Pitcher-Plant

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Nepenthes jamban 

Native to the montane forests of Northen Sumatra, (typically 1800 - 2100 metres above sea level) N. jamban  is distinct among Nepenthes in its particularly infundibular (funnel shaped) pitchers and its narrow operculum containing 20 - 30 visible glands concentrated at its apex. (glands not visible in these photos.

Top left is a terrestrial pitcher while top right and bottom are upper pitchers. (a particular Nepenthes species’ pitchers size and shape is usually affected by whether or not a pitcher is close to or on the ground or attatched to the climbing vine and therefore elevated. Lower pitchers tend to be larger, wider and more colourful while upper pitchers are more slender and less colourful, FYI. :))

Source: Wikipedia

Photo Credit:  Alfindra Primaldhi

It’s finally warm and humid enough to hang out the cold sensitive carnivorous plants. My Nepenthes Ventrata just started to develop pitchers a couple of months ago after a full pitcher-less year, and they’re already way bigger than they have been the two years I’ve had him.

The wasps now have a nice surprise waiting for them on my balcony.

Freshwater copepod (Cyclops) female with eggs. Credit: Warren Photographic

Copepods (/ˈkoʊpɪpɒd/; meaning “oar-feet”) are a group of small crustaceans found in the sea and nearly every freshwater habitat. Some species are planktonic (drifting in sea waters), some are benthic (living on the ocean floor), and some continental species may live in limnoterrestrial habitats and other wet terrestrial places, such as swamps, under leaf fall in wet forests, bogs, springs, ephemeral ponds, and puddles, damp moss, or water-filled recesses (phytotelmata) of plants such as bromeliads and pitcher plants.