Portuguese-Man-o'-War

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Bioluminescent Deep-Sea Siphonophore

An eerily fantastic creature that appears to be a single, large organism, but which is actually a colony of numerous individual jellyfish-like animals that behave and function together as a single entity. The individual units, called zooids, all share the same genetic material and each perform a specialized role within the colony. 

The best-known siphonophore is the poisonous Portuguese Man o War (Physalia physalis), which lives at the surface of the ocean, unlike the one shown in this video (filmed at a depth of 770 meters). Some siphonophore species can grow up to 40 meters (130 ft) in length. (Source) @sixpenceee

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( white-vomit.tumblr.com <3 )

@sixpenceee , I recently fell in love o-o

Portuguese man-of-war :

A floating colonial coelenterate with a number of polyps and a conspicuous float. It bears long tentacles which are able to inflict painful stings and occurs chiefly in warm seas.

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Portugiesische Galeere (Physalia physali) /  Portuguese man o’ war

The Atlantic Portuguese man o’ war (Physalia physalis), also known as the man-of-war, blue bottle, or floating terror, is a marine hydrozoan of the family Physaliidae found in the Atlantic Ocean, as well as the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Its venomous tentacles can deliver a painful (and sometimes fatal) sting.

Die äußere Erscheinungsform der Portugiesischen Galeere ähnelt zwar stark einer Qualle, tatsächlich besteht sie jedoch aus einer ganzen Kolonie voneinander abhängiger Polypen. Eine Vielzahl Polypen schloss sich zusammen, deren Einzeltiere sich nach und nach auf bestimmte Aufgaben wie Nahrungsaufnahme, Fortpflanzung, Abwehr oder die Ausbildung von Fangfäden spezialisierten. An den Tentakeln finden sich bis zu 1000 Nesselzellen pro Zentimeter, die ein Giftgemisch aus verschiedenen Proteinen enthalten. Dieses wirkt schon bei Hautkontakt direkt an den Nervenzellen. Bei Menschen verursacht die Nesselung starke Schmerzen.

© khf-foto

Safety Tips For Tourists In Australia

(all of which are based on things I see tourists doing every single year. You frighten us. Seriously. We know you haven’t been taught any better, so this is an attempt to help)

  • I know not everyone is swimming between the flags at the beach. I know. It’s because locals know what a rip looks like, know where all the rocks are, and know when the tide is going in or out. And you know what? We still find ourselves in trouble. But we’re all usually experienced enough that we can stay afloat on the rare occasions we actually need rescuing, and everyone knows you’re an idiot and calls you such when you get out. You do not, and you’re also in the way of surfers (surfboards, by the way, do not have brakes). Stay between the flags.
  • Watch your children at the rockpools. Seriously. Tell them that looking is fine, but under no circumstances are they to put their hand in the water, and they DEFINITELY shouldn’t try to pick anything up. If you’re driving home from the beach and your kid (or anyone) is unusually tired, GET THEM TO A HOSPITAL IMMEDIATELY. They may have been bitten by a blue-ringed octopus, in which case they’ll need emergency treatment.
  • Those blue jellyfish-like things that wash up on the beach? They’re a Portuguese Man O’ War, or bluebottle. They’re not dead – just stuck until the tide comes back. Don’t touch them – their sting HURTS. Hot water helps. You shouldn’t need a doctor, but it won’t hurt to get it checked out if you think you’re having an allergic reaction. Also, don’t pop the tops of the little guys – that’s just cruel.
  • Similarly, don’t stomp on the little molluscs and things growing on the rocks. I’ve seen so many kids make a game of this. They’re not dangerous, but they are living creatures. (Also, don’t walk near them barefoot. Trust me - I’ve made that mistake myself)
  • It’s recently been brought to my attention that other countries don’t have this, so I’ll add it here – if you hear a continuous horn/beep/siren at the beach, that’s a shark alarm. It’s a good idea to get out of the water at that point.
  • The size or hairiness of a spider has nothing to do with how venomous it is. See: huntsman spider vs. redback spider.
  • If it’s summer, wear sunscreen. I don’t care if it’s overcast. Skin cancer is one of the biggest killers here, and that’s for people who are used to our sunlight. Not to mention that it IS possible to get so sunburnt that you can’t even wear a shirt. I remember attendance at my school dropped 50% after one carnival because no-one could get their uniform on.

Feel free to add more in reblogs! I will be doing so as I think of them.

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The Portuguese Man o’ War are responsible for up to 10,000 human stings in Australia each summer. The stinging, venom-filled nematocysts in the tentacles of the Man o’ War can paralyze small fish and other prey. Detached tentacles and dead specimens (including those that wash up on shore) can sting just as painfully as the live creature in the water and may remain potent for hours or even days after the death of the creature or detachment of the tentacle.

Stings usually cause severe pain to humans, leaving whip-like, red welts on the skin that typically last 2 or 3 days after the initial sting, though the pain should subside after an hour. However, the venom can travel to the lymph nodes and may cause, depending on the amount of venom, a more intense pain. Stings may also cause death, although this is extremely rare. 

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Portuguese Men o’ War are best known for being those super, duper poisonous jellyfish. Except you’ve been lied to, they aren’t jellyfish. They aren’t even really animals! They’re like, colonies of animals. They’re called siphonophores, and honestly unless you made a life choice to study biology or sea creatures or some shit you don’t even WANT to know what that means in science terms. Put simply, siphonophores are like Voltrons. Like the arms and the legs and the body, they’re all their own guys, but they work together as one. Except I think Voltron breaks up into space ships, and if you break up a siphonophore they all die. To be honest I’ve never seen Voltron. I shouldn’t be talking about it like I’m an expert.

Some more mermaid ideas for y'all to draw for me!

Portuguese man o’ war mermaids that spend their days floating on the surface and watching the clouds go by.

Mantis Shrimp mermaids that hold boxing matches.

Humuhumunukunukuapua'a mermaids that hide in the coral reefs and surprise scuba divers.

Pufferfish mermaids that have big prickly bellies.

Geoduck mermaids with enormous siphons that get mistaken for penises.

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Despite its outward appearance, the man o’ war is not a jellyfish but a siphonophore, which differs from jellyfish in that it is not actually a single organism, but a colonial organism made up of many minute individuals called zooids. Each of these zooids is highly specialized, and, although structurally similar to other solitary animals, they are attached to one another and physiologically integrated to the extent that they are incapable of independent survival.

The name “man o’ war” comes from the man-of-war, an 18th-century armed sailing ship, and the cnidarian’s supposed resemblance to the Portuguese version at full sail.

The Portuguese man o’ war lives at the surface of the ocean. The gas-filled bladder, or pneumatophore, remains at the surface, while the remainder is submerged. Since the man o’ war has no means of propulsion, it is moved by a combination of winds, currents, and tides. Although it can be found anywhere in the open ocean (especially warm water seas), it is most commonly found in the tropical and subtropical regions of the Pacific and Indian oceans and in the northern Atlantic Gulf Stream. 

Today I learnt that the Portuguese Man O’ War is not, in fact, a jellyfish, but a siphonophore. I also learnt that it is not one single animal, but is actually made up of many tiny organisms known as zooids. These zooids are attached to each other and are unable to survive on their own. 

The blanket octopus has been known to tear off the tentacles of the Portuguese Man O’ War to use for defensive purposes (they are immune to the sting).

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The Portuguese man o’ war (Physalia physalis), also known as the Portuguese man-of-war, Man-Of-War, or bluebottle, though often mistaken as a jellyfish, is a marine cnidarian of the family Physaliidae. The man o’ war is not a jellyfish but a siphonophore, which differs from jellyfish in that it is not actually a single organism, but a colonial organism made up of many minute individuals called zooids.  Each of these zooids is highly specialized, and, although structurally similar to other solitary animals, they are attached to one another and physiologically integrated to the extent that they are incapable of independent survival.

The Portuguese man o’ war is composed of four types of polyp. One of the polyps, a gas-filled bladder called the pneumatophore (commonly known as the sail), enables the organism to float. This sail is bilaterally symmetrical, with the tentacles at one end, and is translucent, tinged blue, purple, pink, or mauve. The Portuguese man o’ war generates carbon monoxide in its gas gland, filling its gas bladder with up to 13% carbon monoxide. The sail is equipped with a siphon. In the event of a surface attack, the sail can be deflated, allowing the man o’ war to briefly submerge.

The other three polyp types are known as dactylozooid (defence), gonozooid (reproduction), and gastrozooid (feeding). These polyps are clustered. The dactylzooids make up the tentacles that are typically 10 metres (33 ft) in length but can be up to 50 metres (160 ft). The long tentacles “fish” continuously through the water, and each tentacle bears stinging, venom-filled nematocysts (coiled, thread-like structures), which sting and kill small sea organisms such as small fish and shrimp. Contractile cells in each tentacle drag the prey into range of the digestive polyps, the gastrozooids, which surround and digest the food by secreting enzymes that break down proteins, carbohydrates and fats, while the gonozooids are responsible for reproduction.

The stinging, venom-filled nematocysts in the tentacles of the Portuguese man o’ war can paralyze small fish and other prey. Detached tentacles and dead specimens (including those that wash up on shore) can sting just as painfully as the live organism in the water and may remain potent for hours or even days after the death of the organism or the detachment of the tentacle.

The Portuguese man o’ war is a carnivore. Using its venomous tentacles, a man o’ war traps and paralyzes its prey. Typically, men o’ war feed upon small aquatic organisms, such as fish and plankton.

Stings usually cause severe pain to humans, leaving whip-like, red welts on the skin that normally last 2 or 3 days after the initial sting, though the pain should subside after about an hour. However, the venom can travel to the lymph nodes and may cause, depending on the amount of venom, a more intense pain.

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The Portuguese Man o’ War, also known as the Bluebottle, is a jellyfish-like marine invertebrate of the family Physaliidae. Despite its outward appearance, the Man o’ War is not a jellyfish, but a siphonophore. Siphonophorae differ from jellyfish in that they are not actually single creatures, but colonial organisms made up of many minute individuals called zooids. Each of these zooids is highly specialized, and, although structurally similar to other solitary animals, they are attached to one another and physiologically integrated to the extent that they are incapable of independent survival.

the signs as jellyfish

Aries: Mastigia Papua

Taurus: Australian Spotted Jellyfish

Gemini: Stygiomedusa Gigantea

Cancer: Sea Nettle

Leo: Lion’s Mane Jellyfish

Virgo: Moon Jellyfish

Libra: Comb Jellyfish

Scorpio: Portuguese Man o’ War

Sagittarius: Nomura Jellyfish

Capricorn: Cannonball Jellyfish

Aquarius: Irukandji

Pisces: Box Jellyfish