distinguished Play Award from the American Alliance for Theatre and Education (AATE) and nominated in 2012 for a GLAAD award. It features heroes of varying abilities. If it’s playing near you, see it. It’s a fun time.

If you happen to be a Texan, University of Houston is producing this play in late April. 

Purchase here: 

http://www.samuelfrench.com/p/8807/she-kills-monsters

[Fiona] Shaw’s performance as Richard played with both masculinity and femininity to create a multilayered impression of the character; yet she posed a particular challenge to the construction of maleness. When women perform masculinity, they reveal it to be artificial rather than immanent, which violates the dominant conception of masculinity in Western culture as not a construction, but rather “the thing itself." This nonperformative characterization of masculinity makes it difficult for women to embody. Those, like Shaw, who do embody it through cross-gender performance violate a cultural taboo: they show that masculinity is not the exclusive property of biologically male bodies. By highlighting the instability of masculinity, Shaw problematized the cultural myth that sex, defined as the biological differences between males and females, dictates gender, which refers to the cultural meanings that are assigned to sexed bodies. Her performance also revealed the subversive potential
of the "female androgyne” (to appropriate George Piggford’s term) to unsettle the gender binary. Her androgynous Richard disrupted both masculinity and femininity through her continually shifting portrayal.
—  (p. 179) “Many Bodies, Many Voices: Performing Androgyny in Fiona Shaw and Deborah Warner’s ‘Richard II’” by Elizabeth Klett
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Transgender Play Database

Finding new plays can be really hard, especially if you have very specific parameters (like “transgender characters” for example). So, we’ve made a crowdsourced google database that will, with your help, be a resource for anyone looking for plays with trans or non binary characters or plays written by authors with those identities. 

Add a play to the database here.

View the database here.

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hey everybody!! i’m pleased to finally tell you that a play i wrote, xe, about non-binary individuals trying to survive in british society, made it to the shortlist of a national theatre competition, and will therefore be performed as a rehearsed reading at the shed, the national theatre’s temporary venue, on tuesday 8th july

if you’re free, you’re welcome to come along, it’d be great to see some of you there

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                                        STOP KISS by Diana Son!

THE STORY: "A poignant and funny play about the ways, both sudden and slow, that lives can change irrevocably,“ says Variety. After Callie meets Sara, the two unexpectedly fall in love. Their first kiss provokes a violent attack that transforms their lives in a way they could never anticipate. (Dramatists Play Service)

"Something as thought provoking and ultimately moving as STOP KISS is a joy to experience.” —Star Ledger.

This play is the next topic of discussion for our Queer Theatre Book Club! It has been recommended and suggested to me many times and I’m excited to read it with all of you! 

The date for this month’s discussion is February 15th, 2015 via Tinychat.

This is a really laid back book club. We have people from every academic (or post) level! Come on! Grab a script and get reading!

Here are some resources to buy the script:

Amazon:                                                                          http://www.amazon.com/Stop-Kiss-Edition-Diana-Son/dp/0822217317

Dramatists Play Service:                                         http://www.dramatists.com/cgi-bin/db/single.asp?key=2871

See y'all then! If you have any questions let me know!

timeout.com
A trans theater festival is coming to Williamsburg
Williamsburg’s most daring theater venue just announced its Trans Theatre Festival, which runs June 7-26.

“Recognizing trans artists as an invaluable part of our arts community, both currently and historically, this festival is part of an ongoing commitment to elevating their work,” the Brick folks say. “We’re proud to present a theater and arts festival curated by and featuring the work of trans artists. Featuring theater, dance, film, web series, visual art, educational programming and a panel discussion on trans issues in the indie theater scene.”

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“Blanche DuBois would have died.” - Time Out New York (Editor’s Pick)

“Fruitie” Audience Choice Award for Best Off-Broadway Performance

“Debutante Balls” is a theatrical stand-up comedy dance through the fascinating culture of the Southern Debutante Ball. Scott TurnerSchofield’s wicked sense of self-aware humor and poetic sensibility guide us gently (or is that genteel-ly?) through the many ways he “came out” into Southern Society (as a lesbian, radical feminist, and finally, as a transgender man), poking fun at gender roles and sniffing the vapors of nostalgia gone-with-the-wind in these modern times. Applauded by Judith (Jack) Halberstam and the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity alike, this is a generous, insightful, not-to-be-missed solo show.

Three Gala Balls, Two Southern Towns, One Leopard Print Dress.
Do YOU have the balls to be a Debutante?

On Anthony Rapp's new musical If/Then:

One of the complexities of Rapp’s character is his fluid sexuality. In one timeline, he pines after Beth, but in the other, he finds himself in a relationship with a handsome doctor named David, played by Jason Tam. Despite the fact that Elizabeth proclaims her distrust of bisexuality, If/Then is fully invested in the idea of sexuality as a spectrum. In addition to Lucas, there’s Elizabeth’s friend Kate (LaChanze), a lesbian kindergarten teacher. The fact that sexual identity is both central and incidental is part of what makes If/Then feel thoroughly modern — it’s a significant step forward for the queer musical, which had its groundwork laid, largely in part, by Rent.

“Like in Rent, the queer characters are just gay or lesbian or bisexual, whatever they are,” Rapp says. “Their sexuality’s not an issue per se. So in that sense, it’s very sort of post-gay, post-identity … Of course, there still need to be stories told.Brokeback Mountain was a profoundly important story to be told about a person in the closet, and I’m sure there are other stories like that. But more and more, I hope there can also just be, We’re all in this together, like my character says, and it doesn’t have to be about the issue itself of whether someone’s gay or straight.”

For Rapp, who identifies as a “four-and-a-half” on the Kinsey scale, If/Then’s intrinsic queerness is a major asset.

“I’ve always liked the word ‘queer,’” he says. “It’s the umbrella word, and I like that it’s the reclaiming of an insult and all of that. I do like, also, the other meaning of ‘queer,’ which is other, different, weird. Because people of divergent sexualities are a little weird, and I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that.”

Hey, NY actors! Please consider auditioning for this supernatural, gay new play by Steven Glavey. It’s the senior directing project of our good friend and Spectral Citadel collaborator, Matthew DeCostanza. This IS a student production, but we are working really hard to get a decent budget, tour with it, and submit it to festivals. Steven, Matt, and I are serious about continuing our work together as an experimental theater and film group, and we hope our excitment for this project is contagious and attracts like-minded weirdos and future collaborators.


Plus, if you’re cast, you get to wear costumes and interact with puppets by me!

I don’t want to reveal too much about the plot, but it involves a lesbian werewolf and a spooky castle. Our influences for this project include,but are not limited to, grand guignol theatre, German Expressionism, lesbian vampire movies, Angela Carter, The Duchess of Malfi,and the Vincent Price/Roger Corman Poe movies.

If you’re interested in auditioning but don’t have facebook, email the stage manager at wolvessm2015@gmail.com. thanks!
‘Dear Mr. Charles, Do you enjoy gay theater?’ I am gay theater. All right, I will now give you the entire history of American gay theater, in sixty seconds. Go!
      (MR. CHARLES stands, and there is a dramatic lighting change, as he free-associates rapidly.)
'Jimmy isn’t like the other boys-do you know what you are-he’s no son of mine! I’m just so lonely and sick of my own evil.-he was a boy, just a boy-Bill was my buddy, and our love was pure and strong, but those things they’re saying- they’re true, about me! I’m so sick and ashamed, Karen! Do you know what you are? I am a thirty-two-year-old, pockmarked Jew fairy, and that was when my father saw me backstage, in my wig and my tights, and he said, take care of my son.             (Singing)
I am what I am!
       (in a gravelly voice, as Harvey Fierstein)
I just wanna be loved, Is that so wrong? But Doctor, what’s wrong with David, with all the Davids? Our people are dying, and the Mayor still won’t say the name of the disease- Maria Callas!
        (He raises his arms as graceful as wings)
Let the great work begin!
        (He raises his arms again)
Let the great work begin, part two! When you speak of gay theater, and you will-be kind. Because it’s all about love, valour, and gratuitous frontal male nudity!
— 

Mr. Charles, Currently of Palm Beach by Paul Rudnick

(How many shows can you identify in this?)

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 A Singular They

“Aliza Goldstein’s arresting serio-comic study of an intersex teen in Allentown, Penn., is about as timely as a play can be in an era when bullying and bathroom ordinances are so much a part of our conversations. It’s a remarkable piece of writing to boot.

Focusing on three characters within a taut 80-minute running time, playwright Goldstein dives right in. In a biology class make-up period overseen by empathetic teacher Mr. Mazer (Nick Ballard), unwed mother-to-be Dierdre (Hannah Prichard) trades jovially sardonic repartee with best friend Burbank (Lily Nicksay), born with an “ambiguous genitalia situation.””

Reviews: (LA Times) (Stage Raw)