Penny4NASA

On this day in 1968, Yuri Gagarin, the first human in space, died never having gotten to see man touch the surface of another world.

In 1961, cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first ambassador of our planet to enter the vastness of space. Vostok 1 was the first manned spaceflight of the early space race, and Gagarin completed one orbit of Earth before landing safely 108 minutes later.

While flying weightless above Earth’s surface, Yuri Gagarin witnessed a spectacular view of home — forests, deserts, and great plains were surrounded by expansive oceans. Upon viewing the thin blue line of the atmosphere, Gagarin became the first of our inquisitive species to see our planet as it truly is — a vibrant, geologically active world circling a star. Unfortunately, Yuri died seven years later during a jet crash in 1968, never having gotten to see man touch the surface of another world.

We at Penny4NASA urge you to honor the memory of this brave man, as his Vostok 1 mission was the catalyst for every manned spaceflight to date.

On April 24, 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope was launched into orbit.

“No matter what Hubble reveals — planets, dense star fields, colorful interstellar nebulae, deadly black holes, graceful colliding galaxies, the large-scale structure of the Universe — each image establishes your own private vista on the cosmos.” - Neil deGrasse Tyson

Our friends at In Saturn’s Rings are looking for volunteers to help them complete their film.

In Saturn’s Rings is a ground-breaking IMAX film that will take viewers on a stunning tour of our Solar System. The film is created entirely from NASA photographs — no CGI — using a filmmaking technique called photoanimation, which will provide audiences with the most authentic experience of what space travel is really like. Watch the 4K trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNMVxVTEHT8

They need some additional volunteers to help process some high resolution images for the Milky Way sequence of the film.

Skills Needed:
– Ability to open and save high-resolution images from 500mb-3GB in size
– Intermediate to advanced Photoshop or GIMP skills
– Especially with selecting/copying/pasting and clone-stamp painting
– Basic knowledge of layers and blending modes
– Knowledge of vector masking preferable

Send an email to info@insaturnsrings.com if you’re interested.

When it landed on Venus on December 15th, 1970, Venera 7 became the first spacecraft to achieve a soft-landing on another planet.

Only able to transmit surface data back to Earth for 23 minutes due to signal degradation, it was determined by Venera 7’s transmission that the atmosphere of Venus is composed 97% of carbon dioxide, with a temperature reading of 887°F (475°C).

“May well have been one small step for Neil, but it’s a heck of a big leap for me!” - Bruce McCandless

On February 7th, 1984 – the fourth day of STS 41-B – astronauts Bruce McCandless and Robert Stewart performed the first untethered spacewalks, operating the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) for the first time. McCandless, the first human Earth-orbiting satellite, ventured out 320 feet (98 m) from the orbiter, while Stewart tested the “work station” foot restraint at the end of the Remote Manipulator System. On the seventh day of the mission, both astronauts performed an EVA to practice capture procedures for the Solar Maximum Mission satellite retrieval and repair operation, which was planned for the next mission, STS-41-C.

In 1961, cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first ambassador of our planet to enter the vastness of space. Vostok 1 was the first manned spaceflight of the early space race, and Gagarin completed one orbit of Earth before landing safely 108 minutes later.

While flying weightless above Earth’s surface, Yuri Gagarin witnessed a spectacular view of home – forests, deserts, and great plains were surrounded by expansive oceans. Upon viewing the thin blue line of the atmosphere, Gagarin became the first of our inquisitive species to see our planet as it truly is – a vibrant, geologically active world circling a star. He unfortunately died seven years later during a jet crash in 1968, and today is the anniversary of Gagarin’s accident. With that said, we at Penny4NASA urge you to honor the memory of this brave man, as his Vostok 1 mission was the catalyst for every manned spaceflight adventure to date.

#Penny4NASA   #Space   #Vostok   #Vostok1   #SpaceExploration   #YuriGagarin  #Gagarin  

On this day In 1961, cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first ambassador of our planet to enter the vastness of space. Vostok 1 was the first manned spaceflight of the early space race, and Gagarin completed one orbit of Earth before landing safely 108 minutes later.

While flying weightless above Earth’s surface, Yuri Gagarin witnessed a spectacular view of home – forests, deserts, and great plains were surrounded by expansive oceans. Upon viewing the thin blue line of the atmosphere, Gagarin became the first of our inquisitive species to see our planet as it truly is – a vibrant, geologically active world circling a star. We at Penny4NASA urge you to honor the memory of this brave man, as his Vostok 1 mission was the catalyst for every manned spaceflight adventure to date.

Since 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope has broadened our species’ collective understanding of the universe. For the past 24 years, this massive telescope has been regarded as one of the greatest scientific instruments we as humans have ever constructed. Hubble has contributed to our understanding of the universe in various ways, upending several key theories about the cosmos. Specifically, the Hubble Space Telescope proved vital with regards to the realization that the expansion of the universe is accelerating – not slowing down as was widely believed.

While Hubble continues to unveil the universe to us, plans for its successor are already underway. NASA has developed infrared-sensitive telescopes and instruments, such as the Wide Field Camera on Hubble which was fitted in 2009. This relatively new addition of infrared viewing capability is a small sample of what is on the horizon for astronomical study. The James Webb Space Telescope – set to launch in 2018 – will expand upon this technology and has a mission objective that includes observing the most distant objects in the universe. This task simply isn’t possible using standard cameras, as astronomers will have to rely upon infrared technology accordingly.

As part of Hubble’s 24th anniversary of being in service, we at Penny4NASA want to plug David Gaynes’ documentary, “Saving Hubble.”

http://vimeo.com/58957564

youtube

Because It Is There

On September 12, 1962 President John F. Kennedy delivered one of the most inspirational and prescient policy speeches in world history. President Kennedy proclaimed at Rice University in Houston, Texas that the United States effort to land a man on the Moon would be extremely risky and full of unknowns. JFK also proclaimed that the exploration of space would prove to be one of the great adventures of human history and provide huge benefits to the United States and the world.

We at Penny4NASA are proud to share our friend Brandon Fibbs’s  newest video, which powerfully conveys Kennedy’s historic message in new ways.

“Because it is There:” President Kennedy on the Exploration of Space
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6-pxKOnvyo

“A scientific colleague tells me about a recent trip to the New Guinea highlands where she visited a stone age culture hardly contacted by Western civilization. They were ignorant of wristwatches, soft drinks, and frozen food. But they knew about Apollo 11. They knew that humans had walked on the moon. They knew the names of Armstrong and Aldrin and Collins. They wanted to know who was visiting the moon these days.” - Carl Sagan

After traveling four days and more than 238,900 miles, the Lunar Module Eagle began its descent to the surface of the Moon. Very early on, however, it became clear to Aldrin and Armstrong that their telemetry was incorrect as they recognized lunar landmarks were being passed too early. At approximately 6,000 miles above the surface, numerous guidance computer program alarms distracted the crew as they communicated with flight controllers. Mission Control engineers soon reassured the Eagle to continue with the descent as it was determined that their system was being overloaded with extra tasks not necessary to land on the Moon. After looking out of the window a few moments later, Armstrong was forced to take semi-manual control as he noticed that the navigational systems were guiding them towards an area comprised of boulders and an uneven landing surface. This manual override would require Aldrin to call out velocity and altitude data before landing fuel ran out. After a somewhat frantic period, the Lunar Module safely landed on the moon on July 20th, 1969 – with about 25 seconds of fuel remaining.

As an estimated 600 million people watched, Neil Armstrong became the first ambassador of the planet Earth to walk on another world. For over 2.5 hours, he and Buzz Aldrin captured the imagination of our species as they performed various scientific and geological experiments. Along with planting an American flag, a commemorative plaque marking this monumental human achievement was mounted to the Apollo 11 Lunar Module – and remains as a relic of humanity’s first journey on the Moon.

“We came in peace for all mankind. That statement really to me was a very symbolic one – not just of our mission, but of the entire Apollo effort.” - Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 Lunar Module Pilot

Apollo 11 was arguably our most exciting adventure, and over the span of three years, NASA sent a total of 12 astronauts to explore the Moon. However, not since 1972 have human beings been beyond low-Earth orbit. Please watch our video, The Spirit of Apollo, and consider what raising the NASA budget will once again do for our society.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_G6jhUznonU

Today, on Memorial Day, we at Penny4NASA are remembering those who have given their lives while serving this nation.

Since its establishment in 1958, NASA has had close ties with all branches of the United States Armed Forces, with many astronauts themselves having served in the military. In 1967, Gus Grissom (United States Air Force), Ed White (United States Air Force), and Roger Chaffee (United States Navy) lost their lives due to a cabin fire while performing an Apollo 1 launch rehearsal.

They will never be forgotten.