Photojournalist-of-the-Year

Photos: Tyler Anderson Photojournalist of the Year
National Post staff photographer Tyler Anderson received the News Photographers Association of Canada (NPAC) Photojournalist of the Year award for 2010 at the awards ceremony in Winnipeg, Manitoba on  May 28, 2011. It is the second time Anderson has won the award.

Above: A man with a trumpet takes his shirt off the hood of a burning cop car on Queen Street West during the G20 Summit in Toronto, June 26, 2010.

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Quinn Rooney

3rd prize stories, Sports – 2014 World Press Photo Contest

Quinn Rooney is an Australia-based staff photographer with Getty Images. He graduated from Melbourne School of Art and Photography in 1996 and started his career as a contributor to various sporting magazines specialising in triathlon and extreme sports. In 2004 he started as a freelancer for Getty Images before eventually taking on a full-time position in 2006.

In recent years, Quinn has covered a number of national and international events including Commonwealth Games, Football World Cups, Australian Open Tennis Championships, Asian Games, Paralympic Games, FINA World Swimming Championships and the Winter and Summer Olympic Games.

In 2013, Quinn was awarded the AIPP Australian Professional Sport Photographer of the Year, took first prize for Pictures of the Year International – Olympic Feature and second prize in the Picture of the Year International – Sports Photojournalist of the Year. Quinn was also a finalist in the ‘Sport Photography’ and ‘Press Photographer of the Year’ categories for the 2013 Walkley Awards and received second place in the 2013 NPPA Sports Photojournalist of the Year.

Most recently Quinn received third prize in the sports action stories category of the 2014 World Press Photo Contest. [x]

Photographer Heidi Levine honored by women’s media group

BERLIN (AP) - Freelance photographer Heidi Levine, who has made a career of covering conflicts, was honored Thursday with the inaugural award for courage named for Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus, who was killed on assignment in Afghanistan.

  Levine, an American freelance photojournalist based in Jerusalem, has spent 30 years covering wars and revolutions. She worked with Niedringhaus in Israel, Gaza and Libya, and said it was a great honor to be the first recipient of the award in her name.

  “Anja was not just a colleague, she was also my friend,” she said in an emotional acceptance speech.

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#‎TalentSpotlight‬
Eugene Flash Koepke from USA has been a photojournalist for the past 55 years, shooting for national publications and covering 17 country’s. He has a wonderful collection of amazing photos on Tallenge and he is participating in a multiple Photography ‪#‎Contests‬ on ‪#‎Tallenge‬. This is a photo of a “Snow Leopard” in the ‪#‎Wildlife‬ ‪#‎Photography‬ ‪#‎Contest‬ and you can vote for this picture by clicking here, http://tlng.me/1K1JbMs. If you think you can win this contest and a ‪#‎CashPrize‬ of $500 then click here, http://tlng.me/1O7Ikhn to participate.

Photos: Tyler Anderson nominated for Photojournalist of the Year
National Post
photographer, Tyler Anderson, has been nominated for Photojournalist of the Year by The News Photographers Association of Canada. Over 1400 images and projects from across Canada were entered in this year’s competition. Click through for more of Tyler’s photos.

Post staffers nominated for awards
The National Post earned three National Newspaper Awards nods and two nominations from The News Photographers Association of Canada on Monday, including one for the top honour of Photojournalist of the Year.

canonwatch.com
Ian Parry Scholarship 2015: entries invited (Canon UK sponsored)
http://ift.tt/1GBTiSw

Canon press release:

If you are a photographer under the age of 24 or in full-time photographic education, or have just graduated, you have until Tuesday 14 July 2015 to apply online for this year’s Ian Parry Scholarship. A £3,500 prize plus incredible career opportunities await you…

Photojournalist Ian Parry died, aged 24, while on assignment for The Sunday Times during the Romanian revolution in 1989. Aidan Sullivan, The Sunday Times’ picture editor at the time plus Ian’s friends and family, established the Scholarship to honour his memory and help young emerging photojournalists.

Says last year’s winner, Alejandro Cegarra from Venezuela: “Three years ago when I started my photography career in a Venezuelan newspaper, I never thought that I would be where I am today and I wouldn’t be where I am without the scholarship. It has been a unique opportunity in every way.”

“The Scholarship put my work on the map: assignments, editors, you meet photographers who you admire, and that makes you grow. It is like finally opening your eyes.”

Cegarra added: “Ian Parry’s brother told me ‘No matter what you do or who you are in the future, from now on you will always be part of the Parry family’ and since then I always try to honour those beautiful words and the Ian Parry legacy.”

The Scholarship’s founder and driving force, Aidan Sullivan, added: “It has been remarkable to look back over 25 years and see what the Ian Parry Scholarship has achieved, how it has managed to help so many photographers in the early stages of their careers and has become one of the most important, widely respected and renowned award for young photojournalists.”

“We have a long list of alumni who are now amongst the most influential photographers of their generation: Marcus Bleasdale, Jonas Bendiksen, Simon Roberts, Sebastien Liste and just last year Alejandro Cegarra was added to that list.”

“Alejandro visited Visa pour l’Image in Perpignan, France, last year and sat alongside our Patron Don McCullin at a press conference to mark the 25th anniversary of Ian’s death. Little did he know then that within just 12 months he would join Reportage by Getty Images and be on his way back to Perpignan with his own exhibition.”

“That is how important this award is and I am immensely proud of what we have achieved – and I know that Ian would too.”

How to enter

Entrants must submit examples of their work from their portfolio and a brief synopsis of a project they would undertake if they won. The prize consists of £3,500 towards their chosen assignment and £500 to those awarded Highly Commended and Commended.

The benefits of winning this prestigious prize are considerable. World Press Photo automatically accepts the winner onto its final list of nominees for the Joop Swart Masterclass, held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. This is a significant prize for any photographer and along with the support of Getty Images, Canon Europe and The Sunday Times Magazine – which publishes all the finalist’s work – the scholarship provides an excellent launch into a professional career in photography.

For more information and how to apply go to the Ian Parry Scholarship website.


This post was originally published on CanonWatch, Ian Parry Scholarship 2015: entries invited (Canon UK sponsored), and is copyrighted.

Finding Your Passion: Advice from  Sabastiâo Sagado

The photographer Sabastiâo Sagado has lived a colorful life, growing up in Brazil under a dictatorship that he fought against, he later enrolled in university to study Economics. He moved to Paris and later went to Africa and it wasn’t till his late 20’s he picked up his camera and began to shoot. Sagado doesn’t like to label himself a photojournalist but a man who he is doing something he loves. Sagardo shares his advice to young journalists; don’t just focus on photography while in school focus in different areas of study so you begin to better understand the world around you.
         “If you’re young and have the time, go and study. Study          anthropology, sociology, economy, geopolitics. Study so that you’re    actually able to understand what you’re photographing. What you can photograph and what you should photograph.”

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics working as a photojournalist only has an average pay of $28,490 a year, while not terrible it can be a struggle for any young photographer to get on their feet and gathering resources to travel can be difficult. Sagado at one point during his speech he describes a moment during his time traveling when he on the top of a mountain in Brazil. He begins to cry thinking about his family waiting for him back in Brazil and the thought of the money he spent traveling was hard for him think about. But because of his love and dedication for his work he continued on with his journey.
As someone who is not a photojournalist or even a journalist Sagado’s statement still speaks to me. As a Art History major with plans to work in a museum my job opportunities are limited and like photojournalism my field is highly competitive as you work your way to better career opportunities. But because I have finally found something that I love the idea of the future no longer scares me because I know that I will do something I love. This post reminded me of this quote:
        Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.
Confucius

Your passion will drive you and can help you stay on a path. You can learn all the professional skills to be an amazing photographer and you can go out and take picture after picture to build your portfolio but if you don’t love what your doing your work will not fulfill you.  Photojournalism is a competitive field and traveling is apart of the job knowing what you love and understanding the subjects you are shooting can only help you developing your passion. Sabastiâo Sagado found his covering social issues throughout the world and he is challenging young photographer to find theirs.


Original Post: https://medium.com/morning-light/sebasti%C3%A3o-salgado-s-advice-for-young-photographers-today-94d21cb3086f

Photographer Heidi Levine honored by women's media group

BERLIN (AP) — Freelance photographer Heidi Levine, who has made a career of covering conflicts, was honored Thursday with the inaugural award for courage named for Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus, who was killed on assignment in Afghanistan.

Levine, an American freelance photojournalist based in Jerusalem, has spent 30 years covering wars and revolutions. She worked with Niedringhaus in Israel, Gaza and Libya, and said it was a great honor to be the first recipient of the award in her name.

“Anja was not just a colleague, she was also my friend,” she said in an emotional acceptance speech.

Santiago Lyon, AP’s director of photography and a jury member, said that among more than three dozen nominations, Levine’s entry “stood out from the others immediately.”

“She is truly a remarkable practitioner of photojournalism, a skilled visual storyteller and a warm caring person,” Lyon said. “She is very deserving of this award.”

The Anja Niedringhaus Courage in Photojournalism Award is a $20,000 prize established by the Washington-based International Women’s Media Foundation and funded by the Howard G. Buffett Foundation.

It was created to honor Niedringhaus, who was killed last year on assignment when an Afghan police commander walked up to the car she was in and opened fire. Her friend and colleague, AP reporter Kathy Gannon, was seriously injured in the assault.

At the award ceremony, Gannon said Niedringhaus showed a compassion, empathy and humor in her photos that was also a reflection of how she was as a person.

“Anja’s passion was her photography, but she was also so much more,” Gannon said.

She added that she can imagine “Anja smiling, happy that Heidi Levine was chosen as the first recipient of this award in her name.”

Levine is originally from Boston and moved to Israel in 1983. She began her career with the AP and is now represented by the Sipa Press photo agency.

The prize will be awarded annually to a female photojournalist who reflects the courage and dedication of Niedringhaus.

Niedringhaus started her career as a freelance photographer when she was 16 in her native Germany and went on to cover the conflict in the former Yugoslavia. She joined the AP in 2002 and worked throughout the Middle East, as well as in Afghanistan and Pakistan. She was part of an AP team that won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography for coverage of Iraq.

Photos: Tyler Anderson Photojournalist of the Year
National Post staff photographer Tyler Anderson received the News Photographers Association of Canada (NPAC) Photojournalist of the Year award for 2010 at the awards ceremony in Winnipeg, Manitoba on  May 28, 2011. It is the second time Anderson has won the award.

Above: Children pose for a photo during a water fight on a hot day in Leogan, Haiti, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2010.

Legendary NYC street photographer Harold Feinstein dies at 84

Legendary NYC street photographer Harold Feinstein dies at 84

Harold Feinstein, April 17, 1931 – June 20, 2015

Harold Feinstein, was an early pioneer in the New York City street photography scene. Harold was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1931. At the age of 17, 4 of his prints were purchased by Edward Steichen for the collection at MoMA. Harold Feinstein’s career as a street photographer, photojournalist, designer, and teacher spanned over 70 years. He died June…

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#regrann @instagram - “I love complex photos, and that’s why I choose to work in crowded places,” says Linh Pham (@phamhaduylinh), a 24-year-old Vietnamese photojournalist. “And at the same time, I always try to find something that stands out from the crowd — a sunbeam, or someone doing something different or wearing a different color than everyone else. Photography, for me, is a type of exploration.” One element of that exploration, Linh says, is revisiting the places he has photographed by re-examining the pictures themselves. “When you’re in a crowd you can’t see everything at once, but afterward, if you’ve taken some good pictures, you can take the time to go back and look at the details and you can see what was really going on at that moment.” Photo by @phamhaduylinh