President-Robert-Mugabe

Recently Robert Mugabe President of Zimbabwe, declared that White people will not be allowed to own land in Zimbabwe. At one point Zimbabwe had nearly 300 white farmers on their land in 2011. President Mugabe gave a speech saying, “

“We will have no mercy for white people regarding the land, they cannot own our soil.” They will not be allowed to own land. No! They can own properties and factories according to our laws but not a piece of land.” “The permits we are launching here should be a clear message to those in Britain and the United States that whatever dreams they have of trying to sneak back through the back door will not work. We want it indicated in our laws that Zimbabwe has truly come back to its owners and the whites will never come back. ”

Post made by: @oba_tayo

400,000 people have signed a petition to stop endangered animal hunting in Zimbabwe.

By Wednesday morning, a petition had collected nearly 400,000 signatures condemning Cecil the lion’s death and urging Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe “to stop issuing hunting permits to kill endangered animals.” The petition explains how Cecil’s death will devastate the local lion population.

50 million Africans face hunger after crops fail again

UN fears that food aid will not arrive in time to help people of ravaged countries

Farmer Serena Gadinala stands next to her wilted crops in the Neno district of southern Malawi. Photograph: Tamara van Vliet/OCHA

by John Vidal
in Lilongwe, Malawi

Up to 50 million people in Africa will need food by Christmas as a crisis across the continent triggered by El Niño worsens, the UN and major international charities have warned.

A second year of deep drought in much of southern and eastern Africa has ravaged crops, disrupted water supplies and driven up food prices, leaving 31 million people needing food now, and 20 million more likely to run out this year.

A further 10 million people in Ethiopia, six million in southern Sudan and five million in Yemen were in danger of starvation after floods and drought, said the UN.

The severest El Niño in 30 years was expected to tail off in the next month as hot equatorial waters in the Pacific returned to normal temperatures, but its effects would be felt for many more months, said the World Food Programme. Stephen O’Brien, the UN’s humanitarian chief, said: “The collective impact of the El Niño phenomenon has created one of the world’s biggest disasters for millions of people, yet this crisis is receiving little attention.

“The numbers are staggering. One million children in eastern and southern Africa alone are severely acutely malnourished, and across southern Africa 32 million people need assistance and that figure is likely to increase.” The UN predicts that food will start running out on a large scale by July, with the crisis peaking between December and next April.

Malawi, Mozambique, Lesotho, Zimbabwe, Namibia, Madagascar, Angola and Swaziland have declared national emergencies or disasters, as have seven of South Africa’s nine provinces. Botswana, Kenya, Somalia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo have also been badly hit.

In Zimbabwe, President Robert Mugabe has appealed for foreign aid to buy food and Malawi is expected to declare in the next few weeks that more than 8 million people, half the population, will need food aid by November. Maize prices have risen by 60% across much of the region within a few months.

Seven million people in Syria, 10 million in Ethiopia and 14 million in Yemen also needed food urgently, said the UN. Elhadj As Sy, secretary-general of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, pledged $110m after visiting Malawi and Zimbabwe last week. “We cannot describe enough how dire the situation is,” he said.

Abdoulaye Balde, the World Food Programme country director in Mozambique’s capital, Maputo, said: “The situation is critical. We are at the point of no return.”

Fears are mounting that international donors, meeting at this week’s UN humanitarian summit in Istanbul, will not pledge enough in time to buy and deliver food. Their fear is that the Syrian civil war and refugee crises are putting an unprecedented strain on aid. African leaders have requested more than $1.5bn, but less than 25% has been pledged.

“The window for responding in a meaningful manner is closing rapidly,” said Shadrack Omol, senior adviser to the UN’s children fund, Unicef. “The concern is that slow-onset emergencies, such as the one we are dealing with in southern Africa, do not get enough attention because they creep up on us.”

Since July 2015, Britain has contributed about £150m for aid to El Niño-affected countries in Africa, including Malawi, Ethiopia, Kenya Mozambique, Somalia and Uganda. The international development minister, Nick Hurd, said: “We cannot and will not stand idly by while millions suffer. Britain is playing a leading role in helping countries across Africa to cope with the impact of El Niño. Support for people affected by El Niño is important to Africa and also firmly in Britain’s national interest.”

Source:- http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2016/may/22/africans-face-famine-after-crops-fail

An American Dentist Killed Zimbabwe’s Famous Lion

By Taylor Hill

Cecil the lion, a famous black-maned resident of Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park, died at the hands of an American dentist, conservationists claim.

They say Walter Palmer paid $50,000 to hunt and kill Cecil with a bow and arrow. The incident occurred around July 6, with a professional hunting outfit reportedly luring Cecil outside the boundaries of the protected reserve using a dead animal as bait.

“Mr. Palmer shot Cecil with a bow and arrow but this shot didn’t kill him,” Johnny Rodrigues, chairman of the Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force, said in a statement. “They tracked him down and found him 40 hours later when they shot him with a gun. Cecil, who was known all over the world would have earned millions of dollars just from sightseeing. Walter Palmer apparently paid $50,000 for the kill.“

It wasn’t the first kill for Palmer, who has multiple photos posted on the website Trophy Hunt America showing the Minnesota resident posing with dead lions, rhinos, water buffalo, warthogs, and other animals.

The Telegraph is reporting from two independent sources that Palmer was indeed the hunter listed on the permit documents, and a spokesperson for Palmer told the news outlet that Palmer believes he is the one responsible for the lion’s death.

“As far as I understand, Walter believes that he might have shot that lion that has been referred to as Cecil,” the spokesperson said. “What he’ll tell you is that he had the proper legal permits and he had hired several professional guides, so he’s not denying that he may be the person who shot this lion. He is a big game hunter; he hunts the world over.”

In a statement sent to the Minneapolis Star Tribune, Walter said he didn’t know the lion he killed was a local favorite or that it was radio-collared for study by Oxford University professors.

“I relied on the expertise of my local professional guides to ensure a legal hunt,” the statement said. “Again, I deeply regret that my pursuit of an activity I love and practice responsibly and legally resulted in the taking of this lion.”

Theo Bronkhorst—the professional hunter who led Palmer to Cecil—and another hunter associated with the baiting have reportedly been arrested by Zimbabwe police. The Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority said it is trying to reach Palmer regarding the illegal hunt, and he could face poaching charges.

The Zimbabwe Professional Hunters and Guides Association said it has suspended Bronkhorst indefinitely from the organization for the way the hunt was carried out.

“ZPHGA reiterates it will not tolerate any illegal hunting or any unethical practices by any of its members and their staff,” the organization said in a statement. “We will await the completion of the current investigation by Zimbabwe Parks Wildlife Management Authority before commenting any further.”

Park rangers and regular visitors knew the 13-year-old lion as a tourist attraction, easily approached by safari guide jeeps for photo opportunities. Cecil had a propensity for lounging in the middle of roads, said Bryan Orford, a former park guide and a longtime visitor to Hwange. Hunting such an easy target only made the killing of Cecil more wrong, he said.

“I used to drive down the railway line road following Cecil and had to wait for him to get off the road,” Orford told TakePart last week. “This walking in front of the vehicle would go on for ages. Other times he would lie in the road, and you had to drive off the road to go around him.”

The death of Cecil not only means one less endangered African lion in the world but also could mean the demise of a whole line of cubs sired by the leader of the Hwange pride.

“The saddest part of all is that now that Cecil is dead, the next lion in the hierarchy Jericho will most likely kill all Cecil’s cubs so that he can insert his own bloodline into the females,” Rodrigues said. “This is standard procedure for lions.”

Conservationists and animal activists are flocking to a petition asking Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe to stop issuing hunting permits that allow for the killing of endangered animals. The petition was started July 22 and has picked up steam with the revealing of the hunter’s name. More than 90,000 had signed the Care2 petition as of Tuesday afternoon.

- Read more here on TakePart.com

Homosexuality has existed throughout human history. Anthropologists found an ethnic group in central Africa where it was customary for a male warrior to marry a teenage boy and celebrate victory in battle by having sexual intercourse. In many cases, the very laws being imposed so zealously were introduced by the European empires that carved up and plundered Africa. “Prior to western colonization, there are no records of any African laws against homosexuality,” said Peter Tatchell, the veteran human rights and gay rights campaigner. “The real import into Africa was not homosexuality but homophobia.” It was enforced legally by colonial administrators and ideologically by Christian missionaries. Tatchell, who twice tried to arrest Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe over human rights abuses, added: “The colonial narratives of racism and homophobia are very closely intertwined. It’s one of the great tragedies of Africa that so many people have internalized the homophobia of that colonial oppression and now proclaim it as their own authentic African tradition.”