SYRIA. Aleppo governorate. Outskirts of Aleppo. June 12, 2012. Free Syrian Army fighters sit in a house.

This picture was part of a larger portfolio of images from Syria by AP photographers that won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize.

Photograph: Khalil Hamra/AP

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On Thursday morning, law enforcement entered the Oceti Sakowin camp to do a final sweep before officially shutting it down, ending a months-long protest against the completion of the nearby Dakota Access Pipeline.

The Oceti Sakowin camp was the largest of several temporary camps on the northern edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. Protesters have been living on this land for months, in support of members of the Standing Rock Sioux.

Supporters have said that running the pipeline under under a part of the Missouri River known as Lake Oahe would jeopardize the primary water source for the reservation, and construction would damage sacred sites, violating tribal treaty rights. The river crossing is the last major piece of the pipeline that remains unfinished.

PHOTOS: The Final Hours Of A Dakota Access Pipeline Protest Camp

Photos: Angus Mordant for NPR

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Pictures of Iraq: Photojournalists bear witness to horror in ISIS-occupied Mosul

Yahoo News reached out to three Reuters photographers who have been assigned to cover the battle of Mosul since the Iraqi army launched an offensive to reclaim the city on Oct. 16, 2016. They were asked a variety of questions pertaining to their experiences in the war-torn city. The photographers discussed their careers leading to this assignment, what it’s like to work alongside Iraqi troops, their interactions with the displaced civilians and which photographs meant the most to them.

Read the story by Michael Walsh/Yahoo News

Photography above by: Goran Tomasevic, Zohra Bensemra, Alaa Al-Marjani, Goran Tomasevic, Alaa Al-Marjani, Zohra Bensemra

Anna Bondaruk a Szeptunka from the village of Rutka prays at her home. Bondaruk claims to have a personal connection with Mary and sees villagers throughout the day for healing.

Location: Podlasie Province, Poland

Photographer: Diana Markosian

In remote northeastern Poland there lives a group of elderly Orthodox devotees who are said to possess special powers. They can heal the sick, cast out demons — even still a foe’s heart. Living at a mystical crossroad of Christian faith and folkloric superstition, they consider themselves members of the church, though the church does not. They are called “Whisperers or Szeptun in Polish.

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March for the Gurlz: Stop Killing Black Trans Women

Since the beginning of 2017, 7 Black transwomen have been murdered. Living at the intersections of race, gender and sexuality, transwomen in Atlanta and nationwide are demanding an end to this violence.

On March 26th Atlanta came together to take over the streets led by Black transwomen to celebrate their lives and mourn the ones we’ve lost.

For more information visit: IG @snap4freedom

Follow my photography: IG @ tifthephotographer

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In 1890, Sir Thomas Lipton arrived on the island of Ceylon, now Sri Lanka, to purchase a plot of land that would become the first tea estate in his global tea empire. These days, in the Ambadandegama Valley located just a few miles from Lipton’s original estate, another experiment in tea production is unfolding.

Tucked into the side of a precipitous mountain, Amba Estate is a tea operation that shares 10 percent of its revenues with its workers. That’s a novel approach here in Sri Lanka, a country that’s one of the world’s largest exporters of tea — an industry that employs more than 1 million of its 22 million residents.

“What makes us different is our 10 percent revenue share — not profit share. We decided to do revenue share because even when we’re not making a profit, we felt it was only right that workers and management receives recognition,” says Simon Bell.

Bell purchased the 26-acre Amba Estate in 2006 with three partners – all of whom had previously worked in international development. Their goal, he says, was to create a for-profit social enterprise that could create long-term employment in the region. “It’s thanks to the hard work and innovation [of the workers] that we’ve grown revenue 20 fold over the last few years.”

The estate employs 30 full-time workers from the local village. One elderly Tamil couple resides on the property itself. They had lived in an old line house, a structure built to house tea workers during the days of British rule, since long before Bell and his partners purchased the land. “We didn’t know if they had anywhere else to go,” says Bell. “They asked to stay and we were happy to let them.”

PHOTOS: In Sri Lanka’s Tea Paradise, A Social Enterprise Is Brewing

Photos: Victoria Milko for NPR

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Police brutality protests in Paris suburbs

Protests continue in the Paris suburbs over the assault of a young black man allegedly sodomized with a police baton.

The police accused “several hundred” individuals of various “acts of violence and damage.”

The rioting capped a week of nightly clashes in the northern Paris suburb over the treatment of Theo, a 22-year-old youth worker, who claims a police officer sodomized him with his baton after a stop-and-search check in a housing estate.

One officer has been charged with rape over the affair, and three others with assault. All four have been suspended from their duties.

Theo’s case has revived long-simmering frustrations over policing in immigrant communities, where young men accuse the police of repeatedly targeting them in aggressive stop-and-search operations and using excessive force during arrests.

The police for their part complain of being drawn into a cat-and-mouse game with delinquents and drug dealers operating out of housing estates. (AFP)

(Photos: Christian Hartmann/Reuters, Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images [2], Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt/AFP/Getty Images)

See more images from the protests on Yahoo News.

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‘Not My President’s Day’ protests in the U.S.

Thousands of people in cities around the country are expected to turn out in protest of President Trump on Monday — a federal holiday that organizers are calling “Not My President’s Day.” Yahoo News has dispatched reporters to cover the major demonstrations planned in New York City, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles and elsewhere.

(Photos: Gordon Donovan/Yahoo News [3], Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images [2])

See more images from the protests on Yahoo News.

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Protesting the Dakota Access pipeline, Native Americans march on Washington, D.C.

American Indians and their supporters are rallying in Washington against continued construction of the disputed Dakota Access pipeline.

A federal judge this week declined to halt construction of the final section of the $3.8 billion pipeline, meaning oil could begin flowing through it as early as next week.

The Standing Rock Sioux and other tribes have tried to stop the pipeline, saying it threatens their sovereignty, religious rights and water supply. The final, disputed section of the pipeline would pass under a reservoir that provides water to tribal reservations. The pipeline itself is not on tribal land.

On Friday, protesters marched from the Army Corps of Engineers headquarters to the White House. With the encouragement of President Donald Trump’s administration, the Army authorized construction of the pipeline to start again. That move canceled an environmental study ordered under the administration of President Barack Obama. (AP)

(Photos: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images, Kevin Lamarque/Reuters, Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images [2], Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP)

See more images from the protests on Yahoo News.

COLOMBIA. Caquetá. La Unión Peneya. November 2013. A group of civilians on horseback crossing a bridge. The FARC South Block commands the main historical FARC strongholds, places which have lived under a parallel state to the rest of Colombia for five decades of conflict. In these parts of Colombia, the defining surrounding political environment has only ever been war and society has never known state authority, except during military operations, when government forces have been accused of having committed numerous human rights violations.

Photograph: Alvaro Ybarra Zavala/Archivo Macondo