Prunella

anonymous asked:

If the characters of arthur had tumblr blogs what would they be about?

arthur: a mishmash of personal posts (mostly venting about dw), reblogs about the bionic bunny/dark bunny cinematic universe, tons of pictures of his dog

dw: runs an out-of-context mary moo cow screencap blog

buster: food gifsets and conspiracy theories. reblogs those bogus disney recipe posts and comments stuff like “tried this last night!! delicious 😋😋” and no one can tell if he’s joking or not 

francine: sports, horses, scathing vagueblogs, and the occasional callout about people in her class who happened to wrong her

muffy: basically richkidsofinstagram

brain: responds to all “SCIENCE SIDE OF TUMBLR EXPLAIN THIS” rallying cries with 5000+ word long explanations on stuff like “why a bubble pop when it cold”. longwinded but incredibly informative

fern: posts scary short stories that eventually get stolen + reposted by local horror blog thruppenceee, artistic photos of her neighbourhood, Which Romantic Poet Should You Fight, reblogs those “ok but imagine if [vague concept]” posts and writes a story around it and gets a dozen “omg u should write a book!” comments in response

sue ellen: travel photos, “why is no one talking about this??”-style news reblogs, martial arts gifsets, vegetarian recipes, posts reviews and writeups of local businesses in order to drum up support 

molly macdonald: has an art blog where she posts drawings of her OCs and reblogs lots of animation tutorials/references. people have doubts it’s actually her blog until they hit the posts where she tears into sexist character designs and depictions of female characters in media, then they know it’s definitely her

binky: main blog is about wrestling + fighting techniques but has an anonymous sideblog devoted to opera, ballet, and butterflies. occasionally posts his poetry (of which fern is a big fan)

george: posts blues music and videos of his ventriloquism acts with wally. a good and pure blog, free of drama

mr ratburn: 

prunella: The Signs As

Day 215: Tincturing Workshop

I’m leading a tincturing workshop this Sunday, so I thought it might be nice to share the packet I’m going to be handing out. It includes some tips on alcohol and vinegar tincturing, as well as recipes and some local Ozark yarbs to work into your herbal preparations. Enjoy!


Recipe Sheet – Tincturing Workshop

Brandon Weston
ozarkhealing.com
facebook.com/MountainManHealing
mountainmanhealing@gmail.com


Alcohol Tinctures

Fresh Herb:

  • Finely chop or grind clean herb to release juice and expose surface area.
  • Fill jar 2/3 to ¾ with herb. ~ OR ~ Fill jar ¼ to ½ with roots.
  • Pour alcohol over the herbs.
  • Jar should appear full of herb, but herb should move freely when shaken.

Dried Herb:

  • Use finely cut herbal material.
  • Fill jar ½ to ¾ with herb ~ OR ~ Fill jar ¼ to 1/3 with roots.
  • Pour alcohol over the herbs.
  • Roots will expand by ½ their size when reconstituted!

Alcohol Percentages*

40% – 50% (80-90 proof vodka)

  • “Standard” percentage range for tinctures.
  • Good for most dried herbs and fresh herbs that are not juicy.
  • Good for extraction of water soluble properties.

67.5% – 70% (½ 80 proof vodka + ½ 190 proof grain alcohol)

  • Extracts most volatile aromatic properties.
  • Good for fresh high-moisture herbs like lemon balm, berries, and aromatic roots.
  • The higher alcohol percentage will draw out more of the plant juices.

85% – 95% (190 proof grain alcohol)

  • Good for gums and resins.
  • Extracts aromatics and essential oils that are bound in the plant and do not dissipate easily.
  • The alcohol strength can produce a tincture that is not quite pleasant to take.
  • Often used for drop dosage medicines.
  • Will totally dehydrate herbs.

*information comes from the Mountain Rose Herbs blog

Macerating

  • Maceration is the process by which the active chemical compounds are leached into the solvent solution. This is usually done by shaking the jar that contains the alcohol or vinegar and the herbal plant matter. 
  • Alcohol tinctures need to be left to macerate for at least 2-3 weeks depending upon the ABV. The higher the ABV the less maceration time is needed.
  • Vinegar tinctures need to be left to macerate for at least a month before straining and bottling.

Easy Alcohol Tincture Recipes

Sarsaparilla Tincture: Anti-Inflammatory, Tonic (do not take if you have kidney problems)

  • Sarsaparilla root
  • Vodka

Wild Cherry Tincture: Antispasmodic, expectorant, sedative

  • Wild cherry bark
  • Vodka

Herbal Bitters (simplified): Tonic, diaphoretic, colds, flu, febrifuge, chills (contains thujone, may cause drowsiness)

  • 1 quart jar
  • ¼ c. thyme
  • ¼ c. oregano (or dittany)
  • ¼ c. chopped fresh ginger
  • ¼ c. hyssop
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 tbsp. cloves
  • Vodka

Stomach Bitters (simplified): Stomach issues, cramps, urinary issues, digestive issues

  • 1 quart jar
  • 4 tbsp dried dandelion root
  • 2 tbsp fennel seed
  • 2 tbsp fresh ginger
  • 2 tbsp dried peppermint leaves (or mountain mint)
  • Vodka

Vinegar Tinctures

  • Measurements and instructions are the same as with the alcohol tinctures at the beginning of the packet. Remember: vinegar tinctures need to be left longer to macerate, at least a month.

Easy Vinegar Tincture Recipes

Fire Tonic: Colds, flu, chills, general tonic

  • 1 32 oz. bottle apple cider vinegar. I like to use unfiltered, it seems to taste better and it’s easier on the stomach.
  • 5-10 cloves of garlic, crushed
  • 3-5 hot peppers, as hot as you can stand
  • 1 3 inch knob of ginger, crushed
  • 1 medium onion, peeled and diced
  • ¼ c. chopped mullein
  • ¼ c. chopped rosemary
  • ¼ c. chopped thyme
  • ¼ c. crushed star anise or green sweetgum balls (sources for shikimic acid which helps fight the flu virus)
  • Take all of this and combine it in large mason jar, all the herbs and vegetables are going to take up a lot of room. Let this stand in a dark place for about two months. Shake everyday. After it’s finished macerating strain off the liquid, add about a half cup honey, bottle.
  • Alternate Ozark yarbs to use: Dittany, Self-heal, Plantain, Horsemint

Vinegar Oxymels

  • Also called “sipping vinegars” these mixtures are basic vinegar tinctures sweetened and thickened with honey to make them more palatable.

Basic Oxymel:

  • 1 part herb : 3 parts honey and apple cider vinegar  
  • Quart mason jars: fill up ¼ jar with herb, ¼ with honey, then the rest with vinegar. Macerate for a few weeks.

Easy Oxymel Recipes

Colds and Immune System Oxymel:

  • 1 part elderberries
  • 1 part ginger root (dried)

Another for Colds with Cough Oxymel:

  • 1 part Mullein
  • 1 part Horehound

Stomach Complaints Oxymel:

  • 2 parts ginger
  • 1 part peppermint
  • 1 part fennel seed

Sinus Congestion Oxymel:

  • 2 parts garlic
  • 1 part cayenne pepper
  • 1 part thyme
  • 1 part rosemary

Beginners Ozark Medicinal Plants

Caution should always be taken when looking for medicinal plants out in the wild. Do not consume or use any plant that you are unsure about. The internet is a wonderful resource for plant identification. Look up photos and identification information for plants from reputable sources before collecting any plant out in the wild. NOTE also that many Ozark medicinal plants are endangered and should not be harvested out in the wild.

When wild-harvesting take only what you need at that time. DO NOT STOCKPILE! Chances are the plants will go bad before you can use them. A good rule of thumb for any plant is to count three plants then take one, that way there are plants left behind to go to seed. Leave the roots intact unless the root is being harvested, then try and leave a piece of the root or any seeds/berries behind in the soil.

Responsible harvesting means these medicinal plants will be around for many more generations.  

I’m not including photos of plants on purpose! I want folks to go look up the plants and find as many identifying photos and identifying information as they can. Do the work! Google is an amazing resource for plant identification.

+ means the plant is not native but is common in the Ozarks


Black-Eyed Susan, Rudbeckia hirta: Flowers, roots:

Root infusion used for dermatological needs. Used to wash snakebites. Decoction of whole plant taken to aid with heart disease. Decoction of root taken for colds and chills. Cold infusion of flowers taken for headache and as a febrifuge. Similar properties to other coneflowers (Purple coneflower, Missouri coneflower, etc.) Some say the active compounds are not water soluble. Better used as a tincture or extract.

*** Cautions: Asteraceae family ***


Cinquefoil, Five Finger Grass, Potentilla simplex: Leaves, root:

Leaves taken for colds and as a febrifuge. Root astringent, infusion taken for dysentery, diarrhea, and as a mouthwash for sores and thrush.


+Cleavers, Galium aparine: Leaves:

Strong infusion as laxative. Externally as a dermatological aid. Has been linked to aiding with lowering blood pressure.

*** Cautions: Laxative ***


Common Dittany, Cunila origanoides: Leaves, stems, flowers:

Related to Oregano and Marjoram and can be used in similar ways. As an infusion it’s good for colds and to help open up the sinuses. Boiled strong it helps the body sweat and can aid in lowering fevers. Infusion used to help aid a painful birth. Used as a stimulant and tonic. Contains trace amounts of thujone, an active chemical also found in wormwood, mugwort, and yarrow, and may cause drowsiness or headaches. Use only in small amounts and with caution.

*** Cautions: Contains trace amounts of thujone ***


Elderberry, Sambucus nigra or Sambucus canadensis: Berries, flowers, leaves, bark:

Berries used in formulas against chills and cold. Helps support the immune system. Infusion of berry used internally for rheumatism. Flower infusion used as a febrifuge and to sweat out a cold. Leaf infusion used to wash sores and prevent infection. Bark poultice used on sores, wounds, rashes, and other dermatological needs.

*** Cautions: Berries mildly toxic when unripe, foliage toxic in large quantities ***


Goldenrod, Solidago: Leaves, Flowers:

There are many different varieties of goldenrods, all of which have very similar medicinal uses. Topically the plant has traditionally been used in salves to help with sore muscles and arthritis. Internally it has traditionally been used as a diuretic to help bladder and kidney issues and to help break up “stones”. It is also a good diaphoretic that can help reduce a fever, and an astringent that can aid in remedying diarrhea. The flowers also make a wonderful yellow dye.

*** Cautions: Asteraceae family, may cause skin irritation ***


Horsemint, Monarda bradburiana: Leaves, flowers:

Infusion used for colds, chills, as a febrifuge, and for bowel complaints. Can be used externally in oils and salves for dermatological needs. Used in many of the same ways as Monarda fistulosa.


Jewelweed, Impatiens capensis: Leaves, stems, flowers:

Sap produced by the leaves and stems used for poison ivy, rashes, burns, and other dermatological needs. Cold infusion of leaves as a febrifuge. Infusion whole plant taken internally for stomach cramps.

*** Cautions: Seeds toxic ***


+Mullein, Verbascum thapsus: Leaves, flowers, root:

Leaves and flowers can be used to clear chest congestion (smoked or as an infusion), as an analgesic for rashes, aches and pains. Leaves can be wilted and used in poultices for swollen glands. Roots can be used in decoctions for gynecological issues.


+Plantain, Plantago major “Broadleaf Plantain” or Plantago lanceolata “Ribwort Plantain”: Leaves, roots, flowers:

Leaves used in poultices for bug bites, inflammations, rashes, cuts, bruises, stings, and other skin complaints. Whole plant infusions for colds, fever, upper respiratory complaints, rheumatism, hypertension, regulating blood sugar, bladder problems, kidney problems. Root used as a gentle expectorant and in helping sinus issues. “Snake Weed” because of the belief that the plant can help draw venom out of a snakebite. It was also thought that a person could carry the plant to help ward off snakes.


Self-Heal, All Heal, Prunella vulgaris: Leaves, flowers:

Infusion is an analgesic used to wash sores, wounds, and used in salves for many dermatological needs. Used to flavor other medicines. Infusion used as a febrifuge and against colds. Used for sore throats. Mild sedative. Helps with stomach and bowel complaints. Antidiarrheal. Respiratory aid.


Spicebush, Lindera benzoin: Leaves, Bark:

The red berries of the spicebush have long been used as a substitute for cinnamon or allspice in mountain recipes. The leaves can be made into a pleasant infusion for colds and headaches while the bark can be brewed strong for fevers and chills. The leaves can also be used topically for skin irritations, rashes, and bites. 


Sumac, Rhus glabra “Smooth Sumac” or Rhus typhina “Staghorn Sumac”: Berries, Leaves, Bark:

The berries are used in a tasty beverage I’ve heard called “sumacade”. It’s lemony taste is quite pleasant, and the drink is high in vitamin C. The berries and bark are astringent and can be used as an effective gargle for a cough or mouth sores. A decoction of the bark can also be taken internally for diarrhea. In the Fall the red leaves can be dried and smoked to induce dreaming.


Sweet Everlasting, Rabbit Tobacco, Pseudognaphalium obtusifolium/Gnaphalium obtusifolium: Leaves, flowers:

Decoction whole plant used as a sedative and to aid sleeping. Analgesic for sores, pains, aches, wounds, and many other dermatological needs. Antirheumatic (internal). Decoction for colds and chills. Smoked and used in infusions to clear chest congestion. Chewed for sore mouth and throat. Used in sweat baths against many illnesses. NOTE harvest leaves in the Fall when they start to turn brown.

*** Cautions: Asteraceae family ***


Sweetgum tree, Liquidambar styraciflua: Leaves, bark, gum, balls:

Leaves can be used in poultices for several dermatological issues, cuts, and bruises. Gum and inner bark used for diarrhea and flux. Infusion of bark taken for “flooding” (gynecological). Infusion of bark given as a sedative. Sweetgum balls, when green in the Spring before seeds have formed can be soaked in alcohol then given for colds and the flu (antiviral, antibacterial due to contained shikimic acid).


White-Leafed Mountain Mint, Pycnanthemum albescens: Leaves, Flowers, Stems:

As an infusion, can be used to help treat headaches, stomach complaints, and colds. Brewed strong it can help to reduce fevers.


Wild Bergamot, Beebalm, Monarda fistulosa: Leaves, flowers:

Infusion used for coughs, colds, and sore throats. Carminative for stomach complaints. Diaphoretic, febrifuge, and diuretic. Mild sedative. Abortifacient, so caution should be taken. Externally an analgesic used in poultices for pains, aches, cuts, and rashes.


Witch Hazel, Hamamelis vernalis (Ozark Witch Hazel) and American Witch Hazel, Hamamelis virginiana: Leaves, bark:

Leaves and bark astringent used externally as a skin toner and for many dermatological issues. Infusion taken for colds and as a febrifuge. Antirheumatic. Decoction of bark taken as an emetic.

*** Cautions: Bark emetic***


+Yarrow, Achillea millefolium: Flowers, leaves:

Leaves astringent, used in bowel complaints and with dermatological needs. Foliage infusion used for colds, as a febrifuge, upset stomach, and as a mild sedative. Leaves can be smoked to loosen phlegm and clear chest congestion.

*** Cautions: Asteraceae family ***

ectoviolet  asked:

i have 2 disagree w your assessment of prunella doing like a really basic horoscope/astrology blog.. if anything she'd be like an active tumblr witch like "emoji spell 2 clean my room like 2 charge reblog 2 clean your room". also henry screever fanfic probably.

this is 100% correct and true, thank you for this extremely accurate revision 

Herbs for Shadow Work

Last week, there was an anon who inspired me to put together a post about herbs I’ve used alongside shadow work. So here it is. Admittedly, I don’t work with herbs as much as I’d like, but I thought I’d offer the bit of the experience I do have with the handful of herbs I’m familiar with. 

Sage

Cleansing

Sage is a go-to for many practices. I consider it a jack-of-all-trades type, though the one thing it definitely masters is cleansing. That being said, I use it predominantly to cleanse both myself and my environment by burning it, usually before and after I engage in “sit-down” shadow work (i.e. journaling, tarot, premeditated rituals). 

Chamomile

Relaxation

Chamomile is soothing and meditative for me. For the relaxation effect, I burn it or make tea with it. 

Dream Induction 

Analyzing dreams is an enlightening exercise to use for shadow work and chamomile tea is a great way to induce them. Steep 2 tbs. of dried chamomile flowers in 1 cup of nearly boiling water for 5 minutes or so, then add some honey and a squeeze of lemon, and voila! You’ve got a delicious bedtime beverage that has the potential to aid you in shadow work. 

Lavender

Relaxation

Similar to chamomile, lavender is great for relaxation and sleep. Burn it or use some of the dried flowers for tea (it goes well with chamomile).

Upliftment

Where sage cleanses, lavender uplifts and comforts. I burn it during and/or shadow work sessions or just anytime I’m feeling down. The smell of it offers instant encouragement for me. 

Calea Zacatechichi 

Dream Induction

Another herb that serves to induce dreams is calea zacatechichi (aka calea z). This stuff can be a little more abrupt than chamomile, but I’ve found its mild effects interesting. 

Rosemary

Cleansing, Protection, Healing

Rosemary is a promoter of general well-being. I typically use it in baths and body scrubs. I sometimes take ritual baths for shadow work– water is a great element to work with in this arena and I find that it’s refreshing to physically cleanse afterwards using a rosemary-lemon salt scrub. 

Self-Heal 

Healing

Self-heal, scientific name being prunella vulgaris, is a wonderful little herb I discovered growing in my yard this past spring. It is said to cure a myriad of ailments. I’ve only really used it in homemade incense so far, which I found to be very earthy and grounding. I can see it having the potential to facilitate assimilating and healing from past traumas.  

Lemongrass (oil)

Upliftment

Though I’ve only dabbled, I feel confident in saying aromatherapy is a helpful practice to incorporate into shadow work. I’ve found lemongrass oil to be uplifting and revitalizing, great for the recovery process. 

Eucalyptus (oil)

Cleansing, Strengthening

There is something so empowering about the smell of eucalyptus. I use it in my baths or I dab a bit of oil on my forehead while introspecting or meditating. 

Black Tea

Relaxation, Introspection

For me, tea time is introspection time more often than not. Something about sipping on warm tea just makes me want to think. Coffee does this, too actually, but my thoughts are inclined to become a little more exacerbated when I drink coffee, so I recommend tea. 

Marijuana

Relaxation, Introspection, Preservation of Sanity

Now, this is where this post may be a wee bit controversial, but marijuana has been a huge help for me. It’s served as a natural antidepressant and I respect and appreciate it tremendously for that. But there is a downside, you can become dependent, and it can start playing with your shadow– it can cause you to become complacent, agitated, depressed, over-analytical, paranoid, etc. Moderation and discretion are key. 

Overall, I’ve found that marijuana teaches patience, appreciation, and acceptance, all things that are of tremendous value to the process of shadow work. But you must be careful not to let it become a distraction or a crutch, because it can very easily. 

*For the record, I am not recommending the illicit use of marijuana. This information has been provided as a means of sharing my experience, not directing others’.


Other herbs that I believe may be useful for shadow work include mugwort and valerian. Mugwort would do well for dream induction/recall and perhaps even memory recall. Valerian would be useful for relaxation and countering anxiety, as well as for sleep and dreaming. 

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I am fucking pumped for this story. I had to split it into two parts - which I’m totally not sorry about. I’ll upload the second part tomorrow. I got @agentpiku to read it through so it’s got her seal of approval. Hopefully it’ll have yours too. Thank you to the anon who requested this - you the real MVP. Enjoy, everybody!

Prompt[s]: In the theme of fairy tale fanfics could you do a kind of cinderella themed one where Odin is trying to marry off Loki for whatever reason and holds a ball and Loki is really not keen but Odin makes him go and he sees the reader and reader is really not keen and Loki is really confused because he can be annoyed about being here but like not anyone else. Thanks :)

‘A Wish Your Heart Makes’ (Part 1)

The ballroom had been transformed. Hidden away in a forgotten pocket of the palace, it usually lay dusty and derelict. However, at the sudden request of the Allfather, a band of servants had been dispatched to fix and tidy the dome-rooved room over the course of two weeks.

All four walls were now aglow. Candelabras held flickering flames aloft, painting the marble walls with gorgeous amber hues. Tying in with the decoration, a selection of wiry, leafless trees had been brought indoors and dipped in gold. Decorative orbs of red and silver hung from the branches, reflecting the candlelight and glittering like tiny little moons. A small string quartet and choral group were performing against the western windows, producing joyous music and warming the hearts of everybody in the room.

Everybody, that is, except the person for whom the ball was being held.

Keep reading

good-janet  asked:

I'm wondering what your and your followers' favorite lines from Arthur is! Mine is when Mrs. Read tells Arthur that Mr. Ratburn will be staying with them while his roof is fixed, and Arthur says, "Are there no hotels!?" in the most exasperated voice ever. ("The Rat Who Came to Dinner")

ahah, that’s a classic. 

i know there have been some lines that have really tickled me but i can’t uhhh. remember them right now. so i’m just gonna change my answer to “anything that mr ratburn says” because a lot of his lines are pure g– OH THAT WAS IT, in best of the nest when the brain is teaching mr ratburn how to use the internet and he discovers chat rooms: 

“The No Strings Attached bunraku puppet discussion group! Philistine! The shamisen is not a four-string Japanese lute. That’s the biwa!”