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Brown girls do ballet

Queer is not a slur.

Not when used as a self-identification, and not when used as an umbrella term within the community, at least.

See, here’s the thing: The most common identifier used by bi, pan, and trans people to describe their sexuality? Queer.

Given that multiple studies have shown that bi people alone comprise about half the community, that makes it by far the most common term we use to describe ourselves.

What’s more, it’s not just an identifier: it’s a rallying cry. It’s a banner the whole community has assembled under forever. “We’re here, we’re queer” is a cliché for a reason. It’s a statement of power, and of pride - yes, we’re weird. We don’t fit into the “acceptable” categories cisheteronormative society gives us. And that’s a good thing. It’s a call to demolish those “acceptable” boxes, to build a world we’re all part of.

Its rejection is a relatively recent move by the same homonationalism that brought us “Bi people don’t belong,” the thrilling sequel “Trans people don’t belong,” and the stunning conclusion “Ace people don’t belong.” It’s a deliberate strategy employed by respectability politicians seeking a seat at the table - taking the work we’ve put in and distancing themselves from us so they can tell the straights “We deserve your respect because we’re just like you! We even hate queers!”

(And don’t think it’s a coincidence that the community suddenly forgot the massive, massive overlap between “queer” and “poly” when building the very self-conscious image of two clean-cut upper-middle-class smiling young professional men or women either. Anything that wasn’t “respectable” enough had to go. My deepest thanks to the person who pointed this out.)

In the rush for our place in an oppressive hell, we’ve lost our revolutionary edge, lost our fire, and lost a lot of what drove us in the first place. Fuck. That.

I’m queer, and you will never take that away from me.

Shoutout to the woman who are full of self love, who know their value, and who refuse to entertain people who don’t acknowledge their light. Shoutout to the woman who aren’t full of self love but who are on a journey to recovery and those who aren’t on a journey, may you find peace in 2017. Shoutout to the woman who recognise when to let go, who aren’t bitter and those who hold peace in their hearts. Shoutout to the women who are still angry, who aren’t over things and who still hold pain or resentment in their hearts, may you find peace soon. Shoutout to the queens who are focusing on bettering themselves so when they cross paths with a King or a Queen, they are ready to love and exchange reciprocated energy. Shoutout to queens who society deem as unworthy, ghetto or lost. You’re none of the above. FUCK them. Stay true to yourself - you are royal. Shoutout to the women who support each other and don’t tear other women down. Shoutout to the women who fight for the rights of other woman. Shoutout to the women who are patient, kind, nurturing, compassionate and empowering. Shoutout to women who aren’t familiar with these traits due to circumstances beyond their control. You are still lovable and deserving. Shoutout to the women with mental illnesses - we may never understand your daily battle but we salute you for waking up and facing another day. Shoutout to the women who conquered abusive relationships and R.I.P to those who lost their lives. Shoutout to the women who hold their families together, with or without recognition. Shoutout to the children stuck in women’s bodies who were forced to become women too soon - to those who had to become mothers to their siblings, to those who lost their innocence by force and those who never had a childhood, you survived and you will continue to strive! Shoutout to the single mothers and the necessary sacrifices you had to make in order for you to provide a better life for your children. Shoutout to the stay at home mums who have put their careers on hold to raise a family. How you did it all - we will never comprehend. But thank you. Shoutout to the grandmothers who had to become mothers to their children’s children. Shoutout to the women who had to make the most difficult decision to let go of their children. Shoutout to the women who had to bury their children - words fail me, just stay strong. Shoutout to the women who had to battle cancer. Fucking Fuck cancer. Shoutout to the entrepreneurs, the business women, the pioneers and all the professional women, you have pushed the boundaries, your struggle was not in vain. And finally, shoutout the women who are still on their journey to fulfilment.

- Meggan Roxanne

anonymous asked:

If muscle mass has only a small impact on fight abilities, what's with the prevalence of weight classes? And why are martial arts and boxing champions generally men?

See, you were trying to sneak around it with that start on muscle mass but this is about the idea that women can fight and or fight as well as a man. We get these questions a lot, and the answer is always the same. However, the question itself always displays the asker’s ignorance on the subject matter and about combat in general. You aren’t the first to go, “but boxing!!!” as if it means something or is a winning point. Usually, “muscles” is a go to standard because that’s what so many have been led to believe makes men superior.

When I get these questions, I can always tell this person who asked has never been to a martial arts competition of any kind. If they had, they would know Women’s Divisions are a standard practice. They would also know that with an exception of major tournaments where there are enough participants to justify it, the girls and the boys spar each other at the ranks below black belt. Sometimes, the boys win. Sometimes, the girls win. The breakdown is by age (adults/kids) and belt rank, not by gender.

I’ll tell you though, none of the boy’s in the black belt division wanted to jump in with the girls. Those girls were vicious. Men’s sparring was much more laid back, and slower. Women’s TKD… yeesh.

Again, in most martial arts tournaments there are no weight classes. The breakdown is by age and rank, with gender as a secondary when there are enough participants to justify multiple divisions. Weight classes are a boxing tradition and other, similar bloodsports which rears it’s head when they have enough participants to justify one. In many Taekwondo tournaments, you can easily end up with a 150 pound black belt sparring one weighing in at 250. And you won’t know what they weigh anyway because there is no “weighing in”.

I’ve explained before why there are weight classes in boxing. The moment you stop and realize that it’s a sport with a purpose to make money, the reasoning behind the weight classes will become fairly clear. (Hint: it’s entertainment and aesthetics.)

That said, the “boxing champions are generally men” crap is, well, crap. They don’t let women box men professionally, or at the collegiate level. It’s hard to make a case for muscle mass when citing professional sports where women are barred from competing. Now, there was a time when there were women boxers who boxed with each other and against men. In the 1800s, it was called bareknuckle boxing. This is the granddaddy version of modern boxing, when it was all back alleys without gloves or handwraps.

That said, women’s boxing is making a comeback at the collegiate level. There’s a National Champion in Women’s Collegiate Boxing walking around somewhere in the US right now. There are multiple female martial arts champions from a variety of disciplines wandering around all over the world. The UFC has opened a division for female fighters. This is like asking why there aren’t female wrestlers (there are) or female quarterbacks (there are). One of the greatest snipers in history is a woman.

You just don’t hear about them or the women who did the hard work pushing back to fight for the categories to be re-added.

That said, comparing the restrictions applied in sports to a person’s “fighting ability” is a mistake. You’re not asking an honest question so much as floundering for a popular misconception. It’s essentially the same as saying, “it’s ridiculous for there to be female fighters in this historical fiction because there were no female warriors”.

1) That assertion is patently false.

2) When one gender is barred from participating by the established rules of a modern sport whose history you don’t understand, you can’t then turn around and ask why most of the champions are men.

History makes a case for a lot of female combatants throughout history, but you’re not going to know they’re there if you don’t go looking for them. Their accomplishments tend to get wiped out.

-Michi

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{PART 1} I Won’t Stop You // Jeon Jungkook, Vampire!AU

Originally posted by jengkook

Pairing: Jungkook x Reader

Genre: Vampire!AU, Fantasy, Angst, Smut

Summary; You drive to your boss‘s house with the intention of returning his wallet he left at the office. You feel uneasy, seeing his manor for the first time - Jungkook also feels uneasy, but for reasons that you could never begin to imagine.

A/N; This is the first instalment of a request I received that I decided to turn into a series that will contain smut. I’ll release a new chapter every Tuesday between 9pm-10pm (U.K Time), I hope you enjoy part 1 ^^

{Part 1} {Part 2}

Keep reading

Okay but imagine trans McGonagall always using the correct mr/ms/mx titles for her students

Trans McGonagall absolutely not tolerating students dead naming other students

Trans McGonagall passing down all the dysphoria reducing spells and hormone therapy potions she’s discovered over the years.

Trans McGonagall teaching basic Gender Studies and LGBTQ+ History as an elective class

Trans McGonagall suggesting new names of famous historical wizards in various different languages for  trans students

Trans McGonagall unrestricting all the books on gender and sexuality from the restricted section in library to the disapproval of the school board

Trans McGonagall continuing to be a LGBTQ+ representative and advocate in the teacher community and even more so when she becomes Headmistress

Trans McGonagall helping her students to celebrate their gender identities

Trans McGonagall staring down anyone, parent, professor or student, who is disrespectful to her community

Just… trans McGonagall guys!!!

Sexism in sports is so ingrained, that if you ask “should women in professional soccer/football be paid the same as men?” People will gut reaction say “no! Because they dont bring in as much money as the men”

Even though, hey guess what, the womens teams bring in MORE REVENUE THAN THE MEN.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/football/article-3521888/The-women-s-football-team-earn-14m-revenue-men-paid-old-fashioned-sexism.html

http://www.businessinsider.com/men-women-us-soccer-player-salaries-2016-4

They play better, earn more, and are paid less.

theguardian.com
Lewes FC become first professional club to pay women and men equally
Lewes FC have become the first professional or semi-professional football club to pay their women’s team the same as their men’s team, as part of their Equality FC campaign
By Marcus Christenson

“By committing to paying our women’s and men’s teams equally, and providing equal resource for coaching, training and facilities, we hope to spark a change across the UK that will help put an end to the excuses for why such a deep pay disparity has persisted in our sport. Together with our owners, donors and sponsors, Lewes FC can show that equal pay can be implemented to the benefit of both women and men in sport and beyond.”

The East Sussex club set out their aims as follows:

• Raising and setting the playing budgets for the women’s and men’s first teams at an equal level.

• Providing equal resource for coaching, performance and strength & conditioning staff.

• Upgrading equipment and facilities to meet the standards required by higher football divisions.

• Investment in local grassroots outreach to drive equal participation in football from girls and boys.

The club’s new campaign, Equality FC, aims to raise awareness about gender inequality in football and encourage more support for women’s and girls’ football across the UK and around the world.