Peaceful Revolution

25th of April, 1974 - Portugal - Photo by Eduardo Gageiro

In PIDE’s headquarters (International and State Defense Police), the portrait of António de Oliveira Salazar, the dictator, is taken down during the Carnation Revolution.

Hate it or Love it: 50 quotes from MLK that white people can use besides ‘hate cannot drive out hate’

Every year around Martin Luther King Jr. Day everyone likes to drop an inspirational quote from Dr. King. Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a multifaceted philosopher and an amazing orator with a plethora of accessible speeches, sermons and books; yet, somewhere along the way it seems as if a rule was created, restricting white people to one quote in particular:

Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”

I don’t know the reason behind the restriction; perhaps because this is one of the better quotes to try to push the “I don’t see color; we’re one race – the human race” agenda. Or perhaps the darkness and the light can be used to represent black and white and thus play into the white savior movement. Whatever the reason may be! BlackHistoryDay.tumblr.com is here today to give you 50 quotes from Dr. King that I encourage you to keep in mind for your future references:

1. “No movement of essentially revolutionary quality can be neat and tidy.”

2. “The only answer that one can give to those who would question the readiness of the Negro for integration is that the standards of the Negro lag behind at times not because of an inherent inferiority, but because of the fact that segregation and discrimination do exist.” 

3. “There is no more torturous logic than to use the tragic effects of segregation as an argument for its continuation.”

4. “It is one of the ironies of history that in a nation founded on the principle that all men are created equal, we’re still arguing over whether the color of a man’s skin determines the content of his character.”

5. “There comes a time, my friends, when people get tired of being plunged across the abyss of humiliation, where they experience the bleakness of nagging despair. There comes a time when people get tired of being pushed out of the glittering sunlight of life’s July and left standing amid the piercing chill of an alpine November.”

6. “There are some things that we’ve got to learn to sacrifice for. And we’ve got to come to the point that we are determined not to accept a lot of things that we have been accepting in the past.” 

7. “We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality…”

8. “We must see now that the evils of racism, economic exploitation and militarism are all tied together… you can’t really get rid of one without getting rid of the others… the whole structure of American life must be changed. America is a hypocritical nation and [we] must put [our] own house in order.”

9. “What good is having the right to sit at a lunch counter if you can’t afford to buy a hamburger?” 

10. “Increasingly, by choice or by accident, this is the role our nation has taken, the role of those who make peaceful revolution impossible by refusing to give up the privileges and the pleasures that come from the immense profits of overseas investments.”

11. “If we will but make the right choice, we will be able to speed up the day, all over America and all over the world, when justice will roll down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.”

12. “That the poor white has been put into this position, where through blindness and prejudice, he is forced to support his oppressors. And the only thing he has going for him is the false feeling that he’s superior because his skin is white—and can’t hardly eat and make his ends meet week in and week out.” 

13. “Through our scientific and technological developments we have lifted our heads to the skies, and yet our feet are still firmly planted in the muck of barbarism and racial hatred. Indeed this is America’s chief moral dilemma.”

14. “To keep a group of people confined to nasty slums and dirty hovels is not a State Right, but a State Wrong.”

15. “It may be true that morals cannot be legislated, but behavior can be regulated.”

16. “It may be true that laws and federal action cannot change bad internal attitudes, but they can control the external effects of those internal attitudes.”

17. “The law may not be able to make a man love me, but it can keep him from lynching me.”

18. “Even this nation came into being with a massive act of law breaking; for what implied more civil disobedience than the Boston tea party…there’s nothing new about law breaking.”

19. “God has brought us here for this hour to tell us to save America because our white brothers is carrying it more and more to destruction and damnation.”

20. “We’re called to do it so that means we can’t stop. This should make us more determined than ever before.”

21. “Now they always tell us to cool off and I know that when you get people cooling off too much they will end up in a deep freeze. They tell us to slow up and some of them even say that the Negros in Albany out to go home and be quiet because there’s a political campaign going on and you may help elect some particular candidate that shouldn’t be in office. Well I don’t know if you have an answer for them and I don‘t know if I have an absolute answer but I want to say to those who are telling us to stop merely because a political campaign is going on that this is a moral issue for us. We’re moving on towards freedom’s land. We cannot stop our legitimate aspirations for freedom merely because some immoral person will use this for his own political aggrandizements…”

22. “We worked in this very nation 2 centuries without wages. We made cotton king; we built our homes and the homes of our masters in the midst of injustice and exploitation. Yet out of a bottomless vitality we continue to grow and to live and if the inexpressible cruelties of slavery didn’t stop us, the opposition that we now face cannot stop us.”

23. “The absence of brutality and unregenerate evil is not the presence of justice.”

24. “As the nation passes from opposing extremist behavior to the deeper and more pervasive elements of equality, white america reaffirms its bonds to the status quo.”

25. “Whites, it must frankly be said, are not putting in a similar mass effort to reeducate themselves out of their racial ignorance.”

26. “It is an aspect of their sense of superiority that the white people of America believe they have so little to learn.”

27. “To find the origins of the Negro problem we must turn to the white man’s problem.”

28. “It seems to be a fact of life that human beings cannot continue to do wrong without eventually reaching out for some rationalization to clothe their acts in the garments of righteousness.”

29. “The greatest blasphemy of the whole ugly process was that the white man ended up making God his partner in the exploitation of the Negro.”

30. “Just as the ambivalence of white Americans grows out of their oppressor status, the predicament of Negro Americans grows out of their oppressed status.”

31. “Negroes have grown accustomed now to hearing unfeeling and insensitive whites say: ‘other immigrant groups such as the Irish, the Jews and the Italians started out with similar handicaps, and yet they made it. Why haven’t the Negroes done the same?’ These questioners refuse to see that the situation of other immigrant groups a hundred years ago and the situation of the Negro today cannot be usefully compared.”

32. “The Negro was crushed, battered and brutalized, but he never gave up. He proves again that life is stronger than death.”

33. “A riot is at bottom the language of the unheard. It is the desperate, suicidal cry of one who is so fed up with the powerlessness of his cave existence that he asserts that he would rather be dead than ignored.”

34. “What is needed today on the part of white America is a committed altruism which recognizes this truth.”

35. “True altruism is more than the capacity to pity; it is the capacity to empathize. Pity is feeling sorry for someone; empathy is feeling sorry with someone. Empathy is fellow feeling for the person in need— his pain, agony and burdens.” 

36. “I can never be who I ought to be until you are what you ought to be. This is the way our world is made.”

37. “True education helps us on the one hand to know truth, but more than that it helps us to love truth and sacrifice for it. It gives us not only knowledge, which is power, but wisdom, which is control.”

38. “If you can’t fly, run; if you can’t run, walk; if you can’t walk, crawl; but by all means keep moving.”

39. “We will move out of these mountains that have so often impeded our progress, the mountain of moral and ethical relativism, the mountain of practical materialism, the mountain of corroding hatred, bitterness and violence, and the mountain of racial segregation.”

40. “…Always have faith in the possibility of getting over to the Promised Land. Don’t become a pessimist and feel that we cannot get there; it is difficult sometimes, it is hard sometimes, but always have faith that the Promised Land can be achieved and that we can possess this land of brotherhood and peace and understanding.”

41. “An individual who is not concerned about his selfhood and his freedom is at that moment committing moral and spiritual suicide…”

42. “But I know, somehow, that only when it is dark enough can you see the stars.”

43. “There comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular but he must take it because conscience tells him it is right.”

44. “Many people fear nothing more terribly than to take a position which stands out sharply and clearly from the prevailing opinion.”

45. “Many sincere white people in the south privately oppose segregation and discrimination, but they are apprehensive lest they be publicly condemned.”

46. “’Do not conform’ is difficult advice in a generation when crowd pressures have unconsciously conditioned our minds and feet to move to the rhythmic drum beat of the status quo.”

47. “This tragic attempt to give moral sanction to an economically profitable system gave birth to the doctrine of white supremacy.”

48. “Unlike physical blindness that is usually inflicted upon individuals as a result of natural forces beyond their control, intellectual and moral blindness is a dilemma which man inflicts upon himself by his tragic misuse of freedom and his failure to use his mind to its fullest capacity.”

49. “Only through the bringing together of head and heart-intelligence and goodness shall man rise to a fulfillment of his true nature.”

50. “Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.”

Enjoy.

And while I’m at it:

On November 9 1938 the Progrom Night led to Jews being harmed and murdered, synagogues being burned and homes and companies of Jews being broken into and being ruined and being robbed in Germany so today Germany remembers these events.

On November 9 1989 the Monday Demonstrations of East German citizens led to the Berlin wall falling down, uniting a country and a continent and 17 million East Germans were free, weren’t imprisoned anymore.

On November 9 2016 America elects a man who wants to build a wall and if you can’t imagine the reactions of Germans and former East Germans, I have serious doubts about your common knowledge and your history knowledge.

In April 2002 Germany presented the  United Nations with a gift of three pieces from the #Berlin Wall, emblazoned with the words “Trophy of Civil Rights”.

The piece, displayed at UN Headquarters in New York, depicts two people joining together across a barrier.

A plaque on the piece describes that the fall of the Wall, which was the result of a peaceful revolution in 1989 as “one of the happiest moments in the history of the German people”.

At its unveiling, then Secretary-General Kofi Annan said that the piece symbolized the tendency of people to put up artificial barriers instead of finding ways to understand each other, but that it also held a lesson: “the lesson that divisions in the human community are not so insurmountable as we feared; that gaps of misunderstanding and material well-being can be bridged; and that we can, like the couple depicted here, join hands and unite for a better world.”

📷: UN Photo / Paulo Filgueiras

anonymous asked:

So i very strongly sided with the mages until i saw what it turned into at the end of da:2 and what happens in da:i, i can fully support wanting more freedoms and to be given a chance at a real life, but what it looks like theyre trying to do is rebuild the tevinter imperium and i cannot support that, but i still dont agree with the templars either, and honestly this whole thing couldve been avoided if the chantry had been a little more lenient with the circle

What it leaded to in DA2? I don’t know what you mean really. Unless you mean Anders’ actions, but he wasn’t acting with any other mages. And at the end of the game he was so fused with Justice I don’t think we can even be sure he would’ve acted the same way if he were just himself. Also, what it lead to? It led to the mages - who did not do anything - all going to be killed because of it, well actually Meredith had already sent for the right of annulment before Anders’ actions so… yeah I can’t really see how I’m meant to blame mages for that? There are a few instances in da2 when mages do bad things, but they’re always a reaction to the insane amount of abuse in that circle.

And what do you mean in da:i? In what way are they ‘rebuilding the Tevinter Imperium’? Please send in another ask because I don’t get it? I might be missing something?

I do agree that the Chantry could’ve avoided the whole thing, but it would have meant an entire restructuring of the Circle, not just ‘being a little more lenient’. The Circle would have to stop being a prison and become an actual place where mages can be save and learn in safety. And I don’t think the Chantry would ever be willing to do so, considering how much power and money they would lose.


I view the question of ‘templars vs mages’ as simply this: are the horrors of the circle a justified necessary evil to protect the rest of the population from the possible crimes, or accidental destruction caused by mages?

That’s the only question that matters. That’s where the true grey morality of this issue comes in. Do you think the chantry is right that mages are so inherently dangerous that they need to be held prisoner their entire lives? That the Chantry has the right to decide which of them need to be made tranquil, or punished in other ways, and which entire circles get to be murdered down to the last child?

My answer is always going to be no. That’s why I support the mages. Always. And not just because we’ve already seen more peaceful solutions in game.

Just think about it, in the real world if we determine which groups are most likely to commit violent crimes, would you support pre-emptively locking them up? (Remember, modern day weapons can be as dangerous as any magic we’ve seen in game.) Probably not.

And let’s be clear, even a circle where there is no abuse is still a horrific idea in principle:

- Being locked up the rest of your life

- cut of from family

- not allowed to go outside 

- not allowed to form romantic attachments

- not allowed to have a family (and having any child you might have taken away from you)

- living with armed men instructed to kill you if you necessary 

- being constantly told you’re basically a walkign bomb so dangerous the world needs to be protected from you

- Living with the threat of the right of annulment your whole life

- Living with the threat of being made tranquil (yes yes, until you pass a horrifying test, unless you live in one of the circles that ignore that rule and oh yes the chantry and the circle has a huge monetary incentive to make you tranquil or suggest you allow them to make you tranquil even before the test)


Even if this prison - and it is a prison no matter how cosy the beds - doesn’t suffer from any abuse of power it’s still a horror show. But then I don’t think there will be a circle with no abuse. Just because predatory people are often dawn to positions where they can enact abuse and get away with it and the circle is the perfect place; no one gives a shit about the mages. Also, the only circles we’ve seen in game have been abusive, I find it odd to presume there must be a perfect circle where there is only the horrors of it being a prison.

And I haven’t even gotten into the whole idea that the Chantry makes money off making people tranquil, which kinda motivates them to make more mages tranquil, if only to keep the money flowing. Or that if the Chantry ever admitted that mages don’t need constant surveillance it means they will either have to admit that the templars are mainly there to be the Chantry’s military arm, or cut down on how many templars there are, and so weaken the Chantry’s power. (That’s what I mean when I say getting rid of the Circles would cost the Chantry too much.)


On the subject of ‘trying to rebuild the Tevinter Imperium’, I have to say the abuses of the Tevinter Imperium are not caused by magic, so assuming a society where Mages are free and able to be in positions of power, is going to be ‘like the Tevinter Imperium’ is just not how it works.

Slavery isn’t something exclusive to magic (well using spirits as slaves as well might be), and (blood) magic, is just the tool they use to enact their cruelty. If they had no magic they would find other ways. And to be frank, while I’m sure the other nations we have seen in game would claim moral superiority over Tevinter, I don’t think they can. Look at the way they treat the elves? Look at what the Chantry has done? Profiting off making people tranquil, making Templars addicted to something they control?

Also, remember the elves being sold into slavery in da:o? Do you think that was the only time that happened? It seems pretty unlikely doesn’t it?

So yes Tevinter is horrible, but I think the problem with saying ‘they want to rebuild the Tevinter Imperium’ is that it fails to recognise that the other nations have their own horrors and that depending on who (or what race) you are in Ferelden or Orlais, your life might already be as bad as that of the lowliest person in Tevinter.


It’s easy to judge the mage rebellion for causing too much destruction etc etc, but it’s not like the Chantry would ever have willingly let them go. The mages were pushed in a corner, they didn’t one day decide that they would cause this. I would love it if peaceful revolution was possible but it isn’t. It’s always a question of what are you willing to sacrifice to gain your freedom.


DA:I could have been a great morally muddled story about what is justified in the name of revolution, of freedom. It could’ve shown us a mage rebellion where some are forced to fight, where some mages only take revenge for the abuse they suffered, while others desperately tried to find peaceful ways to change the world. It could have shown us templars being pushed to the edge by the chantry, and those who gleefully hunt and kill mages. It could’ve shown us exactly how much it costs templars to break with the Chantry.

Cullen does to a degree show us and in DA2 we had Samson, but I would’ve liked something like a Knight-Captain who objected morally to the abuses of the Chantry, tried to reason with them to go against amoral orders and ended up with the Chantry cutting off his lyrium supply so he was forced to watch the templars under his command suffer and a few of them die. Actually that would’ve made a great quest that with show us exactly how little control templars really have.


I’m just going to end with some links with more information on the mages and the Circle/ Chantry/ templars. I think all these help to get the whole picture on the situation for mages, necessary to understand why revolution was unavoidable (and before you judge their rebellions as ‘going too far.’) 


1. A post discussing why Anders did what he did and why other options weren’t available. I’m not entirely decided on whether I support Anders’ actions myself, but this is an interesting read on why the mages had to rebel to gain any power and why it’s difficult to judge them for it. It also touches on more abuses of the Chantry.


2. A post with a number of reactions to the idea of the Circle being ‘a nice place’ which it can’t be by its very nature. Also mentions some other abuses that will happen in even ‘peaceful circles’ like Anders’ punishment of solitary confinement for a year, which is literal torture and if you want to understand to what extent a quick google search will do on why solitary confinement is torture.

3. A great post about why tranquility is not a mercy and in fact a system that is incredibly vulnerable to abuse (and not just in da2). Also touches on how the Circle provides the Chantry with funds (and so power, which of course makes their ‘magic is evil we will protect’ you bs stink a little more.)

4. A post discussing why not all templars can ‘just stop taking lyium’ which helps to show that they’re basically trapped in this system as well.

5. A post combining resources about the abuses the mages face in da2, I’d recommend reading it even if you feel you know all of them already because I’ve played da2 many many times and I was surprised by some of these. Also remember that just because this is the worst circle we’ve seen it does not mean the abuses are unique to this circle.

6. A post explaining more about the Chantry and why it needs its military arm, and how it abuses that power. ties in to how they can’t admit that mages don’t need constant surveillance without either admitting the real use of templars.

7. A post about the theory that templars aren’t meant to protect mages but are meant to make sure there aren’t too many mages. (In other words, they are there to kill mages.) I don’t necessarily agree with everything in the post, though it does make sense that the Chantry would limit how many mages there are in any one circle to prevent an uprising. Still the post contains some interesting discussions about the templars tactics and how they don’t make sense if they’re meant to just protect mages. This of course does not mean every day templars are aware of what the real order are and I imagine there are templars who truly believe they are meant to protect mages.

8. A really good post on why Meredith wasn’t ‘just doing what she thought best’ and was pretty horrible before the red lyrium business. Also, while it’s easy to say meredith does not represent the Chantry the fact is the Chantry never stepped in and at the very least it shows how rife this system is for abuse and how little people or the Chantry care what happens to mages.