We are weird, guys

So in my job as a freelance writer I’ve been approached by small-time publishers to write for the erotica market, since everyone thinks that there’s a ton of money to be made in Kindle singles. First of all, there isn’t a ton of money to be made - the stories have a VERY low price point and most of them are not bestsellers. Even if I could write erotica, it wouldn’t be worthwhile.

Second, and this is the weird part, almost all of the stories they want me to write involve an “alpha male” more or less forcing himself on a woman, usually in an office setting, which as of late is a whole new level of creepy and weird, especially because the employers are, themselves, women. I don’t really know what to make of it.

@amytipton

Quick question for you all:

Last year I wrote a feature-length lesbian screenplay which incorporates many subtextual themes much like you’d find in BBC Sherlock. It’s about a closeted college dropout finding her 15 seconds of internet fame after her small role in an independent film went viral and it follows her struggle to gain more work in the Hollywood film industry afterwards. Expected to fit Hollywood’s normal role for a woman, she’s careful not to out herself in the process, but selling her soul becomes exceptionally difficult after she’s hired to work alongside a beautiful bisexual choreographer. My screenplay “Set the Record Straight” includes a fresh perspective of compulsory heterosexuality and the blurred line between female romance and friendship.

No death, no rape, only pining and happy endings. 

Would any of you read it if I published it to Amazon?

Image: Cover of America #2, starring America Chavez, Marvel’s lesbian Latina superhero. (Marvel Comics)

NPR’s Glen Weldon is used to comics shop chatter that revolves around things like which new books are worth checking out, what storylines have gone way too long and which hero could kick which other hero’s butt. Generally speaking, the word “demographics” doesn’t crop up a lot; but it did last week, after a Marvel executive’s comments about diversity in comics unleashed an online firestorm.

Beyond The Pale (Male): Marvel, Diversity And A Changing Comics Readership

anonymous asked:

What does it take to get published by a big company like you guys?

To be honest: A LOT of hard work and determination. There are many steps between an author finishing a first draft of a book and seeing it published on bookshelves. Here are a few of the general publishing guidelines/steps!

Step 1. Find an agent. 

Literary agents are the first step once you’ve edited and revised your manuscript a few times. You should have a pretty polished book before you even send out queries. For more info on what a query should look like and tips for writing one, check out this link. Hopefully, this will then lead you to signing on with an agent!

Step 2. Your agents will shop your book around. 

Your agent will then send out your manuscript to various editors, who will either express interest or pass it over. If many editors from various Publishing Houses or Imprints like your book, then they will offer bids, or even take your book to auction. In the end, someone will agree to publish you, and your agent will help you to decide who is the best fit for you and your book. 

Step 3. You work with an Editor.

Once you find out where your book will be published, you work with an editor to help put those last touches on your book. This can often take a while, so even if your book is acquired in January, it might not be ready to be published for another two years or so! (Publishing is a SLOW business, y’all.)

Step 4. You get a release date!

This is when the marketing team will come in and start dreaming of all the fun exciting ways to let the world know about your book! Will there be a live chat? A goodreads giveaway? A tumblr post? Something more? Publicity builds buzz around either you or your book, or both, and hopefully readers are pumped up for your novel! All this happens in the build up to your release day. 

Step 5. Your book is born. 

Happy birthday! After a long process, your story is now out in the world! To help promote your book you might go on tour, or maybe you write guest blog posts or do a giveaway. Hopefully your book is beloved by fans and then you can sit back and relax… oh wait, I mean you can keep writing the sequel your publisher begged you to write!

Be warned, this is all best case scenarios, and every author has a unique journey through the world of publishing, often dependent on genre or publisher, or agent, or book. Many people have to face rejection after rejection after rejection before any of this happens. But hopefully this little guide is a helpful start as you start exploring this beautiful bookish world! 

Image: Courtesy of The Family of Judith Jones/Knopf

Judith Jones may not have been a household name, but without her, some of the world’s most famous books may never have been published.

In 1950, Jones was working as an editorial assistant at Doubleday Publishing when she stumbled upon a book in the discard pile that she couldn’t put down. She was struck by the face on the cover: Anne Frank.

“I read all afternoon with the tears coming down my face,” Jones told NPR in 1998. “When my boss got back, it was evening by then. He said, ‘What are you doing still here?’ And I said, 'We have to have this book!’ And he said, 'What? That book by that kid?’”

The book by that kid became The Diary of Anne Frank. It had already been released in German and Dutch, but Jones convinced her bosses to publish it in the United States, vastly expanding its readership. It went on to sell more than 30 million copies worldwide in more than 60 languages.

Jones died Wednesday at her home in Vermont. She was 93.

Legendary Editor Judith Jones Dies At 93

I’ve read Edgar Allan Poe. I’ve read H.P Lovecraft. I’ve read Stephen King. But I can truly say: Trump’s Twitter feed is the scariest thing I’ve ever read in my life.

When you realize a literal mad man has nuke codes and is in charge of the biggest military in the world..

Ain’t no haunted hotel can compete with that shit.

neverlandtm  asked:

This may be a weird question but do you think someone white would be taken more seriously when writing different races and ethnicities if they kept their identity anonymous? I've been writing a book for that is full of different races and ethnic groups. I gave it to an editor & the first thing he said was "way to really reach the diversity quota here, you'll get more readers with this." This hurt. I truly love my characters. I don't want them seen as just a ploy or a bating tactic.

White Privilege, Publishing, and Diversity Quotas

As in most cases, white privilege works in the white author’s favor. More likely to be published in the first place (with or without a diverse cast), more likely to be praised for being inclusive, as seen here, basically the things Writers of Color are accused of and struggle with happen less, if at all, to white authors.

Your editor seeing you as reaching a diversity quota is their flaw, not necessarily that of your writing. Thinking of diversity in terms of quotas is going about it wrong, in my opinion. It’s interesting that your editor does recognize that diversity sells and is seeing the dollar signs, thus “you’ll get more readers for this” but hey. 

Do not write in a way that is a ploy or a bating tactic and you will be fine. 

That is, don’t do any of the following:

  • Write PoC in solely to get more readers, money, pats on the back etc.
  • Under develop your Characters of Color and/or lazily rely on stereotypes
  • Consciously include “just enough PoC” to fit a mental or real diversity quota
  • Feature them at the beginning only to sideline, underplay, or kill them off later.

However, do do the following:

  • Write PoC because being inclusive is important, you want to represent the real world, give people reflections, etc
  • Fully develop your Characters of Color, be mindful of stereotypes and learn how to subvert and avoid them
  • Not concern yourself with quotas but instead just keep in mind your goals for an inclusive cast if it’s not something you do naturally (yet). No magical number required.
  • Allow Characters of Color to live to see happiness. In a world where the “Black person dies first”, it’s rule-breaking to see PoC live sometimes.

There’s always going to be people who see inclusive writing as an attempt to reach a quota, whether that’s viewed negatively or positively. There is no quota! And no need to have to defend your choices as if white people are the only ones who should exist in stories unless it’s some book about a certain group or “the struggle.” As if a cast of all white people is ever scrutinized so closely.

Forget that noise and just write.

~ Colette

(Photo: Jonathan Ernst/ For The Washington Post)

Without Judith Jones, the world may never have known about the life of Anne Frank or the cuisine of Julia Child. 

The legendary editor rescued Frank’s personal journal from a publisher’s reject pile and introduced her first-person account of the Holocaust as “The Diary of a Young Girl.” 

She also spent months trying Child’s recipes that filled the pages of “Mastering the Art of French Cooking.” 

Jones died today at her summer home in Walden, Vermont. She was 93.

Read more here: Judith Jones, cookbook editor who brought Julia Child and others to the table, dies at 93

When is writing advice worth following?

I’m a big fan of taking all ‘writing rules’ with a grain of salt. But when are they truly worth listening to, and when will they only slow you down?

Four key things to consider when judging writing advice:

(1) Every reader enjoys something different. There is no perfect way to write, because all readers favors different types of characters, different story lines, different forms of prose, different genres, different books. If you have a story, there is someone out there who will enjoy it, no matter how many ‘writing rules’ it breaks.

(2) Rules on how to write prose are not quite the same as rules on how to write a story. Prose varies greatly between writers, and it changes based on genre and era. Read advice on how to write prose, but pick and choose whatever fits your personal style. Story has many theories and standards. Read advice on how to build a story and then evaluate it based on how well it fit with the stories you personally find enjoyable.

(3) Your genre has its own rules. If you want to publish your work, then write however you wish. But if you are interested in publishing someday, know what writing advice is generally seen by most publishers as a rule within your genre, and differentiate that from what is merely personal preference between individual writers.

(4) Books impact their readers. Just because there is an audience for everything does not necessarily mean that all stories need to be written. Always consider the effect something might have on any readers who happen to pick up your book. If a piece of writing advice tells you to be conscientious of how you portray something that’s potentially problematic, then be conscientious. 

So, do take all writing advice with a grain of salt, but dismiss things only once you’re certain they don’t align with your writing goals. 

Happy salting…?

anonymous asked:

Do all the other boys have their own publishing companies?

I think so.

Harry owns HSA Publishing.

Niall used NJH Publishing for “This Town”, but is not listed as an owner or director yet, his accountant holds the company right now.

Liam has Hampton Music, but since it doesn’t say “Publishing” in the name, we are assuming that it’s for publishing at this point, but don’t know for certain.

And of course they are all still owner/directors of PPM Music Limited along with Zayn.