Pink-Fairy-Armadillo

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The Chlamyphorus truncates, or more commonly, the pink fairy armadillo, is a boney armored, yellowish furred, mammal of the Dasypodidae family, usually 3.5 – 4.5 inches in length.

Found in and around both the sandy and grassland terrain of central Argentina, the pink fairy armadillo is a Subterranean, nocturnal and solitary animal, surviving on a diet of plants and insects.

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Pink Fairy Armadillo (Chlamyphorus truncatus)

Also known as the lesser fairy armadillo, the pink fairy armadillo is a unique species of small armadillo found only in Central Argentina. Pink fairy armadillos are the smallest known armadillo, with the largest individual growing to around 4 inches long. They are primarily nocturnal and burrow near anthills, as their main food item is ants, however they will eat worms, snails, plants and roots as-wells. Like a golden mole or a marsupial mole the pink fairy armadillo navigates its surroundings via “sand swimming” using its powerful claws to move through the sand as if it was water, its pink back/head plates shield it from debris. Although the pink fairy armadillo is listed as ‘data-deficient’ by the IUCN it suffers from habitat destruction as cattle farms are taking over its natural range. 

Phylogeny

Animalia-Chordata-Mammalia-Cingulata-Dasypodidae-Euphractinae-Chalmyphorus-truncatus

Image Source(s)

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Pink Fairy Armadillo. The pink fairy armadillo (Chlamyphorus truncatus) or pichiciego is the smallest species of armadillo (mammals of the family Dasypodidae, mostly known for having a bony armor shell). It is found in central Argentina, where it inhabits dry grasslands and sandy plains with thorn bushes and cacti.The pink fairy armadillo is approximately 90–115 mm (3.5-4.5 inches) long, excluding the tail, and is pale rose or pink in color. It has the ability to bury itself completely in a matter of seconds if frightened. Images: Mariella Superina/Paul Vogt
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The Pink Fairy Armadillo is the smallest member of the armadillo family at only 4 inches maximum length.  It is found in central Argentina where it inhabits dry grasslands and sandy plains with thorn bushes and cacti. It has the ability to bury itself completely in a matter of seconds if frightened.
The Pink Fairy Armadillo burrows small holes near ant colonies in dry dirt. It feeds mainly on ants and ant larvae near its burrow.


This is the pink fairy armadillo, or pichiciego, the world’s smallest armadillo species. It lives in central Argentina and, excluding the tail, it is pink. When frightened it can bury itself in just a few seconds. Little is known about this tiny nocturnal creature, but in 2008 it was listed as a threatened species –habitat loss as well as feral cats and dogs have contributed to its decline.

Image: Cliff/Flickr and Nick Baker source 
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The pink fairy armadillo (Chlamyphorus truncatus) or pichiciego is the smallest species of armadillo (mammals of the family Dasypodidae, recognized by a bony armor shell), first described by R. Harlan in 1825. This desert-adapted animal is endemic to central Argentina and can be found inhabiting sandy plains, dunes, and scrubby grasslands.

Pink fairy armadillos have small eyes, silky yellowish white fur, and a flexible dorsal shell that is solely attached to its body by a thin dorsal membrane. In addition, its spatula-shaped tail protrudes from a vertical plate at the blunt rear of its shell. This creature exhibits nocturnal and solitary habits and has a diet that is mainly composed of insects, worms, snails, and various plant parts.

(via Wikipedia)

Hey, you know when you’re casually discussing pink fairy armadillos with illustrators from the other side of the Atlantic on Twitter and agree to exchange illustrations on that very theme?

Well! This is the resulting illustration. I was inspired by the animal signs related to Chinese New Year, though this year it is in fact the ‘Year of the Horse’.

I printed the illustration at postcard size, with a calendar on the opposite side.

[zaraillustrates.com]

More than nature is represented in the prepared skinof a pink fairy armadillo (Chlamyphorus truncatus) collected by the naturalist Louis Agassizin Mendoza, Argentina, in 1872. It recalls a deep-sea dredging expeditionaround South America on the steamship Hassler in 1871-72. Led by Agassiz and chronicled by his wife [Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, also a naturalist, and the first president of Radcliffe College], the expedition sampled life at the sea bottom and onshore, looking in part for evidence that Agassiz hoped would refute Darwin’s theory of evolution. … [This] specimen is a portal not only into natural history but also human history.

Agassiz’s pink fairy armadillo is an example of the objects that are featured in Tangible Things: Making History through Objects, an exploration of various collections from Harvard University that presents an innovative new framework for thinking about museums.

Photograph by Samantha van Gerbig. Do not use without permission.

PINK FAIRY ARMADILLO or PICHICIEGO
Chlamyphorus truncatus
© Mariella Superina 

The Pink Fairy Armadillo or Pichiciego is the smallest species of armadillo (mammals of the family Dasypodidae, mostly known for having a bony armor shell). It is found in central Argentina where it inhabits dry grasslands and sandy plains with thorn bushes and cacti.

The Pink Fairy Armadillo spends much of its time under the ground as it is a “sand swimmer.” They use large front claws to agitate the sand, allowing them to almost swim through the ground like it is water. It is torpedo-shaped and has a shielded head to prevent abrasion from the sand.

Fact Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink_Fairy_Armadillo

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